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Pa-O
The Pa'O (Pa-O, Paoh) (Burmese: ပအိုဝ်းလူမျိုး, IPA: [pəo̰ lùmjóʊ], or paohတောင်သူ; Shan: ပဢူဝ်း) is the seventh largest ethnic nationality in Burma with a population of approximately 2,000,000[1]2,600,000[2]Contents1 History 2 People 3 Agriculture 4 Culture4.1 Fire Rocket Festival 4.2 National Day 4.3 Religious beliefs 4.4 Origin story 4.5 Dress 4.6 Marriages 4.7 Funerals 4.8 Literature 4.9 Music5 Institutions5.1 Political party6 Notable Pa'O 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Pa'O settled in the Thaton
Thaton
region of present-day Myanmar
Myanmar
around 1000 B.C. Historically, the Pa'O wore colorful clothing until King Anawratha
Anawratha
defeated the Mon King, Makuta of Thaton
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Burmese Language
The Burmese language
Burmese language
(Burmese: မြန်မာဘာသာ, MLCTS: mranmabhasa, IPA: [mjəmà bàðà]) is the official language of Myanmar. Although the Constitution of Myanmar
Myanmar
officially recognizes the English name of the language as the Myanmar
Myanmar
language,[4] most English speakers continue to refer to the language as Burmese. In 2007, it was spoken as a first language by 34 million, primarily the Bamar (Burman) people and related ethnic groups, and as a second language by 10 million, particularly ethnic minorities in Myanmar
Myanmar
and neighboring countries. Burmese is a tonal, pitch-register, and syllable-timed language,[5] largely monosyllabic and analytic, with a subject–object–verb word order. It is a member of the Lolo-Burmese grouping of the Sino-Tibetan language family
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Tibeto-Burman
The Tibeto-Burman languages
Tibeto-Burman languages
are the non-Sinitic members of the Sino-Tibetan language family, over 400 of which are spoken throughout the highlands of Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
as well as certain parts of East Asia and South Asia. Around 60 million people speak Tibeto-Burman languages, around half of whom speak Burmese, and 13% of whom speak Tibetic languages.[1] The name derives from the most widely spoken of these languages, namely Burmese (over 32 million speakers) and the Tibetic languages
Tibetic languages
(over 8 million). These languages also have extensive literary traditions, dating from the 12th and 7th centuries respectively. Most of the other languages are spoken by much smaller communities, and many of them have not been described in detail. Some taxonomies divide Sino-Tibetan into Sinitic and Tibeto-Burman branches (e.g. Benedict, Matisoff)
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Zaiwa Language
Zaiwa (autonym: tsau˧˩va˥˩; Tsaiwa, Tsaiva, 载瓦) is a Burmish language spoken in parts of China
China
and Burma. There are around 100,000 speakers. It is also known as Atsi, its name in Jingpo. Other names for the language include Atzi, Azi, Aci, Aji, Atshi, Atsi-Maru, Maru, Zi, Tsaiwa, Szi and Xiaoshanhua.[3] Pela (Bola), with 400 speakers, was once classified as a dialect. From the 1950s Zaiwa was using Roman script. A Gospel of Mark was published in Zaiwa in 1951 in Roman script.[4].[5] Distribution[edit] There are more than 70,000 Zaiwa speakers in Yunnan, China, including in:[6]Bangwa 邦瓦, Longchuan County 陇川县 Zhanxi 盏西, Yingjiang County
Yingjiang County
盈江县 Xishan 西山, Luxi County 潞西县The Ethnologue
Ethnologue
lists Bengwa, Longzhun, and Tingzhu as dialects. In Myanmar, the Sadon (Sadung) dialect is the standard variety (Yabu 1982). Tones[edit] Zaiwa has five tones
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Hpon Language
Hpon (Hpun) is a moribund Burmish language
Burmish language
spoken by older adults in the gorges of the upper Irrawaddy River
Irrawaddy River
of Burma, north of Bhamo. There are two dialects, northern and southern. References[edit]^ a b Hpon at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Hpon". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. Henderson, Eugénie J. A. (1986). "Some hitherto unpublished material on Northern (Megyaw) Hpun." John McCoy and Timothy Light, eds. Contributions to Sino-Tibetan Studies: 101-134. Yabu Shirō 藪 司郎 (2003). The Hpun language endangered in Myanmar
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Lhao Vo Language
Lhao Vo, also known as Maru and Langsu (Chinese: 浪速), is a Burmish language of Burma
Burma
with a few thousand speakers in China.Contents1 Distribution 2 Varieties2.1 Langsong3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksDistribution[edit] Dai Qingxia (2005:3) reports 5,600 Langsu speakers in China
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Nang Khin Zay Yar
Nang Khin Zay Yar (Burmese: နန်းခင်ဇေယျာ; born in Taunggyi on March 4, 1988) is a Burmese model, actress and beauty pageant titleholder who won Miss Universe Myanmar title in 2012.[1] She is a Shan- Pa'O, which are ethnic minorities from Myanmar. She also won the Missosology's Miss International 2012 People's Choice Award, Pageantology.net Miss International 2012 People's Choice Award and Miss Internet Award in Miss International 2012, Okinawa.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Competitions4.1 Miss Myanmar 2012 4.2 Miss International 20125 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Nang Khin Zay Yar was born in Taunggyi on March 4, 1988 to her mother Nang Phyu Phyu Khine and her father Khun Aung Myat. Nang Khin Zay Yar went to Basic Education High School No. 4 Taunggyi. Nang Khin Zay Yar finished her education from Taunggyi University, earning her degree as a Bachelor of Laws
