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Osred I Of Northumbria
Osred (c. 697 – 716) was king of Northumbria from 705 until his death. He was the son of King Aldfrith of Northumbria. Aldfrith's only known wife was Cuthburh, but it is not known for certain whether Osred was her son. Osred did not directly succeed his father as Eadwulf seized the throne, but held it for only a few months. At the time that the usurper Eadwulf was overthrown, Osred was only a child, and the government was controlled by the powerful Bishop Wilfrid, presumably assisted by ealdormen such as Berhtfrith son of Berhtred. Osred was adopted as Wilfrid's son at this time
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Libertine
A libertine is one devoid of most moral or sexual restraints, which are seen as unnecessary or undesirable, especially one who ignores or even spurns accepted morals and forms of behaviour sanctified by the larger society.[1][2] Libertinism is described as an extreme form of hedonism.[3] Libertines put value on physical pleasures, meaning those experienced through the senses. As a philosophy, libertinism gained new-found adherents in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, particularly in France
France
and Great Britain
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Deira
Deira
Deira
(Old English: Derenrice or Dere) was a Celtic kingdom – first recorded (but much older) by the Anglo-Saxons in 559 AD and lasted til 664 AD,[1] in Northern England
Northern England
that was first recorded when Anglian warriors invaded the Derwent Valley in the third quarter of the fifth century.[2] It extended from the Humber
Humber
to the Tees, and from the sea to the western edge of the Vale of York
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Prosopography Of Anglo-Saxon England
The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
(PASE) is a database and associated website that aims to collate everything that was written in contemporary records about anyone who lived in Anglo-Saxon England, in a prosopography.[1]
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
is a collection of annals in Old English chronicling the history of the Anglo-Saxons. The original manuscript of the Chronicle was created late in the 9th century, probably in Wessex, during the reign of Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
(r. 871–899). Multiple copies were made of that one original and then distributed to monasteries across England, where they were independently updated. In one case, the Chronicle was still being actively updated in 1154. Nine manuscripts survive in whole or in part, though not all are of equal historical value and none of them is the original version. The oldest seems to have been started towards the end of Alfred's reign, while the most recent was written at Peterborough Abbey after a fire at that monastery in 1116
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Josiah
Josiah
Josiah
(/dʒoʊˈsaɪ.ə/ or /dʒəˈzaɪ.ə/)[1][2] or Yoshiyahu[a] was a seventh-century BCE king of Judah (c. 649–609) who, according to the Hebrew Bible, instituted major religious reforms. Josiah
Josiah
is credited by most biblical scholars with having established or compiled important Hebrew Scriptures
Hebrew Scriptures
during the "Deuteronomic reform" which probably occurred during his rule
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Bede
Bede
Bede
(/biːd/ BEED; Old English: Bǣda, Bēda; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable
Venerable
Bede, and Bede
Bede
the Venerable (Latin: Bēda Venerābilis), was an English monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom of Northumbria of the Angles
Angles
(contemporarily Monkwearmouth– Jarrow
Jarrow
Abbey in Tyne and Wear, England). Born on lands likely belonging to the Monkwearmouth monastery, Bede
Bede
was sent there at the age of seven and later joined Abbot
Abbot
Ceolfrith
Ceolfrith
at the Jarrow
Jarrow
monastery, both of whom survived a plague that struck in 686, an outbreak that killed a majority of the population there
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Ecclesiastical
In Christian theology, ecclesiology is the study of the Christian Church, the origins of Christianity, its relationship to Jesus, its role in salvation, its polity, its discipline, its destiny, and its leadership
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River Forth
The River Forth
River Forth
is a major river, 47 km (29 mi) long, whose drainage basin covers much of Stirlingshire
Stirlingshire
in Scotland's Central Belt.[1] The Gaelic name is Abhainn Dubh, meaning "black river", in the upper reach above Stirling. Below the tidal reach,[2] (just after being crossed by the M9 motorway) its name is Uisge For. The Forth rises in the Trossachs, a mountainous area 30 km (19 mi) west of Stirling. Ben Lomond's eastern slopes drain into the Duchray Water
Duchray Water
which meets with Avondhu River coming from Loch Ard. The confluence of these two streams is the nominal start of the River Forth.[3] From there it flows roughly eastward, through Aberfoyle, joining with the Kelty Water, about 5 km further downstream. The vast flat expanse of the Carse
Carse
of Stirling
Stirling
follows including Flanders Moss
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Picts
The Picts
Picts
was the name given to an unidentified tribal confederation of peoples who lived in what is today eastern and northern Scotland during the Late Iron Age
Iron Age
and Early Medieval periods. They are thought to have been ethnolinguistically Celtic. Where they lived and what their culture was like can be inferred from the geographical distribution of brochs, Brittonic place name elements, and Pictish stones. The name Picts
Picts
appears in written records from Late Antiquity to the 10th century, when they are thought to have merged with the Gaels
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Ealdorman
An ealdorman (from Old English ealdorman, lit. "elder man"; plural: "ealdormen") was a high-ranking royal official and prior magistrate of an Anglo-Saxon shire or group of shires from about the ninth century to the time of King Cnut. The term "ealdorman" was rendered in Latin as dux in early West Saxon charters, and as præfectus (which is also the equivalent of gerefa, modern reeve, from which sheriff or shire reeve is derived)
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Bernicia
Bernicia
Bernicia
(Old English: Bernice, Bryneich, Beornice; Latin: Bernicia) was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom established by Anglian settlers of the 6th century in what is now southeastern Scotland
Scotland
and North East England. The Anglian territory of Bernicia
Bernicia
was approximately equivalent to the modern English counties of Northumberland
Northumberland
and Durham, and the Scottish counties of Berwickshire
Berwickshire
and East Lothian, stretching from the Forth to the Tees
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Rædwulf Of Northumbria
Rædwulf was king of Northumbria
Northumbria
for a short time. His descent is not known, but it is possible that he was a kinsman of Osberht and Ælla.Copper alloy of styca of King RaedwulfRædwulf became king when Æthelred son of Eanred was deposed. Coins from his reign are known, but other than the report in the Roger of Wendover's Flores Historiarum
Flores Historiarum
of his death fighting pagans (i.e. Vikings), nothing more is recorded of him. Annals incorporated in Flores Historiarum
Flores Historiarum
date this reign to 844, but the annalist's chronology is not necessarily reliable. The recent discovery of a coin of King Eanred, dated on stylistic grounds to circa 850, led to a reappraisal of the reigns of Northumbrian rulers in the 9th century.[1] As a result, Rædwulf's reign is now thought to have been c
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Ælfwald II Of Northumbria
Ælfwald, according to one tradition, reigned as king of Northumbria following the deposition of Eardwulf in 806. This information appears only in the anonymous tract De primo Saxonum adventu and in the later Flores Historiarum
Flores Historiarum
of Roger of Wendover. Roger states that Ælfwald had overthrown Eardwulf. Ælfwald allegedly reigned for two years before Eardwulf returned, restored to power with the aid of the Emperor Charlemagne
Charlemagne
and of Pope Leo III. Alternatively, Eardwulf's son Eanred may have succeeded to the throne, rather than Eardwulf. While only late and exiguous written sources for Ælfwald's reign have survived, modest numbers of coins from his reign exist - minted at York
York
by a moneyer named Cuthheard, who also produced all known coins of Eardwulf's reign. Lakeland author W. G. Collingwood
W. G

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