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Oscar Romero
Óscar Arnulfo Romero y Galdámez (15 August 1917 – 24 March 1980) was a prelate of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in El Salvador, who served as the fourth Archbishop of San Salvador. He spoke out against poverty, social injustice, assassinations, and torture. In 1980, Romero was assassinated while offering Mass in the chapel of the Hospital of Divine Providence
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Óscar Romero (footballer)
Óscar David Romero Villamayor (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈoskar roˈmeɾo]; born 4 July 1992) is a Paraguayan professional footballer who plays as an attacking midfielder for Chinese club Shanghai Shenhua. He is the twin brother of Ángel Romero.[1]Contents1 Career1.1 Club Cerro Porteño 1.2 Racing Club2 International goals 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Romero was in the youth ranks of Boca Juniors when he was a Sub 15, but could not continue at the club for a matter of paperwork, therefore he did not play for the Xeneize. Club Cerro Porteño[edit] Romero joined the youth ranks of Club Cerro Porteño at the age of 14. He debuted in the First Division of Paraguay on 15 May 2011 in a 1–0 defeat against General Caballero SC of Zeballos Cue. He scored his first goal on 1 December 2012 against Sportivo Luqueño
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Mass (liturgy)
Mass is a term used to describe the main eucharistic liturgical service in many forms of Western Christianity. The term mass is commonly used in the Catholic Church[1] and Anglican churches,[2] as well as some Lutheran churches,[3] Methodist,[4][5] Western Rite Orthodox and Old Catholic churches. Some Protestants employ terms such as Divine Service or service of worship, rather than the word Mass.[6] For the celebration of the Eucharist
Eucharist
in Eastern Christianity, including Eastern Catholic Churches, other terms such as Divine Liturgy, Holy Qurbana, and Badarak are typically used instead.Contents1 Etymology 2 Mass in the Catholic Church2.1 Introductory rites 2.2 Liturgy
Liturgy
of the Word 2.3 Liturgy
Liturgy
of the Eucharist 2.4 Communion rite 2.5 Concluding rite3 Mass in the Western Rite Orthodox Churches3.1 Divine Liturgy
Divine Liturgy
of St
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Liberation Theology
Liberation theology is a synthesis of Christian theology
Christian theology
and Marxist socio-economic analyses that emphasizes social concern for the poor and the political liberation for oppressed peoples.[1] In the 1950s and the 1960s, liberation theology was the political praxis of Latin American theologians, such as Gustavo Gutiérrez
Gustavo Gutiérrez
of Peru, Leonardo Boff of Brazil, Juan Luis Segundo
Juan Luis Segundo
of Uruguay, and Jon Sobrino
Jon Sobrino
of Spain, who made popular the phrase the "Preferential option for the poor". The Latin American context also produced Evangelical advocates of Liberation Theology, such as C. René Padilla of Ecuador, Samuel Escobar of Peru, and Orlando E. Costas of Puerto Rico, who, in the 1970s, called for integral mission, emphasizing evangelism and social responsibility
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Opus Dei
Opus Dei, formally known as The Prelature of the Holy Cross and Opus Dei (Latin: Praelatura Sanctae Crucis et Operis Dei), is an institution of the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
which teaches that everyone is called to holiness and that ordinary life is a path to sanctity.[2][3] The majority of its membership are lay people, with secular priests under the governance of a prelate elected by specific members and appointed by the Pope.[4] Opus Dei
Opus Dei
is Latin for "Work of God"; hence the organization is often referred to by members and supporters as the Work.[5][6] Opus Dei
Opus Dei
was founded in Spain in 1928 by Catholic saint and priest Josemaría Escrivá
Josemaría Escrivá
and was given final Catholic Church
Catholic Church
approval in 1950 by Pope Pius XII.[7] St. John Paul II
St

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Pope John Paul II
Pope
Pope
Saint
Saint
John Paul II (Latin: Ioannes Paulus II; Italian: Giovanni Paolo II; Polish: Jan Paweł II; born Karol Józef Wojtyła;[a] [ˈkarɔl ˈjuzɛv vɔjˈtɨwa];[b] 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) served as Pope
Pope
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and sovereign of Vatican City from 1978 to 2005. He is called Saint
Saint
John Paul the Great by some Catholics.[6][7][8] He was elected by the second Papal conclave of 1978, which was called after Pope
Pope
John Paul I, who had been elected in August to succeed Pope Paul VI, died after thirty-three days
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Canonization
Canonization
Canonization
