HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Outline Of Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(Pali/Sanskrit: बौद्ध धर्म Buddha Dharma) is a religion and philosophy encompassing a variety of traditions, beliefs and practices, largely based on teachings attributed to Siddhartha Gautama, commonly known as the Buddha, "the awakened one". The following outline is provided as an overview of, and topical guide to, Buddhism.Contents1 The Buddha 2 Branches of Buddhism2.1 Schools of Buddhism2.1.1 Theravāda 2.1.2 Mahāyāna 2.1.3 Vajrayāna 2.1.4 Early Buddhist schools 2.1.5 Buddhist modernism2.2
[...More...]

"Outline Of Buddhism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old Age
Old age
Old age
refers to ages nearing or surpassing the life expectancy of human beings, and is thus the end of the human life cycle
[...More...]

"Old Age" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Death
Death
Death
is the cessation of all biological functions that sustain a living organism.[citation needed] Phenomena which commonly bring about death include aging, predation, malnutrition, disease, suicide, homicide, starvation, dehydration, and accidents or trauma resulting in terminal injury.[1] In most cases, bodies of living organisms begin to decompose shortly after death.[2] Death
Death
– particularly the death of humans – has commonly been considered a sad or unpleasant occasion, due to the affection for the being that has died and the termination of social and familial bonds with the deceased. Other concerns include fear of death, necrophobia, anxiety, sorrow, grief, emotional pain, depression, sympathy, compassion, solitude, or saudade
[...More...]

"Death" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sapphire (color)
Sapphire
Sapphire
is a saturated shade of blue, referring to the gem of the same name. Sapphire
Sapphire
gems are most commonly found in a range of blue shades although they can be many different colors
[...More...]

"Sapphire (color)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Golden Yellow
Gold, also called golden, is a colour. The web color gold is sometimes referred to as golden to distinguish it from the color metallic gold. The use of gold as a color term in traditional usage is more often applied to the color "metallic gold" (shown below). The first recorded use of golden as a color name in English was in 1300 to refer to the element gold and in 1423 to refer to blond hair.[1] Metallic gold, such as in paint, is often called goldtone or gold tone. In heraldry, the French word or is used.[2] In model building, the color gold is different from brass. A shiny or metallic silvertone object can be painted with transparent yellow to obtain goldtone, something often done with Christmas decorations.Contents1 Metallic gold1.1 Gold (metallic gold) 1.2 Web color gold vs
[...More...]

"Golden Yellow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sanskrit Language
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
[...More...]

"Sanskrit Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gautama Buddha In Hinduism
In Vaishnava Hinduism, the historic Buddha
Buddha
or Gautama Buddha, is considered to be an avatar of the Hindu god Vishnu.[1] Of the ten major avatars of Vishnu, Vaishnavites believe Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha
to be the ninth and most recent incarnation.[2][3] Buddha's portrayal in Hinduism varies. In some texts such as the Puranas, he is portrayed as an avatar born to mislead those who deny the Vedic knowledge.[3][4][note 1] In others, such as the 13th-century Gitagovinda of Vaishnava poet Jayadeva, Vishnu
Vishnu
incarnates as the Buddha
Buddha
to teach and to end animal slaughter.[2] In contemporary Hinduism, state Constance Jones and James D
[...More...]

"Gautama Buddha In Hinduism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crimson
HTML/CSS[1]Crimson #DC143CB: Normalized to [0–255] (byte) H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred) Crimson
Crimson
is a strong, red color, inclining to purple
[...More...]

"Crimson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Outline (list)
An outline, also called a hierarchical outline, is a list arranged to show hierarchical relationships and is a type of tree structure. An outline is used[1] to present the main points (in sentences) or topics (terms) of a given subject. Each item in an outline may be divided into additional sub-items. If an organizational level in an outline is to be sub-divided, it shall have at least two subcategories, as advised by major style manuals in current use.[2] An outline may be used as a drafting tool of a document, or as a summary of the content of a document or of the knowledge in an entire field. It is not to be confused with the general context of the term "outline", which a summary or overview of a subject, presented verbally or written in prose[3] (for example, The Outline of History
The Outline of History
is not an outline of the type presented below)
[...More...]

