HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

On The Genealogy Of Morality
On the Genealogy of Morality: A Polemic (German: Zur Genealogie der Moral: Eine Streitschrift) is an 1887 book by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. It consists of a preface and three interrelated essays that expand and follow through on concepts Nietzsche sketched out in Beyond Good and Evil
Beyond Good and Evil
(1886)
[...More...]

"On The Genealogy Of Morality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

St Vitus
Saint Vitus (/vaɪtəs/), according to Christian legend, was a Christian saint from Sicily. He died as a martyr during the persecution of Christians by co-ruling Roman Emperors Diocletian and Maximian in 303. Vitus is counted as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers of medieval Roman Catholicism. Saint Vitus' Day is celebrated on 15 June. In places where the Julian Calendar is used, this date coincides, in the 20th and 21st centuries, with 28 June on the Gregorian Calendar. In the late Middle Ages, people in Germany and countries such as Latvia celebrated the feast of Vitus by dancing before his statue. This dancing became popular and the name "Saint Vitus Dance" was given to the neurological disorder Sydenham's chorea. It also led to Vitus being considered the patron saint of dancers and of entertainers in general.[1] Vitus is considered the patron saint of actors, comedians, dancers, and epileptics, similarly to Genesius of Rome
[...More...]

"St Vitus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Hysteria
Hysteria, in the colloquial use of the term, means ungovernable emotional excess. Generally, modern medical professionals have abandoned using the term "hysteria" to denote a diagnostic category, replacing it with more precisely defined categories, such as somatization disorder. In 1980, the American Psychiatric Association officially changed the diagnosis of "hysterical neurosis, conversion type" (the most extreme and effective type) to "conversion disorder". While the word "hysteria" originates from the Greek word for uterus, hystera, the word itself is not an ancient one, and the term "hysterical suffocation" — meaning a feeling of heat and inability to breathe — was instead used in ancient Greek medicine
[...More...]

"Hysteria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Malaria
Malaria
Malaria
is a mosquito-borne infectious disease affecting humans and other animals caused by parasitic protozoans (a group of single-celled microorganisms) belonging to the Plasmodium
Plasmodium
type.[2]
[...More...]

"Malaria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Syphilis
Syphilis
Syphilis
is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum
Treponema pallidum
subspecies pallidum.[2] The signs and symptoms of syphilis vary depending in which of the four stages it presents (prim
[...More...]

"Syphilis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thirty Years' War
Peace of Westphalia Protestant
Protestant
princes allowed to continue religious practices Decline of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church<

[...More...]

"Thirty Years' War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ethics
Ethics
Ethics
or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.[1] The term ethics derives from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ἠθικός (ethikos), from ἦθος (ethos), meaning 'habit, custom'. The branch of philosophy axiology comprises the sub-branches of ethics and aesthetics, each concerned with values.[2] Ethics
Ethics
seeks to resolve questions of human morality by defining concepts such as good and evil, right and wrong, virtue and vice, justice and crime
[...More...]

"Ethics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dancing Mania
Dancing mania
Dancing mania
(also known as dancing plague, choreomania, St. John's Dance
Dance
and St. Vitus's Dance) was a social phenomenon that occurred primarily in mainland Europe between the 14th and 17th centuries. It involved groups of people dancing erratically, sometimes thousands at a time. The mania affected men, women, and children who danced until they collapsed from exhaustion. One of the first major outbreaks was in Aachen, in the Holy Roman Empire, in 1374, and it quickly spread throughout Europe; one particularly notable outbreak occurred in Strasbourg
Strasbourg
in 1518, also in the Holy Roman Empire. Affecting thousands of people across several centuries, dancing mania was not an isolated event, and was well documented in contemporary reports. It was nevertheless poorly understood, and remedies were based on guesswork
[...More...]

"Dancing Mania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Witch-hunt
A witch-hunt is a search for people labelled "witches" or evidence of witchcraft, often involving moral panic[1] or mass hysteria.[2] The classical period of witch-hunts in Early Modern Europe
Early Modern Europe
and Colonial North America took place in the Early Modern period
[...More...]

