HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Orfila
Mathieu Joseph Bonaventure Orfila (Catalan: Mateu Josep Bonaventura Orfila i Rotger) (24 April 1787 – 12 March 1853) was a Menorcan-born French toxicologist and chemist, the founder of the science of toxicology. Role in Forensic
Forensic
Toxicology[edit] If there is reason to believe that a murder or attempted murder may have been committed using poison, a forensic toxicologist is often brought in to examine pieces of evidence such as corpses and food items for poison content. In Orfila's time the primary type of poison in use was arsenic, but there were no reliable ways of testing for its presence. Orfila created new techniques and refined existing techniques in his first treatise, Traité des poisons, greatly enhancing their accuracy. In 1840, Marie Lafarge
Marie Lafarge
was tried for the murder of her husband using arsenic
[...More...]

"Orfila" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Forensic
Forensic science
Forensic science
is the application of science to criminal and civil laws, mainly—on the criminal side—during criminal investigation, as governed by the legal standards of admissible evidence and criminal procedure. Forensic scientists collect, preserve, and analyze scientific evidence during the course of an investigation. While some forensic scientists travel to the scene of the crime to collect the evidence themselves, others occupy a laboratory role, performing analysis on objects brought to them by other individuals.[1] In addition to their laboratory role, forensic scientists testify as expert witnesses in both criminal and civil cases and can work for either the prosecution or the defense. While any field could technically be forensic, certain sections have developed over time to encompass the majority of forensically related cases.[2] Forensic science is the combination of two different Latin words: forensis and science
[...More...]

"Forensic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Catalan Language
Catalan (/ˈkætəlæn, -ən, ˌkætəˈlæn/;[4] autonym: català [kətəˈla] or [kataˈla]) is a Western Romance
Western Romance
language derived from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
and named after the medieval Principality of Catalonia, in northeastern modern Spain. It is the only official language of Andorra,[5] and a co-official language of the Spanish autonomous communities of Catalonia, the Balearic Islands
Balearic Islands
and Valencia (where the language is known as Valencian). It also has semi-official status in the Italian commune of Alghero.[6] These territories are often called Catalan Countries. Catalan evolved from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
in the Middle Ages around the eastern Pyrenees
[...More...]

"Catalan Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
[...More...]

"Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively de
[...More...]

"Public Domain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
[...More...]

"International Standard Name Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
[...More...]

"Library Of Congress Control Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arsenic
Arsenic
Arsenic
is a chemical element with symbol As and atomic number 33. Arsenic
Arsenic
occurs in many minerals, usually in combination with sulfur and metals, but also as a pure elemental crystal. Arsenic
Arsenic
is a metalloid. It has various allotropes, but only the gray form is important to industry. The primary use of metallic arsenic is in alloys of lead (for example, in car batteries and ammunition). Arsenic
Arsenic
is a common n-type dopant in semiconductor electronic devices, and the optoelectronic compound gallium arsenide is the second most commonly used semiconductor after doped silicon. Arsenic
Arsenic
and its compounds, especially the trioxide, are used in the production of pesticides, treated wood products, herbicides, and insecticides
[...More...]

"Arsenic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Menorca
Menorca
Menorca
or Minorca (/mɪˈnɔːkə/; Catalan: Menorca
Menorca
[məˈnɔrkə]; Spanish: Menorca
Menorca
[meˈnorka]; from Latin: Insula Minor, later Minorica "smaller island") is one of the Balearic Islands
Balearic Islands
located in the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
belonging to Spain. Its name derives from its size, contrasting it with nearby Majorca. Menorca
Menorca
has a population of approximately 94,383 (2010). It is located 39°47' to 40°00'N, 3°52' to 4°24'E
[...More...]

"Menorca" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chemist
A chemist (from Greek chēm (ía) alchemy; replacing chymist from Medieval Latin alchimista[1]) is a scientist trained in the study of chemistry. Chemists study the composition of matter and its properties. Chemists carefully describe the properties they study in terms of quantities, with detail on the level of molecules and their component atoms. Chemists carefully measure substance proportions, reaction rates, and other chemical properties. The word 'chemist' is also used to address Pharmacists in Commonwealth English. Chemists use this knowledge to learn the composition, and properties of unfamiliar substances, as well as to reproduce and synthesize large quantities of useful naturally occurring substances and create new artificial substances and useful processes. Chemists may specialize in any number of subdisciplines of chemistry. Materials scientists and metallurgists share much of the same education and skills with chemists
[...More...]

"Chemist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Base Léonore
Base Léonore, or the Léonore database, is a French database that lists the records of the members of the National Order of the Legion of Honor. The database lists the records of those inducted into the Legion of Honor since its 1802 inception and died before 1977.[1] As of January 2014[update], the database contained 390,000 records.[2] References[edit]^ "Présentation de la base de données Léonore" (in French). Paris: Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication. 13 November 2014. Archived from the original on 16 March 2016.  ^ "Léonore" (in French). Paris: Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication. 1 January 2014. Archived from the original on 7 November 2014. External links[edit]Official website Wikidata
Wikidata
has the property: Léonore (P640) (see talk; uses)This database-related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Base Léonore" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
[...More...]

"SNAC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
[...More...]

"Bibliothèque Nationale De France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
is the scientific discipline involved with compounds composed of atoms, i.e. elements, and molecules, i.e. combinations of atoms: their composition, structure, properties, behavior and the changes they undergo during a reaction with other compounds.[1][2] Chemistry
Chemistry
addresses topics such as how atoms and molecules interact via chemical bonds to form new chemical compounds. There are four types of chemical bonds: covalent bonds, in which compounds share one or more electron(s); ionic bonds, in which a compound donates one or more electrons to another compound to produce ions: cations and anions; hydrogen bonds; and Van der Waals force
Van der Waals force
bonds
[...More...]

"Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.