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Oriel College
Oriel College[2] is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in Oxford, England. Located in Oriel Square, the college has the distinction of being the oldest royal foundation in Oxford
Oxford
(a title formerly claimed by University College, whose claim of being founded by King Alfred is no longer promoted)
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William Fuller (bishop)
William Fuller (1608–1675) was an English churchman. He was dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin
St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin
(1660), bishop of Limerick (1663), and bishop of Lincoln (1667). He was also the friend of Samuel Pepys
Samuel Pepys
and John Evelyn.Contents1 Life 2 Settings 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] He was son of Thomas Fuller, a merchant of London, by his wife, Lucy, daughter of Simon Cannon, citizen and merchant taylor. He was born in London, and was educated at Westminster School, from which he went to Magdalen Hall, Oxford, as a commoner, about 1626, migrating to Edmund Hall, at which he took the degree of B.C.L, about 1632. After taking holy orders he was appointed one of the chaplains or petty canons of Christ Church Cathedral. He was presented by the king to the rectory of St
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Edward III Of England
Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England and Lord of Ireland
Lord of Ireland
from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of 50 years was the second longest in medieval England and saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death. Edward was crowned at age fourteen after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country, and began his personal reign
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Broad Street, Oxford
Broad Street is a wide street in central Oxford, England, just north of the former city wall.[1][2] The street is known for its bookshops, including the original Blackwell's
Blackwell's
bookshop at number 50, located here due to the University. Locally the street is traditionally known as The Broad.Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Shops 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksLocation[edit]The eastern part of Broad Street, with the Weston Library
Weston Library
on the left and Clarendon Building
Clarendon Building
on the right
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Advowson
Advowson (or "patronage") is the right in English law
English law
of a patron (avowee) to present to the diocesan bishop (or in some cases the ordinary if not the same person) a nominee for appointment to a vacant ecclesiastical benefice or church living, a process known as presentation (jus praesentandi, Latin: "the right of presenting")
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Aberford
Aberford
Aberford
is a large village and civil parish on the eastern outskirts of the City of Leeds
City of Leeds
metropolitan borough in West Yorkshire, England. It has a population of 1,059 according to the 2001 census, increasing to 1,180 at the 2011 Census.[1] It is situated 12 miles (19 km) east of Leeds city centre
Leeds city centre
and lies in the LS25 Leeds
Leeds
postcode area.Contents1 History 2 Geology 3 Buildings3.1 Parlington Estate4 Location grid 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Aberford
Aberford
was the crossing point of the ancient Great North Road over the Cock River
Cock River
(now reduced in volume as the Cock Beck)
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Lord Chancellor
The Lord Chancellor, formally the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, is the highest ranking among those Great Officers of State which are appointed regularly in the United Kingdom, outranking even the Prime Minister. The Lord Chancellor
Lord Chancellor
is outranked only by the Lord High Steward, another Great Officer of State, but appointed only for the day of coronations. The Lord Chancellor
Lord Chancellor
is appointed by the Sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister. Prior to the Union there were separate Lord Chancellors[1] for England
England
and Wales, for Scotland, and for Ireland. The Lord Chancellor
Lord Chancellor
is a member of the Cabinet and, by law, is responsible for the efficient functioning and independence of the courts. In 2007, there were a number of changes to the legal system and to the office of the Lord Chancellor
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Henry Burghersh
Henry Burghersh (1292 – 4 December 1340), English bishop and chancellor, was a younger son of Robert de Burghersh, 1st Baron Burghersh (died 1305), and a nephew of Bartholomew, Lord Badlesmere. He was educated in France. On 27 May 1320 owing to Badlesmere's influence Pope John XXII appointed Burghersh bishop of Lincoln[1] in spite of the fact that the chapter had already made an election to the vacant bishopric, and he was consecrated bishop on 20 July 1320.[1] After the execution of Badlesmere in 1322 Burghersh's lands were seized by Edward II, and the pope was urged to deprive him; about 1326, however, his possessions were restored, a proceeding which did not prevent him from joining Edward's queen, Isabella, and taking part in the movement which led to the deposition and murder of the king. Enjo
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Bishop Of Lincoln