"Witch-hunt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Somnambulism
Sleepwalking, also known as somnambulism or noctambulism, is a phenomenon of combined sleep and wakefulness.[1] It is classified as a sleep disorder belonging to the parasomnia family.[2] It occurs during slow wave sleep stage, in a state of low consciousness, with performance of activities that are usually performed during a state of full consciousness. These activities can be as benign as sitting up in bed, walking to a bathroom, and cleaning, or as hazardous as cooking, driving,[3] violent gestures, grabbing at hallucinated objects,[4] or even homicide.[5][6] Although sleepwalking cases generally consist of simple, repeated behaviours, there are occasionally reports of people performing complex behaviours while asleep, although their legitimacy is often disputed.[7] Sleepwalkers often have little or no memory of the incident, as their consciousness has altered into a state in which it is harder to recall memories
[...More...]

"Somnambulism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4
[...More...]

"Paris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Teleology
Teleology
Teleology
or finality[1][2] is a reason or explanation for something in function of its end, purpose or goal.[3] It is derived from two Greek words: telos (end, goal, purpose) and logos (reason, explanation). A purpose that is imposed by a human use, such as that of a fork, is called extrinsic.[4] Natural teleology, common in classical philosophy but controversial today,[5] contends that natural entities also have intrinsic purposes, irrespective of human use or opinion. For instance, Aristotle
Aristotle
claimed that an acorn's intrinsic telos is to become a fully grown oak tree.[6] Though ancient atomists rejected the notion of natural teleology, teleological accounts of non-personal or non-human nature were explored and often endorsed in ancient and medieval philosophies, but fell into disfavor during the modern era (1600–1900)
[...More...]

"Teleology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ernest Renan
Joseph Ernest Renan
Ernest Renan
(French: [ʁənɑ̃]; 28 February 1823 – 2 October 1892[2]) was a French expert of Semitic languages and civilizations (philology), philosopher, historian, and writer, devoted to his native province of Brittany. He is best known for his influential historical works on early Christianity, and his political theories, especially concerning nationalism and national identity
[...More...]

"Ernest Renan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Heinrich Heine
Christian Johann Heinrich Heine
Heinrich Heine
(German: [ˈhaɪnʁɪç ˈhaɪnə]; 13 December 1797 – 17 February 1856) was a German poet, journalist, essayist, and literary critic. He is best known outside of Germany
Germany
for his early lyric poetry, which was set to music in the form of Lieder (art songs) by composers such as Robert Schumann
Robert Schumann
and Franz Schubert. Heine's later verse and prose are distinguished by their satirical wit and irony. He is considered part of the Young Germany
Germany
movement. His radical political views led to many of his works being banned by German authorities
[...More...]

"Heinrich Heine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Genealogical Method
The genealogical method is a well-established procedure in ethnography. It was initiated by early ethnographers to identify all-important links of kinship determined by marriage and descent. Genealogy or kinship commonly plays a crucial role in the structure of non-industrial societies, determining both social relations and group relationship to the past. Marriage, for example, is frequently pivotal in determining military alliances between villages, clans or ethnic groups. In the field of epistemology the term has come to be used, by extension, to characterize the philosophical method employed by such writers as Friedrich Nietzsche and Michel Foucault. References[edit]Windows on Humanity by Conrad Phillip Kottak. Chapter 2, page 38.This article about ethnicity or ethnology is a stub
[...More...]

"Genealogical Method" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Epistemology
Related concepts and fundamentals:Agnosticism Epistemology Presupposition Probabilityv t e Epistemology
Epistemology
(/ɪˌpɪstɪˈmɒlədʒi/ ( listen); from Greek ἐπιστήμη, epistēmē, meaning 'knowledge', and λόγος, logos, meaning 'logical discourse') is the branch of philosophy concerned with the theory of knowledge.[1] Epistemology
Epistemology
studies the nature of knowledge, justification, and the rationality of belief. Much of the debate in epistemology centers on four areas: (1) the philosophical analysis of the nature of knowledge and how it relates to such concepts as truth, belief, and justification,[2][3] (2) various problems of skepticism, (3) the sources and scope of knowledge and justified belief, and (4) the criteria for knowledge and justification
[...More...]

"Epistemology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.