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Buddha
Gautama Buddha[note 3] (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama,[note 4] Shakyamuni Buddha,[4][note 5] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage,[4] on whose teachings Buddhism
Buddhism
was founded.[5] He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[6][note 6] Gautama taught a Middle Way
Middle Way
between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement[7] common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India
India
such as Magadha
Magadha
and Kosala.[6][8] Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism
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Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Mustard Plant
Mustard plants are any of several plant species in the genera Brassica and Sinapis
Sinapis
in the family Brassicaceae. Mustard seed
Mustard seed
is used as a spice. Grinding and mixing the seeds with water, vinegar, or other liquids creates the yellow condiment known as prepared mustard
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Cordia Dichotoma
Cordia
Cordia
dichotoma is a species of flowering tree in the borage family, Boraginaceae, that is native to the Indomalaya ecozone, northern Australia, and western Melanesia.[1] Common names include fragrant manjack, snotty gobbles, glue berry,anonang, pink pearl, bird lime tree, Indian cherry, Booch (Hindi), लसोड़ा Lasoda Tenti टेंटी, Dela डेला or Gunda (Hindi), Lasura (Nepali) and Bhokar (Marathi). The fruit is known as phoà-pò·-chí (破布子), 樹子仔, or 樹子 in Taiwan.Contents1 Description 2 Habitat and range 3 Ecology 4 Uses 5 Symbolism 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] Cordia
Cordia
dichotoma is a small to moderate-sized deciduous tree with a short bole and spreading crown. The stem bark is greyish brown, smooth or longitudinally wrinkled. Flowers are short-stalked, bisexual, white in colour which open only at night
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Mae Hong Son Province
Mae Hong Son
Mae Hong Son
Province (Thai: แม่ฮ่องสอน, pronounced [mɛ̂ː.hɔ̂ŋ.sɔ̌ːn]; formerly called Mae Rong Son), also spelled Maehongson, Mae Hong Sorn or Maehongsorn, is one of the northern provinces (changwat) of Thailand, on the country's western border. Neighboring provinces are (clockwise from north) Shan State of Myanmar, Chiang Mai
Chiang Mai
and Tak. To the west, the province borders Kayin State
Kayin State
and Kayah State
Kayah State
of Myanmar. Mae Hong Son's nickname is "the city of three mists". It is hemmed in by the high mountain ranges of the Shan Hills
Shan Hills
and is the most mountainous province in Thailand, occupying 13,814 square kilometres (5,334 sq mi). The province is often covered with mist
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Animism
Animism
Animism
(from Latin
Latin
anima, "breath, spirit, life")[1][2] is the religious belief that objects, places and creatures all possess a distinct spiritual essence.[3][4][5][6] Potentially, animism perceives all things—animals, plants, rocks, rivers, weather systems, human handiwork and perhaps even words—as animated and alive. Animism
Animism
is used in the anthropology of religion as a term for the belief system of many indigenous peoples,[7] especially in contrast to the relatively more recent development of organised religions.[8] Although each culture has its own different mythologies and rituals, "animism" is said to describe the most common, foundational thread of indigenous peoples' "spiritual" or "supernatural" perspectives
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Myanmar
Myanmar
Myanmar
(Burmese: [mjəmà]),[nb 1][8] officially the Republic
Republic
of the Union of Myanmar
Myanmar
and also known as Burma, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia. Myanmar
Myanmar
is bordered by India
India
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to its west, Thailand
Thailand
and Laos
Laos
to its east and China
China
to its north and northeast. To its south, about one third of Myanmar's total perimeter of 5,876 km (3,651 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline of 1,930 km (1,200 mi) along the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
and the Andaman Sea. The country's 2014 census counted the population to be 51 million people.[9] As of 2017, the population is about 54 million.[5] Myanmar is 676,578 square kilometres (261,228 square miles) in size
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Anawratha
Anawrahta Minsaw (Burmese: အနော်ရထာ မင်းစော, pronounced [ʔənɔ̀jətʰà mɪ́ɴ sɔ́]; 11 May 1014 – 11 April 1077) was the founder of the Pagan Empire. Considered the father of the Burmese nation, Anawrahta turned a small principality in the dry zone of Upper Burma into the first Burmese Empire that formed the basis of modern-day Burma (Myanmar).[2][3] Historically verifiable Burmese history begins with his accession to the Pagan throne in 1044.[4] Anawrahta unified the entire Irrawaddy valley for the first time in history, and placed peripheral regions such as the Shan States and Arakan (Northern Rakhine) under Pagan's suzerainty
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