"Outline (list)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

White
White
White
is the lightest color and is achromatic (having no hue), because it fully reflects and scatters all the visible wavelengths of light. It is the color of fresh snow, chalk, and milk, and is the opposite of black. In ancient Egypt
Egypt
and ancient Rome, priestesses wore white as a symbol of purity, and Romans wore a white toga as a symbol of citizenship. In the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and Renaissance a white unicorn symbolized chastity, and a white lamb sacrifice and purity. It was the royal color of the Kings of France, and of the monarchist movement that opposed the Bolsheviks
Bolsheviks
during the Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
(1917–1922)
[...More...]

"White" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scarlet (color)
X11 hex=FF2400B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)Scarlet is a brilliant red color with a tinge of orange.[1][2][3] In the spectrum of visible light, and on the traditional color wheel, it is one-quarter of the way between red and orange, slightly less orange than vermilion.[4] According to surveys in Europe
Europe
and the United States, scarlet and other bright shades of red are the colors most associated with courage, force, passion, heat, and joy.[5] In the Roman Catholic Church, scarlet is the color worn by a cardinal, and is associated with the blood of Christ and the Christi
[...More...]

"Scarlet (color)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Śuddhodana
Śuddhodana
Śuddhodana
(Sanskrit: शुद्धोधन ศุทฺโธธน; Pali: Suddhōdana สุทฺโธทน; Sinhalese: සුද්ධෝදන මහ රජතුමා), meaning "he who grows pure rice,"[3] was a leader of the Shakya, who lived in an oligarchic republic with their capital at Kapilavastu. He was also the father of Siddhartha, who later became known as Gautama Buddha.[4] In later renditions of the life of the Buddha, Śuddhodana
Śuddhodana
was often referred to as a king, though that status cannot be established with confidence and is in fact disputed by modern scholarship.Contents1 Family 2 Biography2.1 Questions of royal status 2.2 Siddhartha's birth and Great Renunciation 2.3 Later life3 References 4 External linksFamily[edit]This section describes a work or element of fiction in a primarily in-universe style
[...More...]

"Śuddhodana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Asceticism
Asceticism
Asceticism
(/əˈsɛtɪsɪzəm/; from the Greek: ἄσκησις áskesis, "exercise, training") is a lifestyle characterized by abstinence from sensual pleasures, often for the purpose of pursuing spiritual goals. Ascetics may withdraw from the world for their practices or continue to be part of their society, but typically adopt a frugal lifestyle, characterised by the renunciation of material possessions and physical pleasures, and time spent fasting while concentrating on the practice of religion or reflection upon spiritual matters.[3] Asceticism
Asceticism
is classified into two types
[...More...]

"Asceticism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Illness
A disease is a particular abnormal condition that affects part or all of an organism not caused by external force[1][2] (see 'injury') and that consists of a disorder of a structure or function, usually serving as an evolutionary disadvantage. The study of disease is called pathology, which includes the study of cause. Disease
Disease
is often construed as a medical condition associated with specific symptoms and signs.[3] It may be caused by external factors such as pathogens or by internal dysfunctions, particularly of the immune system, such as an immunodeficiency, or by a hypersensitivity, including allergies and autoimmunity. When caused by pathogens (e.g. malaria by Plasmodium ssp.), the term disease is often misleadingly used even in the scientific literature in place of its causal agent, the pathogen
[...More...]

"Illness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Buddhism In Southeast Asia
Buddhism in Southeast Asia includes a variety of traditions of Buddhism including two main traditions: Mahāyāna Buddhism and Theravāda Buddhism. Historically, Mahāyāna Buddhism had a prominent position in this region, but in modern times most countries follow the Theravāda tradition. Southeast Asian countries with a Theravāda Buddhist majority are Sri Lanka, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Myanmar.[1] Vietnam continues to have a Mahāyāna majority due to Chinese influence.[2] Indonesia was Mahāyāna Buddhist since the time of the Sailendra and Srivijaya empires,[3] but now Mahāyāna Buddhism in Indonesia is now largely practiced by the Chinese diaspora, as in Singapore and Malaysia. Mahāyāna Buddhism is the predominant religion of most Chinese communities in Singapore
[...More...]

"Buddhism In Southeast Asia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Miracles Of Gautama Buddha
According to Buddhist texts, Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha
possessed several superhuman powers and abilities; however, due to an understanding of the workings of the skeptical mind and how the display of miracles can be abused by unscrupulous people, he reportedly responded to a request for miracles by saying, "...I dislike, reject and despise them,"[1] and refused to comply.Contents1 Miraculous birth 2 Other miracles 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksMiraculous birth[edit] Main article: Miraculous birthsThe infant Buddha taking the Seven Steps
[...More...]

"Miracles Of Gautama Buddha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.