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Oxford Union
The Oxford
Oxford
Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Oxford Union, is a debating society in the city of Oxford, England, whose membership is drawn primarily from the University of Oxford
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Robert Greene (American Author)
Robert Greene (born May 14, 1959) is an American author known for his books on strategy, power and seduction.[1][2] He has written five international bestsellers: The 48 Laws of Power, The Art of Seduction, The 33 Strategies of War, The 50th Law (with rapper 50 Cent) and Mastery.[3]Contents1 Early life 2 Books2.1 The 48 Laws of Power 2.2 The Art of Seduction 2.3 The 33 Strategies of War 2.4 The 50th Law 2.5 Mastery3 Influence and controversy 4 Personal life 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] The younger son of Jewish parents,[4] Greene grew up in Los Angeles and attended University of California, Berkeley before finishing his degree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a B.A
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Ripon College, Cuddesdon
Ripon College Cuddesdon is a Church of England theological college in Cuddesdon, a village 5.5 miles (8.9 km) outside Oxford, England. It is the largest ministry training institution in the Church of England.Contents1 History1.1 Cuddesdon College 1.2 Ripon Hall 1.3 Ripon College Cuddesdon2 Present 3 Bishop Edward King Chapel 4 List of principals 5 Notable former staff 6 Notable alumni 7 Sources and further reading 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Ripon College Cuddesdon was formed from an amalgamation in 1975 of Cuddesdon College and Ripon Hall. The name of the college, which is incorporated by royal charter, deliberately contains no comma. Cuddesdon College[edit] Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford, founded Cuddesdon College in April 1853, as the Oxford Diocesan Seminary to train graduates from Oxford and Cambridge. Its original buildings, designed by the Diocesan Architect for Oxford G. E. Street, were built opposite the Cuddesdon Palace
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House Of Commons Of The United Kingdom
The House of Commons
House of Commons
is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Offices however extend to Portcullis House
Portcullis House
due to shortage of space. The Commons is an elected body consisting of 650 members known as Members of Parliament (MPs). Members are elected to represent constituencies by first-past-the-post and hold their seats until Parliament is dissolved. The House of Commons
House of Commons
of England
England
evolved in the 13th and 14th centuries
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Vladimir Ashkenazy
Vladimir Davidovich Ashkenazy (Russian: Влади́мир Дави́дович Ашкена́зи, Vladimir Davidovich Ashkenazi; born 6 July 1937) is an internationally recognized solo pianist, chamber music performer, and conductor. He is originally from Russia
Russia
and has held Icelandic citizenship since 1972. He has lived in Switzerland since 1978. Ashkenazy has collaborated with well-known orchestras and soloists. In addition, he has recorded a large storehouse of classical and romantic works
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Holywell Music Room
The Holywell Music Room
Holywell Music Room
is the city of Oxford's chamber music hall, situated on Holywell Street
Holywell Street
in the city centre, within the grounds of Wadham College.[1] It is said to be the oldest purpose-built music room in Europe, and hence Britain's first concert hall.[1] It was built in 1748, designed by Dr Thomas Camplin, the vice-principal of St Edmund Hall.[1] The venue was important for popularizing the music of Haydn
Haydn
in 18th century England. He was the most frequently performed composer during 1788-1791; at short notice he was unable to attend a planned visit to the venue while in Oxford in 1791.[2][3] The auditorium includes an organ and U-shaped raked seating. The building was Grade II* listed
Grade II* listed
in 1954.[4] See also[edit]Sheldonian Theatre Jacqueline Du Pré Music BuildingReferences[edit]^ a b c Tyack, Geoffrey (1998)
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Oxford University Music Society
The Oxford University Music Society (OUMS)[1] is one of the oldest societies in the University of Oxford, England, tracing its origins back to 1872. The Society was formed in 1916 by the merger of the Oxford University Musical Club, founded in 1872, and the Oxford University Musical Union, founded in 1884. Originally called the Oxford University Musical Club and Union, it changed its name to the Oxford University Musical Society in 1983.[2]Contents1 Overview 2 See also 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksOverview[edit] The Oxford University Musical Club ran the Public Classical Concerts series from 1891 to 1914.[3] These led to the Oxford Subscription Concerts series subsequently
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Oxford Blues
Oxford
Oxford
Blues is a 1984 British comedy-drama sports film written and directed by Robert Boris and starring Rob Lowe, Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy
and Amanda Pays. It is a remake of the 1938 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
film A Yank at Oxford.Contents1 Plot 2 Production details 3 Cast list 4 Reception 5 References 6 External linksPlot[edit] Nick Di Angelo (Rob Lowe) is working in a Las Vegas casino to earn enough money to pursue the woman of his dreams – Lady Victoria Wingate (Amanda Pays) – to Oxford, England, where, he believes, the only way to win her is to get into Oxford
Oxford
University and join the rowing team
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The Madness Of King George
The Madness of King George
