HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Power7
POWER7 is a family of superscalar symmetric multiprocessors based on the Power Architecture
Power Architecture
released in 2010 that succeeded the POWER6. POWER7 was developed by IBM
IBM
at several sites including IBM's Rochester, MN; Austin, TX; Essex Junction, VT; T. J. Watson Research Center, NY; Bromont, QC[1] and IBM
IBM
Deutschland Research & Development GmbH, Böblingen, Germany laboratories. IBM
IBM
announced servers based on POWER7 on 8 February 2010.[2][3]Contents1 History 2 Design 3 Specifications 4 POWER7+ 5 Products 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] IBM
IBM
won a $244 million DARPA
DARPA
contract in November 2006 to develop a petascale supercomputer architecture before the end of 2010 in the HPCS project
[...More...]

"Power7" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

IBM
IBM
IBM
(International Business
Business
Machines Corporation) is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Armonk, New York, United States, with operations in over 170 countries. The company originated in 1911 as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company
Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company
(CTR) and was renamed "International Business
Business
Machines" in 1924. IBM
IBM
manufactures and markets computer hardware, middleware and software, and provides hosting and consulting services in areas ranging from mainframe computers to nanotechnology. IBM
IBM
is also a major research organization, holding the record for most U.S
[...More...]

"IBM" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

CPU Cache
A CPU cache[1] is a hardware cache used by the central processing unit (CPU) of a computer to reduce the average cost (time or energy) to access data from the main memory. A cache is a smaller, faster memory, closer to a processor core, which stores copies of the data from frequently used main memory locations. Most CPUs have different independent caches, including instruction and data caches, where the data cache is usually organized as a hierarchy of more cache levels (L1, L2, etc.). All modern (fast) CPUs (with few specialized exceptions[2]) have multiple levels of CPU caches. The first CPUs that used a cache had only one level of cache; unlike later level 1 caches, it was not split into L1d (for data) and L1i (for instructions). Almost all current CPUs with caches have a split L1 cache. They also have L2 caches and, for larger processors, L3 caches as well
[...More...]

"CPU Cache" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

OpenPOWER Foundation
The OpenPOWER Foundation
OpenPOWER Foundation
is a collaboration around Power Architecture products initiated by IBM
IBM
and announced as the "OpenPOWER Consortium" on August 6, 2013.[1] IBM
IBM
is opening up technology surrounding their Power Architecture
Power Architecture
offerings, such as processor specifications, firmware and software and is offering this on a liberal license and they will be using a collaborative development model with their partners.[2][3] The goal stated is to enable the server vendor ecosystem to build their own customized server, networking and storage hardware for future data centers and cloud computing.[4] Power.org is still the governing body around the Power Architecture instruction set but specific implementations are now free to use under a liberal license granted by IBM
[...More...]

"OpenPOWER Foundation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Reduced Instruction Set Computing
A reduced instruction set computer, or RISC (pronounced 'risk', /ɹɪsk/), is one whose instruction set architecture (ISA) allows it to have fewer cycles per instruction (CPI) than a complex instruction set computer (CISC).[1] Various suggestions have been made regarding a precise definition of RISC, but the general concept is that such a computer has a small set of simple and general instructions, rather than a large set of complex and specialized instructions. Another common RISC trait is their load/store architecture,[2] in which memory is accessed through specific instructions rather than as a part of most instructions. Although a number of computers from the 1960s and '70s have been identified as forerunners of RISCs, the modern concept dates to the 1980s
[...More...]

"Reduced Instruction Set Computing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Blue Gene
Blue Gene
Blue Gene
is an IBM
IBM
project aimed at designing supercomputers that can reach operating speeds in the P FLOPS (petaFLOPS) range, with low power consumption. The project created three generations of supercomputers, Blue Gene/L, Blue Gene/P, and Blue Gene/Q. Blue Gene
Blue Gene
systems have often led the TOP500[1] and Green500[2] rankings of the most powerful and most power efficient supercomputers, respectively. Blue Gene
Blue Gene
systems have also consistently scored top positions in the Graph500 list.[3] The project was awarded the 2009 National Medal of Technology and Innovation.[4] As of 2015, IBM
IBM
seems to have ended the development of the Blue Gene family[5] though no public announcement has been made
[...More...]

"Blue Gene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Central Processing Unit
A central processing unit (CPU) is the electronic circuitry within a computer that carries out the instructions of a computer program by performing the basic arithmetic, logical, control and input/output (I/O) operations specified by the instructions. The computer industry has used the term "central processing unit" at least since the early 1960s.[1] Traditionally, the term "CPU" refers to a processor, more specifically to its processing unit and control unit (CU), distinguishing these core elements of a computer from external components such as main memory and I/O
I/O
circuitry.[2] The form, design, and implementation of CPUs have changed over the course of their history, but their fundamental operation remains almost unchanged
[...More...]

"Central Processing Unit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Power Architecture Platform Reference
Power Architecture
Power Architecture
Platform Reference (PAPR) is an initiative from Power.org to make a new open computing platform based on Power Architecture technology. It follows two previous attempts made in the 1990s, PReP and CHRP. The PAPR specification provides the foundation for development of standard Power Architecture
Power Architecture
server computers. Various operating systems like Linux
Linux
and IBM AIX
IBM AIX
rely on the PAPR interface to run on Power-based hardware. PAPR is Power.org's move toward what IBM did originally with PReP, in that it defines a common hardware definition and software/firmware platform under a set of requirements
[...More...]

