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OpenMAX
OpenMAX
OpenMAX
(Open Media Acceleration), often shortened as "OMX", is a non-proprietary and royalty-free cross-platform set of C-language programming interfaces. It provides abstractions for routines that are especially useful for processing of audio, video, and still images.[1][2] It is intended for low power and embedded system devices (including smartphones, game consoles, digital media players, and set-top boxes) that need to efficiently process large amounts of multimedia data in predictable ways, such as video codecs, graphics libraries, and other functions for video, image, audio, voice and speech.[3] OpenMAX
OpenMAX
provides three layers of interfaces: application layer (AL), integration layer (IL) and development layer (DL)
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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Image Compression
Image compression
Image compression
is a type of data compression applied to digital images, to reduce their cost for storage or transmission. Algorithms may take advantage of visual perception and the statistical properties of image data to provide superior results compared with generic compression methods.[1]Comparison of JPEG
JPEG
images saved by Adobe Photoshop at different quality levels and with or without "save for web"Contents1 Lossy and lossless image compression 2 Other properties 3 Notes and references 4 External linksLossy and lossless image compression[edit] Image compression
Image compression
may be lossy or lossless. Lossless compression is preferred for archival purposes and often for medical imaging, technical drawings, clip art, or comics. Lossy compression methods, especially when used at low bit rates, introduce compression artifacts
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Software License
A software license is a legal instrument (usually by way of contract law, with or without printed material) governing the use or redistribution of software. Under United States copyright law all software is copyright protected, in source code as also object code form.[2] The only exception is software in the public domain. A typical software license grants the licensee, typically an end-user, permission to use one or more copies of software in ways where such a use would otherwise potentially constitute copyright infringement of the software owner's exclusive rights under copyright law.Contents1 Software
Software
licenses and copyright law1.1 Ownership vs
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Object (computer Science)
In computer science, an object can be a variable, a data structure, a function, or a method, and as such, is a location in memory having a value and referenced by an identifier. In the class-based object-oriented programming paradigm, "object" refers to a particular instance of a class where the object can be a combination of variables, functions, and data structures. In relational database management, an object can be a table or column, or an association between data and a database entity (such as relating a person's age to a specific person).[1]Contents1 Object-based languages 2 Object-oriented programming 3 Specialized objects 4 Distributed objects 5 The Semantic Web 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksObject-based languages[edit] Main article: Object-based languages An important distinction in programming languages is the difference between an object-oriented language and an object-based language
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Interface (computer Science)
In computing, an interface is a shared boundary across which two or more separate components of a computer system exchange information. The exchange can be between software, computer hardware, peripheral devices, humans and combinations of these. Some computer hardware devices, such as a touchscreen, can both send and receive data through the interface, while others such as a mouse or microphone may only provide an interface to send data to a given system.[1]Contents1 Hardware interfaces 2 Software
Software
Interfaces2.1 Software
Software
interfaces in practice 2.2 Software
Software
interfaces in object-oriented languages 2.3 Programming to the interface3 User interfaces 4 See also 5 ReferencesHardware interfaces[edit] Main article: hardware interface Hardware interfaces exist in many of the components, such as the various buses, storage devices, other I/O
I/O
devices, etc
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Embedded System
An embedded system is a computer system with a dedicated function within a larger mechanical or electrical system, often with real-time computing constraints.[1][2] It is embedded as part of a complete device often including hardware and mechanical parts. Embedded systems control many devices in common use today.[3] Ninety-eight percent of all microprocessors are manufactured as components of embedded systems.[4] Examples of properties of typical embedded computers when compared with general-purpose counterparts are low power consumption, small size, rugged operating ranges, and low per-unit cost. This comes at the price of limited processing resources, which make them significantly more difficult to program and to interact with
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MIDI
MIDI
MIDI
(/ˈmɪdi/; short for Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is a technical standard that describes a communications protocol, digital interface, and electrical connectors that interconnects a wide variety of electronic musical instruments, computers, and related music and audio devices.[1] A single MIDI
MIDI
link can carry up to sixteen channels of information, each of which can be routed to a separate device. MIDI
MIDI
carries event messages that specify notation, pitch and velocity (loudness or softness), control signals for parameters such as volume, vibrato, audio panning from left to right, cues in theatre, and clock signals that set and synchronize tempo between multiple devices. These messages transmit via a MIDI
MIDI
cable to other devices, where they control sound generation and other features
