HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Onboarding
Onboarding, also known as organizational socialization, refers to the mechanism through which new employees acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and behaviors to become effective organizational members and insiders.[1] It is the process of integrating a new employee into the organization and its culture.[2] Tactics used in this process include formal meetings, lectures, videos, printed materials, or computer-based orientations to introduce newcomers to their new jobs and organizations. Research has demonstrated that these socialization techniques lead to positive outcomes for new employees such as higher job satisfaction, better job performance, greater organizational commitment, and reduction in occupational stress and intent to quit.[3][4][5] These outcomes are particularly important to an organization looking to retain a competitive advantage in an increasingly mobile and globalized workforce
[...More...]

"Onboarding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Organizational Capital
Organizational capital is the value to an enterprise which is derived from organization philosophy and systems which leverage the organization’s capability in delivering goods or services.[1] Overview[edit] Organizational capital is one of the three components of structural capital, itself a component of intellectual capital.[2] But, as with other intangible assets, there is no consensus definition of what this organizational capital is, how to measure it, or how to best quantify its contribution to output (either current or future).[3] Organizational capital was first defined by Prescott and Visscher (1980) to be the accumulation and use of private information to enhance production efficiency within a firm
[...More...]

"Organizational Capital" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Senior Management
Senior management, executive management, or a management team is generally a team of individuals at the highest level of management of an organization who have the day-to-day tasks of managing that organization - sometimes a company or a corporation. They hold specific executive powers delegated to them with and by authority of a board of directors and/or the shareholders. Generally, higher levels of responsibility exist, such as a board of directors and those who own the company (shareholders) - but they focus on managing the senior or executive management instead of on the day-to-day activities of the business
[...More...]

"Senior Management" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Organizational Citizenship Behavior
In industrial and organizational psychology, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) is a person's voluntary commitment within an organization or company that is not part of his or her contractual tasks. Organizational citizenship behavior has been studied since the late 1970s. Over the past three decades, interest in these behaviors has increased substantially
[...More...]

"Organizational Citizenship Behavior" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Job Shadowing
Job shadowing (or work shadowing) is a popular on-the-job learning, career development, and leadership development program. It involves working with another employee who might have a different job in hand, might have something to teach, or can help the person shadowing him or her to learn new aspects related to the job, organization, certain behaviors or competencies. Organizations have been using this as an effective tool for learning[1]New job training: An individual planning to take up a different role in the same organization may be asked to shadow the current incumbent for a couple of days to months to get a better idea of his or her role, as well as understand the particulars of the same without the commitment of the responsibility. This helps the individual to be more confident, aware, and also better prepared to take up the role
[...More...]

"Job Shadowing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Productivity
Productivity
Productivity
describes various measures of the efficiency of production. A productivity measure is expressed as the ratio of output to inputs used in a production process, i.e. output per unit of input. Productivity
Productivity
is a crucial factor in production performance of firms and nations
[...More...]

"Productivity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Human Resource
Human resources are the people who make up the workforce of an organization, business sector, or economy. "Human capital" is sometimes used synonymously with "human resources", although human capital typically refers to a more narrow effect (i.e., the knowledge the individuals embody and economic growth)
[...More...]

"Human Resource" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Personnel Psychology
Personnel Psychology is a subfield of Industrial and Organizational Psychology.[1] Personnel psychology is the area of industrial/organizational psychology that primarily deals with the recruitment, selection and evaluation of personnel, and other job aspects such as morale, job satisfaction, and relationships between managers and workers in the workplace.[2] It is the field of study that concentrates on the selection and evaluation of employees; this area of psychology deals with job analysis and defines and measures job performance, performance appraisal, employment testing, employment interviews, employee selection and employee training, and human factors and ergonomics.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Twentieth Century 1.2 World War I 1.3 World War II 1.4 Twenty-first Century2 Uses2.1 Job Analysis 2.2 Selection 2.3 Training 2.4 Rewards 2.5 Feedback3 References 4 See alsoHistory[edit] Twentieth Century[edit] By the end of the nineteenth centur
[...More...]