is the act by which a Christian church declares that a person who has died was a saint, upon which declaration the person is included in the "canon", or list, of recognized saints. Originally, a person was recognized as a saint without any formal process. Later, different processes were developed, such as those used today in the Anglican Communion, the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Oriental Orthodox Church.Contents1 Historical development 2 Anglican Communion 3 Catholic Church3.1 Nature 3.2 Procedure prior to reservation to the Apostolic See 3.3 Exclusive reservation to the Apostolic See 3.4 Procedure from 1734–38 to 1983 3.5 Since 1983 3.6 Equipollent canonization4 Eastern Orthodox Church 5 Oriental Orthodox Church 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistorical development[edit] The first persons honored as saints were the martyrs
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Pope Benedict XVI
Pope
Pope
Benedict XVI (Latin: Benedictus XVI; Italian: Benedetto XVI; German: Benedikt XVI; born Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger; German pronunciation: [ˈjoːzɛf ˈalɔʏzi̯ʊs ˈʁatsɪŋɐ]; 16 April 1927) served as Pope
Pope
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and sovereign of the Vatican City
Vatican City
from 2005 to 2013. Benedict's election occurred in the 2005 papal conclave that followed the death of Pope
Pope
John Paul II. Since his resignation, Benedict holds the unique title of "pope emeritus". Ordained as a priest in 1951 in his native Bavaria, Ratzinger had established himself as a highly regarded university theologian by the late 1950s and was appointed a full professor in 1958
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Patron Saint
A patron saint, patroness saint, patron hallow or heavenly protector is a saint who in Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, Eastern Orthodoxy, or particular branches of Islam, is regarded as the heavenly advocate of a nation, place, craft, activity, class, clan, family or person.[1][2][title missing][page needed] Catholics believe that patron saints, having already transcended to the metaphysical, are able to intercede effectively for the needs of their special charges.[3] Historically, a similar practice has also occurred in many Islamic lands
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Christendom
Christendom[1][2][page needed] has several meanings. In one contemporary sense, as used in a secular or Protestant context, it may refer to the " Christian
Christian
world": worldwide community of Christians,[citation needed] the adherents of Christianity,[citation needed] the Christian-majority countries,[citation needed] the countries in which Christianity
Christianity
dominates[3] or prevails,[1] or, in the Catholic
Catholic
sense of the word, the nations in which Catholic Christianity
Christianity
is the established religion. Since the spread of Christianity
Christianity
from the Levant
Levant
to Europe
Europe
and North Africa during the early Roman Empire, Christendom
Christendom
has been divided in the pre-existing Greek East and Latin West
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Common Worship
Worship
Worship
is an act of religious devotion usually directed towards a deity
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Spanish Naming Customs
Spanish naming customs
Spanish naming customs
are historical traditions for naming children practised in Spain. According to these customs, a person's name consists of a given name (simple or composite) followed by two family names (surnames). The first surname is usually the father's first surname, and the second the mother's first surname. In recent years, the order of the surnames can be decided at birth. Often, the practice is to use one given name and the first surname only (e.g. Miguel de Unamuno), with the full name being used in legal, formal, and documentary matters, or for disambiguation when the first surname is very common (e.g. Federico García Lorca). [1]. In these cases, it is common to use only the second surname, as in “Lorca” or “Zapatero”
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Calendar Of Saints (Lutheran)
The Lutheran Calendar of Saints is a listing which specifies the primary annual festivals and events that are celebrated liturgically by some Lutheran Churches in the United States. The calendars of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
(ELCA) and the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod (LCMS) are from the 1978 Lutheran Book of Worship and the 1982 Lutheran Worship. Elements unique to the ELCA have been updated from the Lutheran Book of Worship
Lutheran Book of Worship
to reflect changes resulting from the publication of Evangelical Lutheran Worship in 2006
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Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, England, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the United Kingdom's most notable religious buildings and the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. The building itself was a Benedictine
Benedictine
monastic church until the monastery was dissolved in 1539. Between 1540 and 1556, the abbey had the status of a cathedral
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