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Android (operating System)
Android is a mobile operating system developed by Google, based on a modified version of the Linux kernel
Linux kernel
and other open source software and designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. In addition, Google
Google
has further developed Android TV
Android TV
for televisions, Android Auto
Android Auto
for cars, and Wear OS
Wear OS
for wrist watches, each with a specialized user interface. Variants of Android are also used on game consoles, digital cameras, PCs and other electronics. Initially developed by Android Inc., which Google
Google
bought in 2005, Android was unveiled in 2007, with the first commercial Android device launched in September 2008. The operating system has since gone through multiple major releases, with the current version being 8.1 "Oreo", released in December 2017
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Signal Processing
Signal
Signal
processing concerns the analysis, synthesis, and modification of signals, which are broadly defined as functions conveying "information about the behavior or attributes of some phenomenon",[1] such as sound, images, and biological measurements.[2] For example, signal processing techniques are used to improve signal transmission fidelity, storage efficiency, and subjective quality, and to emphasize or detect components of interest in a measured signal.[3]Contents1 History 2 Application fields 3 Typical devices 4 Mathematical methods applied 5 Categories5.1 Analog signal processing 5.2 Continuous-time signal processing 5.3 Discrete-time signal
Discrete-time signal
processing 5.4 Digital signal processing 5.5 Nonlinear signal processing6 See also 7 Notes and references 8 External linksHistory[edit] According to Alan V. Oppenheim and Ronald W
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Image Processing
Digital image
Digital image
processing is the use of computer algorithms to perform image processing on digital images. As a subcategory or field of digital signal processing, digital image processing has many advantages over analog image processing
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Audio Codec
An audio codec is a codec (a device or computer program capable of encoding or decoding a digital data stream) that encodes or decodes audio.[1][2][3][4] In software, an audio codec is a computer program implementing an algorithm that compresses and decompresses digital audio data according to a given audio file or streaming media audio coding format. The objective of the algorithm is to represent the high-fidelity audio signal with minimum number of bits while retaining quality. This can effectively reduce the storage space and the bandwidth required for transmission of the stored audio file. Most codecs are implemented as libraries which interface to one or more multimedia players. In hardware, audio codec refers to a single device that encodes analog audio as digital signals and decodes digital back into analog
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Video Codec
A video codec is an electronic circuit or software that compresses or decompresses digital video. It converts uncompressed video to a compressed format or vice versa. In the context of video compression, "codec" is a concatenation of "encoder" and "decoder"—a device that only compresses is typically called an encoder, and one that only decompresses is a decoder. The compressed data format usually conforms to a standard video compression specification. The compression is typically lossy, meaning that the compressed video lacks some information present in the original video
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Software Release Life Cycle
A software release life cycle is the sum of the stages of development and maturity for a piece of computer software: ranging from its initial development to its eventual release, and including updated versions of the released version to help improve software or fix software bugs still present in the software.Contents1 History 2 Stages of development2.1 Pre-alpha 2.2 Alpha 2.3 Beta2.3.1 Open and closed beta2.4 Release candidate3 Release3.1 Release to manufacturing (RTM) 3.2 General availability (GA) 3.3 Release to web (RTW)4 Support4.1 End-of-life5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyHistory[edit] Usage of the "alpha/beta" test terminology originated at IBM. As long ago as the 1950s (and probably earlier), IBM used similar terminology for their hardware development. "A" test was the verification of a new product before public announcement. "B" test was the verification before releasing the product to be manufactured
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PlayStation 3
The PlayStation
PlayStation
3 (PS3) is a home video game console developed by Sony Computer Entertainment. It is the successor to PlayStation
PlayStation
2, and is part of the PlayStation
PlayStation
brand of consoles. It was first released on November 11, 2006, in Japan,[8] November 17, 2006, in North America, and March 23, 2007, in Europe
Europe
and Australia.[9][10][11] The PlayStation
PlayStation
3 mainly competed against consoles such as Microsoft's Xbox 360
Xbox 360
and Nintendo's Wii
Wii
as part of the seventh generation of video game consoles. The console was first officially announced at E3 2005, and was released at the end of 2006
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AMD
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) is an American multinational semiconductor company based in Santa Clara, California, that develops computer processors and related technologies for business and consumer markets. While initially it manufactured its own processors, the company later outsourced its manufacturing, a practice known as fabless, after GlobalFoundries
GlobalFoundries
was spun off in 2009. AMD's main products include microprocessors, motherboard chipsets, embedded processors and graphics processors for servers, workstations and personal computers, and embedded systems applications. AMD
AMD
is the second-largest supplier and only significant rival to Intel in the market for x86-based microprocessors
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