"Personnel Psychology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Person-environment Fit
Person–environment fit (P–E fit) is defined as the degree to which individual and environmental characteristics match (Dawis, 1992; French, Caplan, & Harrison, 1982; Kristof-Brown, Zimmerman, & Johnson, 2005; Muchinsky & Monahan, 1987). Person characteristics may include an individual’s biological or psychological needs, values, goals, abilities, or personality, while environmental characteristics could include intrinsic and extrinsic rewards, demands of a job or role, cultural values, or characteristics of other individuals and collectives in the person's social environment (French et al., 1982)
[...More...]

"Person-environment Fit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American Psychological Association
The American Psychological Association
American Psychological Association
(APA) is the largest scientific and professional organization of psychologists in the United States,[2] with around 117,500 members including scientists, educators, clinicians, consultants, and students.[2] The APA has an annual budget of around $115m.[3] There are 54 divisions of the APA—interest groups covering different subspecialties of psychology or topical areas.[4]Contents1 Profile1.1 Governance 1.2 Good Governance Project 1.3 Organizational structure 1.4 Membership a
[...More...]

"American Psychological Association" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Employee Motivation
Employee motivation, i.e. methods for motivating employees, is an intrinsic and internal drive to put forth the necessary effort and action towards work-related activities. It has been broadly defined as the "psychological forces that determine the direction of a person's behavior in an organization, a person's level of effort and a person's level of persistence".[1] Also, "Motivation can be thought of as the willingness to expend energy to achieve a goal or a reward. Motivation at work has been defined as 'the sum of the processes that influence the arousal, direction, and maintenance of behaviors relevant to work settings'."[2]Motivated employees are essential to the success of an organization as motivated employees are generally more productive at the work place
[...More...]

"Employee Motivation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Power Distance
Power distance is the extent to which the lower ranking individuals of a society "accept and expect that power is distributed unequally".[1] It is primarily used in psychological and sociological studies on societal management of inequalities between individuals, and individual's perceptions of that management. People in societies with a high power distance are more likely to conform to a hierarchy where "everybody has a place and which needs no further justification".[1] In societies with a low power distance, individuals tend to try to distribute power equally
[...More...]

"Power Distance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Social Acceptance
Acceptance in human psychology is a person's assent to the reality of a situation, recognizing a process or condition (often a negative or uncomfortable situation) without attempting to change it or protest it. The concept is close in meaning to acquiescence, derived from the Latin acquiēscere (to find rest in).[1]Contents1 Definition 2 Types2.1 Self-acceptance 2.2 Social acceptance 2.3 Conditional 2.4 Expressed 2.5 Implied3 Beliefs 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksDefinition[edit] The term acceptance is a noun with various different meanings.[2] When the person to whom a proposal is made signifies their assent, it is an "acceptance" of their offer, also called an agreement. For example, if someone gives a gift and another receives it, then they have accepted the gift; therefore, having acceptance. Another definition of acceptance has to do with positive welcome and belonging, favor, and endorsement
[...More...]

"Social Acceptance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Self-efficacy
Self-efficacy is defined as a personal judgement of "how well one can execute courses of action required to deal with prospective situations".[1] Expectations of self-efficacy determine whether an individual will be able to exhibit coping behavior and how long effort will be sustained in the face of obstacles.[2] Individuals who have high self-efficacy will exert sufficient effort that, if well executed, leads to successful outcomes, whereas those with low self-efficacy are likely to cease effort early and fail.[2] Psychologists have studied self-efficacy from several perspectives, noting various paths in the development of self-efficacy; the dynamics of self-efficacy, and lack thereof, in many different settings; interactions between self-efficacy and self-concept; and habits of attribution that contribute to, or detract from, self-efficacy. Self-efficacy affects every area of human endeavor
[...More...]

"Self-efficacy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.