HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Onoe Kikugoro V
Onoe Kikugorō V
Onoe Kikugorō V
(五代目 尾上菊五郎, Godaime Onoe Kikugorō, 4 June 1844 – 18 February 1903) was a Japanese Kabuki
Kabuki
actor, one of the three most famous and celebrated of the Meiji period,[1] along with Ichikawa Danjūrō IX
Ichikawa Danjūrō IX
and Ichikawa Sadanji I. Unlike most kabuki actors, who specialize in a particular type of role, Kikugorō, as a kaneru yakusha, played both tachiyaku (male heroes) and onnagata (women) roles and was best known for his roles in plays by Kawatake Mokuami.[1] Kikugorō was also known as one of the chief actors in the "modern" subgenre of kabuki plays known as zangirimono ("cropped hair plays"), featuring Western-style clothes and hairstyle.[2] Kikugorō was a popular figure in ukiyo-e woodblock prints, especially in those by Toyohara Kunichika
[...More...]

"Onoe Kikugoro V" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kabuki
Kabuki
Kabuki
(歌舞伎) is a classical Japanese dance-drama. Kabuki
Kabuki
theatre is known for the stylization of its drama and for the elaborate make-up worn by some of its performers. The individual kanji, from left to right, mean sing (歌), dance (舞), and skill (伎). Kabuki
Kabuki
is therefore sometimes translated as "the art of singing and dancing". These are, however, ateji characters which do not reflect actual etymology. The kanji of 'skill' generally refers to a performer in kabuki theatre. Since the word kabuki is believed to derive from the verb kabuku, meaning "to lean" or "to be out of the ordinary", kabuki can be interpreted as "avant-garde" or "bizarre" theatre.[1] The expression kabukimono (歌舞伎者) referred originally to those who were bizarrely dressed
[...More...]

"Kabuki" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ulysses S. Grant
American Civil War American Civil War
American Civil War
ServiceCampaigns: Vicksburg Chattanooga Overland Petersburg AppomattoxGeneral Order No. 11Post-war army servicePresident of the United States Presidency1868 presidential campaignElection1st inauguration1872 reelection campaignElection2nd inaugurationReconstruction 15th AmendmentScandals Reforms Grantism Peace Policy Judicial AppointmentsPost-PresidencyLater life World tour 3rd term bid Tomb Memorial Historical reputation Depictions Memoirs Bibliographyv t eUlysses Simpson Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant;[a] April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American soldier and statesman who served as Commanding General of the Army and President of the United States, the highest positions in the military and the government of the United States
[...More...]

"Ulysses S. Grant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Zamoto
A zamoto (座元) is a manager of a kabuki theatre. Historically, the zamoto owned the theatre and was responsible for obtaining performance rights from the shōgun.[1] Typically the zamoto was often the latest son of the hereditary owners, such as at the Nakamura-za, Morita-za
Morita-za
and Ichimura-za. References[edit]^ Japan Quarterly, 1969, p. 302 (Asahi Shinbunsha)This article related to the culture of Japan is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis theatre-related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Zamoto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ichimura-za
The Ichimura-za
Ichimura-za
(市村座) was a major kabuki theatre in the Japanese capital of Edo
Edo
(later, Tokyo), for much of the Edo
Edo
period, and into the 20th century. It was first opened in 1634 and was run by members of the Ichimura family for much of the following nearly three centuries before it was destroyed by fire in 1932
[...More...]

"Ichimura-za" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bakumatsu
Bakumatsu
Bakumatsu
(幕末, bakumatsu, "the end (matsu) of the military government (baku, short for bakufu "tent-government")) refers to the final years of the Edo period
Edo period
when the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
ended. Between 1853 and 1867 Japan
Japan
ended its isolationist foreign policy known as sakoku and changed from a feudal Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
to the pre-modern empire of the Meiji government
[...More...]

"Bakumatsu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Benten Kozō
"Aoto Zōshi Hana no Nishiki-e" (青砥稿花紅彩画), as the original and fullest version of this play is known, is a tale in five acts of the shiranamimono (tales of thieves) sub-category of the kizewamono (rough contemporary piece) genre of kabuki plays. Written by Kawatake Mokuami, it first premiered at the Ichimura-za in Edo in March 1862. The play is frequently known by a number of other names. The name "Benten Kozō" (弁天小僧) actually refers to the main character of the play, a gizoku (honorable thief), one of a band of five such men. Another common name for this play is "Shiranami Gonin Otoko" (白浪五人男, "Five Men of the White Waves"), "shiranami" (white waves) being a term used to refer to thieves. Like most traditional Japanese dramas, the play originally had five acts, following particular conventions as to the dramatic pattern and themes of each act
[...More...]

