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Order Of The Elephant
The Order of the Elephant
Order of the Elephant
(Danish: Elefantordenen) is a Danish order of chivalry and is Denmark's highest-ranked honour. It has origins in the 15th century, but has officially existed since 1693, and since the establishment of constitutional monarchy in 1849, is now almost exclusively used to honour royalty and heads of state.[1]Contents1 History 2 Composition 3 Insignia and habits 4 Current knights and officers4.1 Sovereign of the Royal Danish Orders of Chivalry 4.2 Current Knights of the Elephant listed by date of appointment 4.3 Officers of the Chapter of the Royal Danish Orders of Chivalry5 Other notable knights 6 Fictional Members 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] A Danish religious confraternity called the Fellowship of the Mother of God, limited to about fifty members of the Danish aristocracy, was founded during the reign of Christian I
Christian I
during the 15th century
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Rhinegraves
Rhinegraves are a form of breeches which were popular from the early 1660s until the mid-1670s in Western Europe. They were very full petticoat breeches gathered at the knee. They were worn under petticoat breeches or under an overskirt which was decorated with ribbon loops around the waist and around the knee. Where the knee was gathered, a large frill of lace and stocking tops added further decoration.Man in Black, by Gerard ter Borch, c. 1673[1]Boy servant wearing close-fitting breeches and petticoat breeches over them, 1657During the 1670s as the longer coat and long waistcoat became popular, these very full breeches became less full and by the late 1670s and early 1680s they were replaced by more tight fitting breeches with the stockings worn over them. References[edit]^ Petticoat breeches, or rhinegraves, 20,000 Years of Fashion, plate 580This fashion-related article is a stub
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Frederick II Of Denmark And Norway
Frederick II (1 July 1534 – 4 April 1588) was King of Denmark and Norway
Norway
and Duke of Schleswig from 1559 until his death.[1]Contents1 King of Denmark 2 Family and children 3 Ancestry 4 References 5 External linksKing of Denmark[edit]King Frederik IIFrederick II was the son of King Christian III of Denmark
Christian III of Denmark
and Norway and Dorothea of Saxe-Lauenburg, the daughter of Magnus I, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg. He was hailed as successor to the throne of Denmark
Denmark
in 1542, and of Norway
Norway
in 1548. Unlike his father, King Frederick II was strongly affected by military ideals. Already as a young man, he made friendships with German war princes. In 1552, Steward of the Realm, Peder Oxe
Peder Oxe
(1520–1575), had been raised to Councillor of State (Rigsraad)
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Presidential Library
In the United States, the presidential library system is a nationwide network of 15 libraries administered by the Office of Presidential Libraries, which is part of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). These are repositories for preserving and making available the papers, records, collections and other historical materials of every President of the United States
United States
from Herbert Hoover (31st President, 1929-1933) to George W. Bush
George W. Bush
(43rd President, 2001-2009). In addition to the library services, museum exhibitions concerning the presidency are displayed. Although recognized as having historical significance, before the mid-20th century, presidential papers and effects were generally understood to be the private property of the president. Franklin D. Roosevelt, the 32nd president, proposed to leave his papers to the public in a building donated by him on his Hyde Park estate
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Ostrich
The ostrich or common ostrich ( Struthio
Struthio
camelus) is either one or two species of large flightless birds native to Africa, the only living member(s) of the genus Struthio, which is in the ratite family. In 2014, the Somali ostrich
Somali ostrich
( Struthio
Struthio
molybdophanes) was recognized as a distinct species.[2][3] The common ostrich shares the order Struthioniformes
Struthioniformes
with the kiwis, emus, rheas, and cassowaries
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Plume (feather)
A plume is a special type of bird feather, possessed by egrets, ostriches, birds of paradise, quetzals, pheasants and peacocks. They often have a decorative or ornamental purpose, commonly used among marching bands and the military, worn on the hat or helmet of the wearer. When used on military headdresses, the clipped feather plume is referred to as the hackle. Brightly colored plumes are used by American coot
American coot
chicks to entice their parents to feed them more food. It is a form of chick ornament.This bird-related article is a stub
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Mantle (clothing)
A mantle (from mantellum, the Latin
Latin
term for a cloak) is a type of loose garment usually worn over indoor clothing to serve the same purpose as an overcoat. Technically, the term describes a long, loose cape-like cloak worn from the 12th to the 16th century by both sexes, although by the 19th century, it was used to describe any loose-fitting, shaped outer garment similar to a cape.[1] For example, the dolman, a 19th-century cape-like woman's garment with partial sleeves is often described as a mantle.[2] Mantelets[edit]Mantelet, French, 1895A variation on the mantle is the mantelet (also spelled mantelot and mantlet), typically describing a short version of the mantle
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Badge
A badge is a device or accessory, often containing the insignia of an organization, which is presented or displayed to indicate some feat of service, a special accomplishment, a symbol of authority granted by taking an oath (e.g., police and fire), a sign of legitimate employment or student status, or as a simple means of identification. They are also used in advertising, publicity, and for branding purposes. Police
Police
badges date back to medieval times when knights wore a coat of arms representing their allegiances and loyalty. Badges can be made from metal, plastic, leather, textile, rubber, etc., and they are commonly attached to clothing, bags, footwear, vehicles, home electrical equipment, etc. Textile
Textile
