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Onogawa Kisaburō
Onogawa Kisaburō
Onogawa Kisaburō
(小野川喜三郎, 1758 – April 30, 1806) was a sumo wrestler from Ōtsu, Shiga
Ōtsu, Shiga
Prefecture, Japan. He was the sport's 5th yokozuna. Along with Tanikaze he was the first to be given a yokozuna licence by the House of Yoshida Tsukasa and the first to perform the dohyō-iri to promote sumo tournaments.Contents1 Career 2 Top division record 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksCareer[edit] Onogawa was promoted to the top makuuchi division in March 1781. He defeated ōzeki Tanikaze Kajinosuke
Tanikaze Kajinosuke
in February 1782. The victory surprised people in Edo as it brought to an end Tanikaze's run of 63 consecutive victories
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Japanese Name
Japanese names (日本人の氏名, Nihonjin no Shimei) in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name. More than one given name is not generally used. Japanese names are usually written in kanji, which are characters usually Chinese in origin but Japanese in pronunciation
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Raiden Tameimon
Raiden Tameemon (雷電爲右衞門), born Seki Tarōkichi (January 1767 – February 11, 1825), is considered one of the greatest sumo wrestlers in history, although he was never promoted to yokozuna.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Professional sumo career 3 Retirement from sumo 4 Unsolved riddle 5 Top division record 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Raiden was born to a farming family in a village in rural Shinano Province. He is said to have possessed great physical strength even in childhood. His father Hanemon, who enjoyed sumo as much as sake, allowed 14-year-old Raiden to attend sumo classes at Nagaze (today called Murokocho), the neighbouring village. When Raiden was 17, the Urakaze-beya stablemaster noticed him when he came through the area while on jungyō (regional tour) with his wrestlers. He was especially impressed with the young man's physique, which was extraordinary at the time
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Banzuke
This article is about the banzuke document, for a list of wrestlers as ranked on an actual banzuke see List of active sumo wrestlersThe banzuke from the January 2012 tournamentA banzuke (番付), officially called banzuke-hyō (番付表) is a document listing the rankings of professional sumo wrestlers published before each official tournament or honbasho. The term can also refer to the rankings themselves. The document is normally released about two weeks before the tournament begins. On the banzuke wrestlers are divided into East, which is printed on the right, and West, which is printed on the left. Each wrestler's full shikona (ring name), hometown and rank is also listed. The top of the page starts with the highest ranked makuuchi wrestlers printed in the largest characters, down to the wrestlers in the lowest divisions which are written in much smaller characters
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Jonokuchi
Professional sumo is divided into six ranked divisions. Wrestlers are promoted and demoted within and between these divisions based on the merit of their win/loss records in official tournaments. For more information see kachi-koshi and make-koshi. Wrestlers are also ranked within each division. The higher a wrestler's rank within a division is, the stronger the general level of opponents he will have to face becomes. According to tradition, each rank is further subdivided into East and West, with East being slightly more prestigious, and ranked slightly higher than its West counterpart. The divisions, ranked in order of hierarchy from highest to lowest, are as follows:Contents1 Makuuchi 2 Jūryō 3 Makushita 4 Sandanme 5 Jonidan 6 Jonokuchi 7 See also 8 SourcesMakuuchi[edit] Main article: Makuuchi Makuuchi
Makuuchi
dohyō-iri Makuuchi
Makuuchi
(幕内), or makunouchi (幕の内), is the top division
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Jonidan
Professional sumo is divided into six ranked divisions. Wrestlers are promoted and demoted within and between these divisions based on the merit of their win/loss records in official tournaments. For more information see kachi-koshi and make-koshi. Wrestlers are also ranked within each division. The higher a wrestler's rank within a division is, the stronger the general level of opponents he will have to face becomes. According to tradition, each rank is further subdivided into East and West, with East being slightly more prestigious, and ranked slightly higher than its West counterpart. The divisions, ranked in order of hierarchy from highest to lowest, are as follows:Contents1 Makuuchi 2 Jūryō 3 Makushita 4 Sandanme 5 Jonidan 6 Jonokuchi 7 See also 8 SourcesMakuuchi[edit] Main article: Makuuchi Makuuchi
Makuuchi
dohyō-iri Makuuchi
Makuuchi
(幕内), or makunouchi (幕の内), is the top division
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Sandanme
Professional sumo is divided into six ranked divisions. Wrestlers are promoted and demoted within and between these divisions based on the merit of their win/loss records in official tournaments. For more information see kachi-koshi and make-koshi. Wrestlers are also ranked within each division. The higher a wrestler's rank within a division is, the stronger the general level of opponents he will have to face becomes. According to tradition, each rank is further subdivided into East and West, with East being slightly more prestigious, and ranked slightly higher than its West counterpart. The divisions, ranked in order of hierarchy from highest to lowest, are as follows:Contents1 Makuuchi 2 Jūryō 3 Makushita 4 Sandanme 5 Jonidan 6 Jonokuchi 7 See also 8 SourcesMakuuchi[edit] Main article: Makuuchi Makuuchi
Makuuchi
dohyō-iri Makuuchi
Makuuchi
(幕内), or makunouchi (幕の内), is the top division
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Makushita