The Madness of King George
is a 1994 British biographical historical comedy-drama film directed by Nicholas Hytner and adapted by Alan Bennett from his own play, The Madness of George III. It tells the true story of George III of Great Britain's deteriorating mental health, and his equally declining relationship with his eldest son, the Prince of Wales, particularly focusing on the period around the Regency Crisis of 1788–89
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Gothic Revival Architecture
Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic or neo-Gothic) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England. Its popularity grew rapidly in the early 19th century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval Gothic architecture, in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time
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Oxford Union Murals
Oxford
Oxford
(/ˈɒksfərd/)[3][4] is a city in the South East region of England
England
and the county town of Oxfordshire. With an estimated 2016 population of 170,350, it is the 52nd largest city in the United Kingdom,[5][6] and one of the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse.[7][8] The city is situated 57 miles (92 km) from London, 69 miles (111 km) from Bristol, 65 miles (105 km) from both Southampton
Southampton
and Birmingham
Birmingham
and 25 miles (40 km) from Reading. The city is known worldwide as the home of the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.[9] Buildings in Oxford
Oxford
demonstrate notable examples of every English architectural period since the late Saxon period. Oxford
Oxford
is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold
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Oxford
Oxford
Oxford
(/ˈɒksfərd/)[3][4] is a city in the South East region of England
England
and the county town of Oxfordshire. With an estimated 2016 population of 170,350, it is the 52nd largest city in the United Kingdom,[5][6] and one of the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse.[7][8] The city is situated 57 miles (92 km) from London, 69 miles (111 km) from Bristol, 65 miles (105 km) from both Southampton
Southampton
and Birmingham
Birmingham
and 25 miles (40 km) from Reading. The city is known worldwide as the home of the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.[9] Buildings in Oxford
Oxford
demonstrate notable examples of every English architectural period since the late Saxon period. Oxford
Oxford
is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold
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Benjamin Woodward
Benjamin Woodward
Benjamin Woodward
(November 16, 1816 - May 15, 1861) was an Irish architect who, in partnership with Sir Thomas Newenham Deane, designed a number of buildings in Dublin, Cork and Oxford.Contents1 Life 2 Notes 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife[edit] Woodward was born in Tullamore, King's County (Offaly), Ireland. He trained as an engineer but developed an interest in medieval architecture, producing measured drawings of Holy Cross Abbey in County Tipperary. These drawings were exhibited at the RIBA in London in 1846. The same year he joined the office of Sir Thomas Deane
Thomas Deane
and became a partner in 1851 along with Deane's son, Thomas Newenham Deane
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Salman Rushdie
Sir
Sir
Ahmed Salman Rushdie[a] FRSL (born 19 June 1947) is a British Indian novelist and essayist. His second novel, Midnight's Children (1981), won the Booker Prize
Booker Prize
in 1981 and was deemed to be "the best novel of all winners" on two separate occasions, marking the 25th and the 40th anniversary of the prize. Much of his fiction is set on the Indian subcontinent. He combines magical realism with historical fiction; his work is concerned with the many connections, disruptions, and migrations between Eastern and Western civilizations. His fourth novel, The Satanic Verses
The Satanic Verses
(1988), was the subject of a major controversy, provoking protests from Muslims in several countries. Death threats were made against him, including a fatwā calling for his assassination issued by Ayatollah
Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini, the Supreme Leader of Iran, on 14 February 1989
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Bonfire Night
Bonfire
Bonfire
Night is a name given to various annual celebrations characterised by bonfires and fireworks.[1] The event celebrates different traditions on different dates, depending on the country. Some of the most popular instances include Guy Fawkes Night
Guy Fawkes Night
(5 November) in Great Britain, which is also celebrated in some Commonwealth countries; Northern Ireland's Eleventh Night
Eleventh Night
(11 July), and 5 November in Newfoundland and Labrador. Often known as St John's Eve (23 June), a similar bonfire tradition survives in parts of Ireland as well as Scandinavia
Scandinavia
where it is known as Walpurgis Night (30 April). St John's Eve
St John's Eve
is also a very important celebration in Spain
Spain
and Northern Portugal
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Charitable Trust
SectionsAttestation clauseResiduary clauseIncorporation by referenceContestTestamentary capacityUndue influenceInsane delusion FraudNo-contest clauseProperty dispositionLapse and anti-lapseAdemption AbatementSatisfaction of legaciesActs of independent significanceElective share Pretermitted heirWills and conflict of lawsTrustsExpress ResultingConstructiveCommon typesBare DiscretionaryAccumulation and maintenanceInterest in possessionCharitable Purpose IncentiveOther typesProtective SpendthriftLife insurance RemainderLife interestReversionary interestTestamentaryHonorary Asset-protection Special
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