The Bishop of Lincoln
Bishop of Lincoln
is the ordinary of the Church of England
Church of England
Diocese of Lincoln in the Province of Canterbury. The present diocese covers the county of Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
and the unitary authority areas of North Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
and North East Lincolnshire. The bishop's seat (cathedra) is located in the Cathedral
Cathedral
Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the city of Lincoln. The cathedral was originally a minster church founded around 653 and refounded as a cathedral in 1072
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Diocese Of Lincoln
The Diocese of Lincoln forms part of the Province of Canterbury
Province of Canterbury
in England. The present diocese covers the ceremonial county of Lincolnshire.Contents1 History 2 Organisation2.1 Bishops 2.2 Archdeaconries3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The diocese traces its roots in an unbroken line to the Pre-Reformation Diocese of Leicester, founded in 679. The see of Leicester was translated to Dorchester in the late 9th century, before taking in the territory of the Diocese of Lindsey
Diocese of Lindsey
and being translated to Lincoln. The diocese was then the largest in England, extending from the River Thames
River Thames
to the Humber Estuary. In 1072, Remigius de Fécamp, bishop under William the Conqueror, moved the see to Lincoln, although the Bishops of Lincoln retained significant landholdings within Oxfordshire
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Lollardy
Lollardy
Lollardy
(Lollardism, Lollard movement) was a pre- Protestant
Protestant
Christian religious movement that existed from the mid-14th century to the English Reformation. It was initially led by John Wycliffe,[1] a Roman Catholic theologian who was dismissed from the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
in 1381 for criticism of the Roman Catholic Church
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List Of Nobel Laureates
The Nobel Prizes
Nobel Prizes
(Swedish: Nobelpriset, Norwegian: Nobelprisen) are prizes awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy
Swedish Academy
of Sciences, the Swedish Academy, the Karolinska Institutet, and the Norwegian Nobel Committee to individuals and organizations who make outstanding contributions in the fields of chemistry, physics, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine.[1] They were established by the 1895 will of Alfred Nobel, which dictates that the awards should be administered by the Nobel Foundation. The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences was established in 1968 by the Sveriges Riksbank, the central bank of Sweden, for contributions to the field of economics
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Piety
In spiritual terminology, piety is a virtue that may include religious devotion, spirituality, or a mixture of both. A common element in most conceptions of piety is humility and religiosity.Contents1 Etymology 2 Use 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEtymology[edit] The word piety comes from the Latin
Latin
word pietas, the noun form of the adjective pius (which means "devout" or "dutiful"). Pietas in traditional Latin
Latin
usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man with pietas respected his responsibilities to gods, country, parents, and kin.[1] In its strictest sense it was the sort of love a son ought to have for his father. Use[edit] Piety
Piety
in modern English usage can refer to a way to win the favour or forgiveness of God
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John Wycliffe
John Wycliffe
John Wycliffe
(/ˈwɪklɪf/; also spelled Wyclif, Wycliff, Wiclef, Wicliffe, Wickliffe; 1320s – 31 December 1384)[2] was an English scholastic philosopher, theologian, Biblical translator, reformer, and seminary professor at the University of Oxford. He was an influential dissident within the Roman Catholic priesthood during the 14th century and is considered an important predecessor to Protestantism. Wycliffe attacked the privileged status of the clergy, which was central to their powerful role in England. He then attacked the luxury and pomp of local parishes and their ceremonies.[3] Wycliffe was also an advocate for translation of the Bible into the vernacular. He completed a translation directly from the Vulgate
Vulgate
into Middle English
Middle English
in the year 1382, now known as Wycliffe's Bible
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Henry VI Of England
Henry VI (6 December 1421 – 21 May 1471) was King of England
King of England
from 1422 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471, and disputed King of France from 1422 to 1453. The only child of Henry V, he succeeded to the English throne at the age of nine months upon his father's death, and succeeded to the French throne on the death of his maternal grandfather Charles VI shortly afterwards. Henry inherited the long-running Hundred Years' War
Hundred Years' War
(1337–1453), in which Charles VII contested his claim to the French throne. His early reign, during which several people were ruling for him, saw the height of English power in France, but subsequent military, diplomatic, and economic problems resulted in the decline of English fortunes in the war
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