badges or patches can be either woven or embroidered, and can be attached by gluing, ironing-on, sewing or applique
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Doublet (clothing)
A doublet is a man's snug-fitting jacket that is shaped and fitted to the man's body which was worn in Spain
Spain
and was spread to Western Europe from the late Middle Ages
Middle Ages
up to the mid-17th century. The doublet was hip length or waist length and worn over the shirt or drawers. Until the end of the 15th century, the doublet was usually worn under another layer of clothing such as a gown, mantle, overtunic or jerkin when in public. Originally it was a mere stitched and quilted lining ("doubling"), worn under a hauberk or cuirass to prevent bruising and chafing. Doublets were sometimes opened to the waistline in a deep V. The edges might be left free or laced across the shirt front. If there was space left it might be filled with a stomacher. By the 1520s, the edges of the doublet more frequently met at the center front
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Moiré
In mathematics, physics, and art, a moiré pattern (/mwɑːrˈeɪ/; French: [mwaʁe]) or moiré fringes[1] are large-scale interference patterns that can be produced when an opaque ruled pattern with transparent gaps is overlaid on another similar pattern. For the moiré interference pattern to appear, the two patterns must not be completely identical in that they must be displaced, rotated, etc., or have different but similar pitch. Moiré patterns appear in many different situations. In printing, the printed pattern of dots can negatively interfere with the image. In television and digital photography, a pattern on an object being photographed can interfere with the shape of the light sensors to generate unwanted artifacts
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Mahout
A mahout is an elephant rider, trainer, or keeper.[1] Usually, a mahout starts as a boy in the family profession when he is assigned an elephant early in its life. They remain bonded to each other throughout their lives.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Equipment 3 Society 4 Culture 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word mahout derives from the Hindi
Hindi
words mahaut (महौत) and mahavat (महावत), and originally from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
mahamatra (महामात्र). Another term is cornac or kornak, which entered many European languages via Portuguese. This word derives ultimately from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
term karināyaka, a compound of karin (elephant) and nayaka (leader). In Tamil, the word used is pahan, which means "elephant keeper", and in Sinhalese kurawanayaka ("stable master")
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Moors
The term "Moors" refers primarily to the Muslim
Muslim
inhabitants of the Maghreb, the Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, and Malta
Malta
during the Middle Ages
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Frederick IV Of Denmark
Frederick IV (11 October 1671 – 12 October 1730) was the king of Denmark
Denmark
and Norway
Norway
from 1699 until his death. Frederick was the son of King Christian V of Denmark- Norway
Norway
and his consort Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Kassel.Contents1 Early life 2 Reign2.1 Domestic rule 2.2 Italian journey 2.3 Foreign affairs 2.4 Personal life 2.5 Later life 2.6 Children3 Ancestry 4 Titles and styles 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit]Crown-prince Frederick (IV), with his father in centre and his brothers Christian and Charles.Frederick as Crown-Prince by Hyacinthe Rigaud.As crown prince, Frederick broadened his education by travelling in Europe, led by his chamberlain Ditlev Wibe
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Queen Elizabeth II Of The United Kingdom
Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
(Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926)[a] is Queen of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the other Commonwealth realms. Elizabeth was born in London as the first child of the Duke and Duchess of York, later King George VI
George VI
and Queen Elizabeth, and she was educated privately at home. Her father acceded to the throne on the abdication of his brother King Edward VIII
King Edward VIII
in 1936, from which time she was the heir presumptive. She began to undertake public duties during the Second World War, serving in the Auxiliary Territorial Service
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King Christian V
Christian V (15 April 1646 – 25 August 1699) was king of Denmark and Norway from 1670 until his death in 1699. Well-regarded by the common people, he was the first king anointed at Frederiksborg Castle chapel as absolute monarch since the decree that institutionalized the supremacy of the Danish king, he fortified the absolutist system against the aristocracy by accelerating his father’s practice of allowing Holstein nobles and Danish commoners into state service. As king he wanted to show his power as absolute monarch through architecture, and dreamed of a Danish Versailles. He was the first to use the 1671 Throne Chair of Denmark, partly made for this purpose.[1] His motto was: Pietate et Justitia (With piety and justice).Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Reign 1.3 Family2 Titles, styles and arms 3 Ancestry 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Christian I
Christian I (February 1426 – 21 May 1481) was a Scandinavian monarch under the Kalmar Union. He was King of Denmark (1448–1481), Norway (1450–1481) and Sweden (1457–1464). From 1460 to 1481, he was also Duke of Schleswig (within Denmark) and Count (after 1474, Duke) of Holstein (within the Holy Roman Empire). He was the first Danish monarch of the House of Oldenburg. He was a son of Count Dietrich of Oldenburg, a descendant of King Eric IV of Denmark, and Hedwig of Holstein, a descendant of King Eric V of Denmark and Abel of Denmark. In the power vacuum that arose following the childless death of King Christopher of Denmark, Sweden and Norway in 1448, Sweden elected Charles VIII king with the intent to reestablish the union under a Swedish king. Charles was elected king of Norway in the following year, but the counts of Holstein were more influential than the Swedes and the Norwegians together, and made the Danish Privy Council appoint Christian as king
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