"Benten Kozō" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nakamura-za
Nakamura-za
Nakamura-za
(中村座) was one of the three main kabuki theatres of Edo
Edo
alongside the Morita-za
Morita-za
and Ichimura-za.[1] It was founded in 1624 by Nakamura Kanzaburō 1st. The Nakamura-za
Nakamura-za
relocated to the new capital Tokyo
Tokyo
in 1868 and reopened under Nakamura Kanzaburō I's last direct descendant Nakamura Kanzaburo XIII (1828–1895) as zamoto.[2] It was later also called the Miyako-za (都座).[3] References[edit]^ Japanese Aesthetics and Culture: A Reader – Page 205 Nancy G. Hume – 1995 "While the Nakamura-za
Nakamura-za
in Edo
Edo
provides a detailed illustration of the physical design of a theater, it should be noted that no two were identical. Theaters were, moreover, periodically rebuilt, for fires frequently ravaged Edo
[...More...]

"Nakamura-za" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Shintomi-za
The Morita-za (森田座・守田座), also known later as the Shintomi-za (新富座), was one of the major Kabuki theaters in Edo (modern-day Tokyo) during the Edo period and into the beginning of the 20th century. It was established in January 1660, and run by the Morita family of actors until its destruction in the 1923 Great Kantō earthquake which destroyed much of Tokyo. History[edit] The Morita-za was first built by Morita Tarōbei I and his son Morita Tashichi in 1660, in Edo's Kobiki-chō district. The theater would burn down only a few months later, and many more times over the years, but was always rebuilt (until 1923). It was designated as one of only four theaters allowed to operate in Edo, by a 1670 government edict; the other three officially designated theaters were the Nakamura-za, Ichimura-Takenojō-za, and Yamamura-za
[...More...]

"Shintomi-za" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
[...More...]

"American Civil War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nakamura Shichinosuke II
Nakamura Shichinosuke II
Nakamura Shichinosuke II
(二代目 中村 七之助, Nidaime Nakamura Shichinosuke) (b. May 18, 1983) is a Japanese Kabuki, theatre, TV, and film actor. He was born Takayuki Namino (波野 隆行, Namino Takayuki),[1] the second son of famed Kabuki
Kabuki
performer, Nakamura Kanzaburō XVIII. Unlike many kabuki actors, who specialize in a single type of role, Shichinosuke plays both male (tachiyaku) and female (onnagata) parts.Contents1 Name and Lineage 2 Life and career 3 Filmography 4 Notes 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksName and Lineage[edit] Nakamura, often represented as "Shichinosuke Nakamura" in reference to his American film career, is a member of the kabuki guild Nakamura-ya, and currently performs kabuki along with his brother Nakamura Kantarō II
[...More...]

"Nakamura Shichinosuke II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Gosannen War
The Gosannen War (後三年合戦, gosannen kassen), also known as the Later Three-Year War, was fought in the late 1080s in Japan's Mutsu Province on the island of Honshū.[1]Contents1 History 2 Legacy in Art 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] The Gosannen War was part of a long struggle for power within the warrior clans of the time. The Gosannen kassen arose because of a series of quarrels within the Kiyohara clan (sometimes referred to as "Kiyowara"). The long-standing disturbances were intractable. When Minamoto no Yoshiie, who became Governor of Mutsu province
Mutsu province
in 1083, tried to calm the fighting which continued between Kiyohara no Masahira, Iehira, and Narihira.[2] Negotiations were not successful; and so Yoshiie used his own forces to stop the fighting. He was helped by Fujiwara no Kiyohira
[...More...]

"Gosannen War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Meiji Emperor
Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
(明治天皇, Meiji-tennō, November 3, 1852 – July 30, 1912), or Meiji the Great (明治大帝, Meiji-taitei), was the 122nd Emperor of Japan
Emperor of Japan
according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from February 3, 1867 until his death on July 30, 1912. He presided over a time of rapid change in the Empire of Japan, as the nation quickly changed from an isolationist feudal state to a capitalist and imperial world power, characterized by the Japanese industrial revolution. At the time of Meiji's birth in 1852, Japan
Japan
was an isolated, pre-industrial, feudal country dominated by the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
and the daimyōs, who ruled over the country's more than 250 decentralized domains
[...More...]

"Meiji Emperor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Battle Of Ueno
The Battle of Ueno
Battle of Ueno
(上野戦争, Ueno Sensō) was a battle of the Boshin War, which occurred on July 4, 1868 (Meiji 1, 15th day of the 5th month),[1] between the troops of the Shōgitai
[...More...]

"Battle Of Ueno" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kabuki-za
Kabuki-za
Kabuki-za
(歌舞伎座) in Ginza
Ginza
is the principal theater in Tokyo for the traditional kabuki drama form.[1]Contents1 History 2 Architecture 3 Performances 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Kabuki-za
Kabuki-za
was originally opened by a Meiji era journalist, Fukuchi Gen'ichirō. Fukuchi wrote kabuki dramas in which Ichikawa Danjūrō IX and others starred; upon Danjūrō's death in 1903, Fukuchi retired from the management of the theater
[...More...]

"Kabuki-za" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
[...More...]

"Library Of Congress Control Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.