HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Orderic Vitalis
Orderic Vitalis
Orderic Vitalis
(Latin: Ordericus Vitalis; 1075 – c. 1142) was an English chronicler and Benedictine monk who wrote one of the great contemporary chronicles of 11th- and 12th-century Normandy
Normandy
and Anglo-Norman England. Modern historians view him as a reliable source.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Monastic life 3 The Historia Ecclesiastica 4 Notes 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksBackground[edit] Orderic was born on 16 February 1075 in Atcham, Shropshire, England, the eldest son of a French priest, Odelerius of Orléans, who had entered the service of Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, and had received from his patron a chapel there. Orderic was one of the few monks who were of mixed parentage as his mother was of English heritage
[...More...]

"Orderic Vitalis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carolingian
Non-agnatic lines:Robertian dynastyHouse of Capet Bosonid dynastyCarolingian dynastyThe Carolingian cross.PippinidsPippin the Elder (c. 580–640) Grimoald (616–656) Childebert the Adopted
Childebert the Adopted
(d. 662)Arnulfings Arnulf of Metz
Arnulf of Metz
(582–640) Ansegisel (d. 662 or 679) Chlodulf of Metz (d. 696 or 697) Pepin of Herstal
Pepin of Herstal
(635-714) Grimoald II (d. 714) Drogo of Champagne
Drogo of Champagne
(670–708) Theudoald (d. 741)Carolingians Charles Martel
Charles Martel
(686–741) Carloman (d
[...More...]

"Carolingian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Worcester, England
Worcester
Worcester
(/ˈwʊstər/ ( listen) WUUS-tər) is a city in Worcestershire, England, 31 miles (50 km) southwest of Birmingham and 27 miles (43 km) north of Gloucester. The population is approximately 100,000. The River Severn
River Severn
flanks the western side of the city centre, which is overlooked by the 12th century Worcester Cathedral. The Battle of Worcester
Battle of Worcester
was the final battle of the English Civil War, where Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army
New Model Army
defeated King Charles I's Cavaliers
[...More...]

"Worcester, England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cambrai
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Cambrai
Cambrai
(French pronunciation: [kɑ̃bʁɛ] ( listen); Picard: Kimbré; Dutch: Kamerijk; historically in English Camerick and Camericke) is a commune in the Nord department and in the Hauts-de- France
France
region of France
France
on the Scheldt
Scheldt
river, which is known locally as the Escaut river. A sub-prefecture of the department, Cambrai
Cambrai
is a town which had 32,518 inhabitants in the Census of 2009. It is in the heart of the urban unit of Cambrai (fr) which, with 47,138 inhabitants, ranks as 7th largest of the department
[...More...]

"Cambrai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scriptorium
Scriptorium
Scriptorium
(/skrɪpˈtɔːriəm/ ( listen)),[1] literally "a place for writing", is commonly used to refer to a room in medieval European monasteries devoted to the writing, copying and illuminating of manuscripts by monastic scribes.Contents1 The functional outset 2 The physical scriptorium2.1 San Giovanni Evangelista, Rimini 2.2 Cassiodorus
Cassiodorus
and the Vivarium 2.3 Cistercians3 Institutions3.1 Benedictines3.1.1 St
[...More...]

"Scriptorium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

William Of Jumièges
William
William
is a popular given name of an old Germanic origin.[1] It became very popular in the English language
English language
after the Norman conquest of England in 1066,[2] and remained so throughout the Middle Ages and into the modern era. It is sometimes abbreviated "Wm." Shortened familiar versions in English include Will, Willy, Bill, and Billy. A common Irish form is Liam. Female forms are Willa, Willemina, Willamette, Wilma and Wilhelmina. Etymology[edit]This article is missing information about the etymology of "Bill". Please expand the article to include this information. Further details may exist on the talk page. (October 2015) William
William
comes ultimately from the given name Wilhelm (cf. Old German Wilhelm > German Wilhelm and Old Norse
Old Norse
Vilhjálmr)
[...More...]

"William Of Jumièges" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Birth Of Christ
The nativity of Jesus or birth of Jesus is described in the gospels of Luke and Matthew. The two accounts agree that Jesus was born in Bethlehem in the time of Herod the Great to a betrothed virgin whose name was Mary.[1] They also differ slightly in content, because they are two separate accounts, given by two individuals, thus each includes some details that the other chose to omit; however, this fact does not strongly evidence contradiction (as some believe) and the differences are not major. Matthew does not mention the census, annunciation to the shepherds or presentation in the Temple, does not give the name of the angel that appeared to Joseph to foretell the birth
[...More...]

"Birth Of Christ" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pope
The pope (Latin: papa from Greek: πάππας pappas,[1] a child's word for "father"),[2] also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest bridge-builder"), is the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome, and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.[3] The primacy of the Roman bishop is largely derived from his role as the supposed apostolic successor to Saint Peter, to whom Jesus is said to have given the Keys of Heaven
Keys of Heaven
and the powers of "binding and loosing", naming him as the "rock" upon which the church would be built. The pope is also head of state of Vatican City,[4] a sovereign city-state entirely enclaved within Rome. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.[5] The office of the pope is the papacy
[...More...]