"Power Architecture Platform Reference" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Instruction Set
An instruction set architecture (ISA) is an abstract model of a computer. It is also referred to as architecture or computer architecture. A realization of an ISA is called an implementation. An ISA permits multiple implementations that may vary in performance, physical size, and monetary cost (among other things); because the ISA serves as the interface between software and hardware. Software
Software
that has been written for an ISA can run on different implementations of the same ISA. This has enabled binary compatibility between different generations of computers to be easily achieved, and the development of computer families. Both of these developments have helped to lower the cost of computers and to increase their applicability. For these reasons, the ISA is one of the most important abstractions in computing today. An ISA defines everything a machine language programmer needs to know in order to program a computer
[...More...]

"Instruction Set" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Clock Rate
The clock speed typically refers to the frequency at which a chip like a central processing unit (CPU), one core of a multi-core processor, is running and is used as an indicator of the processor's speed. It is measured in clock cycles per second or its equivalent, the SI unit hertz (Hz), the clock rate of the first generation of computers was measured in hertz or kilohertz (kHz), but in the 21st century the speed of modern CPUs is commonly advertised in gigahertz (GHz)
[...More...]

"Clock Rate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

RAD5500
The RAD5500 is a radiation-hardened 64-bit multi-core processor platform manufactured by BAE Systems Electronics, Intelligence & Support with Power Architecture-based technologies from IBM
IBM
and Freescale Semiconductor.[1][2][4] Successor of the RAD750, the RAD5500 processor platform is for use in high radiation environments experienced on board satellites and spacecraft. The RAD5500 platform supports VPX high speed connectors, DDR2/DDR3 memory, serialize/deserialize (SerDes), and SpaceWire IO.[5]Contents1 Processors1.1 RAD5510 and RAD5515 1.2 RAD5545 1.3 RADSPEED-HB (host bridge)2 See also 3 ReferencesProcessors[edit] The RAD5500 family of radiation-hardened processors use the QorIQ Power Architecture
Power Architecture
with processor cores based on versions of the Freescale Technologies e5500 core
[...More...]

"RAD5500" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

PowerPC 7xx
The PowerPC
PowerPC
7xx is a family of third generation 32-bit PowerPC microprocessors designed and manufactured by IBM
IBM
and Motorola
Motorola
(now Freescale Semiconductor). This family is called the PowerPC
PowerPC
G3 by its well-known customer Apple Inc., which introduced it on November 10, 1997. The term " PowerPC
PowerPC
G3" is often, and incorrectly, imagined to be a microprocessor when in fact a number of microprocessors from different vendors have been used. Such designations were applied to Macintosh
Macintosh
computers such as the PowerBook G3, the multicolored iMacs, iBooks and several desktops, including both the Beige and Blue and White Power Macintosh
Macintosh
G3s
[...More...]

"PowerPC 7xx" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

PowerPC G4
PowerPC
PowerPC
G4 is a designation used by Apple Computer
Apple Computer
and Eyetech to describe a fourth generation of 32-bit PowerPC
PowerPC
microprocessors. Apple has applied this name to various (though closely related) processor models from Freescale, a former part of Motorola. Motorola
Motorola
and Freescale's proper name of this family of processors is PowerPC
PowerPC
74xx. Macintosh computers such as the PowerBook G4
PowerBook G4
and iBook G4 laptops and the Power Mac G4
Power Mac G4
and Power Mac G4
Power Mac G4
Cube desktops all took their name from the processor
[...More...]

"PowerPC G4" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

PowerPC 970
The PowerPC
PowerPC
970, PowerPC
PowerPC
970FX, PowerPC
PowerPC
970GX, and PowerPC
PowerPC
970MP, are 64-bit Power Architecture
Power Architecture
processors from IBM
IBM
introduced in 2002. When used in Apple Inc.
Apple Inc.
machines, they were dubbed the PowerPC
PowerPC
G5. The 970 family was created through a collaboration between IBM
IBM
and Apple.[1][2] The project went under the codename GP-UL or Giga Processor Ultra Light, where Giga Processor was the codename for the POWER4
POWER4
from which the core was derived
[...More...]

"PowerPC 970" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

IBM RS64
The IBM RS64 is a family of microprocessors that were used in the late 1990s in IBM's RS/6000
RS/6000
and AS/400
AS/400
servers. These microprocessors implement the "Amazon", or "PowerPC-AS", instruction set architecture (ISA)
[...More...]

"IBM RS64" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

IBM RAD6000
The RAD6000 radiation-hardened single board computer, based on the IBM RISC Single Chip
RISC Single Chip
CPU, was manufactured by IBM
IBM
Federal Systems. IBM Federal Systems was sold to Loral, and by way of acquisition, ended up with Lockheed Martin
Lockheed Martin
and is currently a part of BAE Systems
BAE Systems
United States subsidiary BAE Systems Inc.
BAE Systems Inc.
operating group BAE Systems Electronics, Intelligence & Support
[...More...]

"IBM RAD6000" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.