Professional sumo is divided into six ranked divisions. Wrestlers are promoted and demoted within and between these divisions based on the merit of their win/loss records in official tournaments. For more information see kachi-koshi and make-koshi. Wrestlers are also ranked within each division. The higher a wrestler's rank within a division is, the stronger the general level of opponents he will have to face becomes. According to tradition, each rank is further subdivided into East and West, with East being slightly more prestigious, and ranked slightly higher than its West counterpart. The divisions, ranked in order of hierarchy from highest to lowest, are as follows:Contents1 Makuuchi 2 Jūryō 3 Makushita 4 Sandanme 5 Jonidan 6 Jonokuchi 7 See also 8 SourcesMakuuchi[edit] Main article: Makuuchi Makuuchi
Makuuchi
dohyō-iri Makuuchi
Makuuchi
(幕内), or makunouchi (幕の内), is the top division
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Jūryō
Professional sumo is divided into six ranked divisions. Wrestlers are promoted and demoted within and between these divisions based on the merit of their win/loss records in official tournaments. For more information see kachi-koshi and make-koshi. Wrestlers are also ranked within each division. The higher a wrestler's rank within a division is, the stronger the general level of opponents he will have to face becomes. According to tradition, each rank is further subdivided into East and West, with East being slightly more prestigious, and ranked slightly higher than its West counterpart. The divisions, ranked in order of hierarchy from highest to lowest, are as follows:Contents1 Makuuchi 2 Jūryō 3 Makushita 4 Sandanme 5 Jonidan 6 Jonokuchi 7 See also 8 SourcesMakuuchi[edit] Main article: Makuuchi Makuuchi
Makuuchi
dohyō-iri Makuuchi
Makuuchi
(幕内), or makunouchi (幕の内), is the top division
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Heya (sumo)
In sumo wrestling, a heya (部屋, lit. "room"; usually translated into English as stable or training quarters[1]) is an organization of sumo wrestlers where they train and live. It can also be termed sumo-beya. All wrestlers in professional sumo must belong to one. There are currently 44 heya (as of 2016),[2] all of which belong to one of six ichimon (groupings of heya). They vary in size, with the largest heya having over thirty wrestlers and smallest just two. Most heya are based in and around the Ryōgoku
Ryōgoku
district of Tokyo, sumo's traditional heartland, although the high price of land has led to some newer heya being built in other parts of Tokyo
Tokyo
or its suburbs. Most heya have a network of scouts, who may be former wrestlers themselves, friends of the head coach, or supporters of the heya, who keep a look out for any powerful or athletic young men and follow the results of local sumo (and judo) competitions
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Jujutsu
Jujutsu
Jujutsu
(/dʒuːˈdʒuːtsuː/ joo-JOOT-soo; Japanese: 柔術, jūjutsu  listen (help·info)), also known in the West as Ju-Jitsu or Jiu-Jitsu, is a Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses either a short weapon or none.[1][2]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Etymology 3 History3.1 Origins 3.2 Development4 Description 5 Schools and derivations5.1
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Osaka
Osaka
Osaka
(大阪市, Ōsaka-shi) (Japanese pronunciation: [oːsaka];  listen (help·info)) is a designated city in the Kansai region of Japan. It is the capital city of Osaka Prefecture
Osaka Prefecture
and the largest component of the Keihanshin
Keihanshin
Metropolitan Area, the second largest metropolitan area in Japan
Japan
and among the largest in the world with over 19 million inhabitants
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Gohei
Gohei
Gohei
(御幣), onbe (御幣), or heisoku (幣束) are wooden wands, decorated with two shide (zigzagging paper streamers) used in Shinto rituals. The streamers are usually white, although they can also be gold, silver, or a mixture of several colors, and are often attached as decorations to straw ropes (shimenawa) used to mark sacred precincts. The shrine priest or maiden attendants (miko) use the gohei to bless or sanctify a person or object in various Shinto
Shinto
rituals. The gohei is used for some ceremonies, but its usual purpose is to cleanse a sacred place in temples and to cleanse, bless, or exorcise any object that is thought to have negative energy
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Glossary Of Sumo Terms
The following words are terms used in sumo wrestling in Japan. Banzuke
Banzuke
for Jan 2012 tournamentazukari (預り) Hold. A kind of draw. After a mono-ii, the gyōji or the shimpan "holds" the result if it was too close to call. In 1927, the system was abolished and a torinaoshi (rematch) now takes place instead. banzuke (番付) List of sumo wrestlers according to rank for a particular grand tournament, reflecting changes in rank due to the results of the previous tournament. It is written out in a particular calligraphy (see sumō-ji) and usually released on the Monday 13 days prior to the first day of the tournament. banzuke-gai (番付外) Outsider to the list. A wrestler who is not yet ranked, or has fallen off the banzuke due to injury or other reason for non-participation. basho (場所) Venue. Any sumo tournament. Compare honbasho. binzuke (鬢付け) Also called binzuke abura (binzuke oil)
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Dohyō-iri
The following words are terms used in sumo wrestling in Japan. Banzuke
Banzuke
for Jan 2012 tournamentazukari (預り) Hold. A kind of draw. After a mono-ii, the gyōji or the shimpan "holds" the result if it was too close to call. In 1927, the system was abolished and a torinaoshi (rematch) now takes place instead. banzuke (番付) List of sumo wrestlers according to rank for a particular grand tournament, reflecting changes in rank due to the results of the previous tournament. It is written out in a particular calligraphy (see sumō-ji) and usually released on the Monday 13 days prior to the first day of the tournament. banzuke-gai (番付外) Outsider to the list. A wrestler who is not yet ranked, or has fallen off the banzuke due to injury or other reason for non-participation. basho (場所) Venue. Any sumo tournament. Compare honbasho. binzuke (鬢付け) Also called binzuke abura (binzuke oil)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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