"Pope" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Innocent I
Pope Innocent I (Latin: Innocentius I; d. 12 March 417) served as the Pope of the Catholic Church from 401 to his death in 417. From the beginning of his papacy, he was seen as the general arbitrator of ecclesiastical disputes in both the East and the West. He confirmed the prerogatives of the Archbishop of Thessalonica, and issued a decretal on disciplinary matters referred to him by the Bishop of Rouen. He defended the exiled John Chrysostom and consulted with the bishops of Africa concerning the Pelagian controversy, confirming the decisions of the African synods
[...More...]

"Innocent I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Capet
The House of Capet or the Direct Capetians (French: Capétiens directs, Maison capétienne), also called the House of France (la maison de France), or simply the Capets, ruled the Kingdom of France from 987 to 1328. It was the most senior line of the Capetian dynasty – itself a derivative dynasty from the Robertians. Historians in the 19th century came to apply the name "Capetian" to both the ruling house of France and to the wider-spread male-line descendants of Hugh Capet. It was not a contemporary practice (see House of France). They were sometimes called "the third race of kings", the Merovingians being the first, and the Carolingians being the second. The name Capet is derived from the nickname of Hugh, the first Capetian King, who was known as Hugh Capet. The direct line of the House of Capet came to an end in 1328, when the three sons of Philip IV all failed to produce surviving male heirs to the French throne
[...More...]

"Capet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Priesthood (Catholic Church)
The ministerial orders of the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
(for similar but different rules among Eastern Catholics see Eastern Catholic Church) are those of bishop, presbyter (more commonly called priest in English), and deacon. The ordained priesthood and the common priesthood (or priesthood of all the baptized faithful) are different in function and essence.[1][2] The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
teaches that when a man participates in priesthood, he participates in the priesthood of Christ
Christ
Himself
[...More...]

"Priesthood (Catholic Church)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holy Roman Empire
The Holy Roman Empire
Roman Empire
(Latin: Sacrum Romanum Imperium; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and continued until its dissolution in 1806.[6] The largest territory of the empire after 962 was the Kingdom of Germany, though it also came to include the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Kingdom of Burgundy, the Kingdom of Italy, and numerous other territories.[7][8][9] On 25 December 800, Pope Leo III crowned the Frankish king Charlemagne as Emperor, reviving the title in Western Europe, more than three centuries after the fall of the Western Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Holy Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Papacy
The pope (Latin: papa from Greek: πάππας pappas,[1] a child's word for "father"),[2] also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest bridge-builder"), is the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome, and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.[3] The primacy of the Roman bishop is largely derived from his role as the supposed apostolic successor to Saint Peter, to whom Jesus is said to have given the Keys of Heaven
Keys of Heaven
and the powers of "binding and loosing", naming him as the "rock" upon which the church would be built. The pope is also head of state of Vatican City,[4] a sovereign city-state entirely enclaved within Rome. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.[5] The office of the pope is the papacy
[...More...]

"Papacy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First Crusade
CrusadersKingdom of FranceBlois Toulouse Boulogne Flanders Normandy Le Puy-en-Velay Vermandois BrittanyHoly Roman EmpireDuchy of Lower Lorraine Republic of GenoaSicily (Taranto) Byzantine Empire Armenian CiliciaMuslim forcesSeljuk Sultanate Danishmends Fatimid Caliphate Abbasid CaliphateCommanders and leadersImperial Contingent:Godfrey of Bouillon Baldwin of BoulogneSouthern French Contingent:Raymond IV of Toulouse Adhemar of Le PuyNorthern French Contingent:Hugh I of Vermandois Stephen II of Blois Robert II of Flanders Robert II of NormandyNorman-Italian ContingentBohemond of Taranto Tancred of Hauteville Richard of SalernoEastern Leaders:Alexios I Komnenos Tatikios Manuel Boutoumites Constantine of ArmeniaSeljuq Empire:Kilij Arslan I Yaghi-Siyan Kerbogha Duqaq Fakhr al-Mulk RadwanDanishmendsGhazi ibn DanishmendFatimidsIftikhar ad-Daula Al-Afdal ShahanshahStrengthCrusaders: ca
[...More...]

"First Crusade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fulcher Of Chartres
Fulcher of Chartres
Chartres
(1059 in or near Chartres
Chartres
- after 1128) was a priest and participated in the First Crusade. He served Baldwin I of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
for many years, and wrote a chronicle of the Crusade, writing in Latin.Contents1 Life 2 Chronicle 3 References3.1 Sources4 Further readingLife[edit] Fulcher was born in 1059.[1] His appointment as chaplain of Baldwin of Boulogne in 1097 suggests that he had been trained as a priest, most likely at the school of Chartres
[...More...]

"Fulcher Of Chartres" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.