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Olympic Schedule (Competitions) Pentathlon
A pentathlon is a contest featuring five events. The name is derived from Greek: combining the words pente (five) and -athlon (competition) (Greek: πένταθλον). The first pentathlon was documented in Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
and was part of the Ancient Olympic Games. Five events were contested over one day for the Ancient Olympic pentathlon, starting with the long jump, javelin throwing, and discus throwing, followed by the stadion (a short foot race) and wrestling. Pentathletes were considered to be among the most skilled athletes, and their training was often part of military service—each of the five events in the pentathlon was thought to be useful in war or battle. With the revival of the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
in the modern era, the pentathlon returned in two formats. The athletics pentathlon was a modern variation on the original events, with a competition over five track and field events
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Pentathlon (other)
A pentathlon (Ancient Greek: Πένταθλον) is any sporting competition including five events. Pentathlon
Pentathlon
may refer to: Sports[edit] There are many specific pentathlons consisting of certain sets of events.Ancient Olympic pentathlon, an Ancient Greek game comprising long jump, javelin, discus, foot race, and wrestling Modern pentathlon, a combined sport for modern Olympic Games Athletics pentathlon, a combined sport of five track and field eventsClassic pentathlon, a men's Olympic event from 1906 to 192
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Pankration
Pankration
Pankration
(/pænˈkreɪtiɒn, pæŋˈkreɪʃən/; Greek: παγκράτιον) was a sporting event introduced into the Greek Olympic Games
Olympic Games
in 648 BC and was an empty-hand submission sport with scarcely any rules. The athletes used boxing and wrestling techniques, but also others, such as kicking and holds, locks and chokes on the ground
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Perseus
In Greek mythology, Perseus
Perseus
(/ˈpɜːrsiəs, -sjuːs/; Greek: Περσεύς) is the legendary founder of Mycenae
Mycenae
and of the Perseid dynasty, who, alongside Cadmus
Cadmus
and Bellerophon, was the greatest Greek hero and slayer of monsters before the days of Heracles.[1] He beheaded the Gorgon
Gorgon
Medusa
Medusa
for Polydectes
Polydectes
and saved Andromeda from the sea monster Cetus
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Acrisius
In Greek mythology, Acrisius
Acrisius
(/əˈkraɪsiəs/; Greek: Ἀκρίσιος) was a king of Argos. Contents1 Family 2 Mythology2.1 Rivalry of Twins 2.2 Death 2.3 Founder of Delphic amphictyony3 Argive genealogy chart 4 ReferencesFamily[edit] Acrisius
Acrisius
was the son of Abas and Aglaea[1] (or Ocalea, depending on the author), grandson of Lynceus, great-grandson of Danaus. He was the twin brother of Proetus, father by Eurydice of Danae and thus grandfather of the hero Perseus
Perseus
by her. Mythology[edit] Rivalry of Twins[edit] Acrisius
Acrisius
and Proetus was said to have quarreled even in the womb of their mother and when Abas died and Acrisius
Acrisius
had grown up, he expelled Proetus from his inheritance
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Discus
The discus throw ( pronunciation) is a track and field event in which an athlete throws a heavy disc—called a discus—in an attempt to mark a farther distance than their competitors. It is an ancient sport, as demonstrated by the fifth-century-BC Myron
Myron
statue, Discobolus
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Jason
Jason
Jason
(/ˈdʒeɪsən/; Greek: Ἰάσων Iásōn) was an ancient Greek mythological hero who was the leader of the Argonauts
Argonauts
whose quest for the Golden Fleece
Golden Fleece
featured in Greek literature. He was the son of Aeson, the rightful king of Iolcos. He was married to the sorceress Medea. He was also the great-grandson of the messenger god Hermes, through his mother's side. Jason
Jason
appeared in various literary works in the classical world of Greece and Rome, including the epic poem Argonautica
Argonautica
and the tragedy Medea
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Peleus
In Greek mythology, Peleus
Peleus
(/ˈpiːliəs, ˈpiːljuːs, ˈpɛliəs, ˈpɛljuːs/; Greek: Πηλεύς, Pēleus) was a hero whose myth was already known to the hearers of Homer
Homer
in the late 8th century BC.[1] Peleus
Peleus
was the son of Aeacus, king of the island of Aegina,[2] and Endeïs, the oread of Mount Pelion
Pelion
in Thessaly.[3] He married the sea-nymph Thetis
Thetis
with whom he fathered Achilles. Peleus
Peleus
and his brother Telamon
Telamon
were friends of Heracles, and served in Heracles' expedition against the Amazons, his war against King Laomedon, and his quest for the Golden Fleece
Golden Fleece
alongside Jason
Jason
and the Argonauts
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Rhetoric (Aristotle)
[*]: Authenticity disputed strikethrough: Generally agreed to be spuriousv t eAristotle's Rhetoric (Ancient Greek: Ῥητορική, translit. Rhētorikḗ; Latin: Ars Rhetorica[1]) is an ancient Greek treatise on the art of persuasion, dating from the 4th century BC
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Aristotle
Aristotle
Aristotle
(/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/;[3] Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs, pronounced [aristotélɛːs]; 384–322 BC)[A] was a philosopher during the Classical period in Ancient Greece, the founder of the Lyceum and the Peripatetic school
Peripatetic school
of philosophy and Aristotelian tradition. Along with his teacher Plato, he is considered the "Father of Western Philosophy". His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government. Aristotle
Aristotle
provided a complex synthesis of the various philosophies existing prior to him, and it was above all from his teachings that the West inherited its intellectual lexicon, as well as problems and methods of inquiry
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Ferdinand Bie
Ferdinand Reinhardt Bie (16 February 1888 – 9 November 1961) was a Norwegian track and field athlete. At the 1912 Summer Olympics
1912 Summer Olympics
in Stockholm
Stockholm
he won the silver medal in pentathlon. On winner Jim Thorpe's subsequent disqualification for professionalism in 1913, Bie was declared Olympic champion, but refused to accept the gold medal from the IOC.[1] In 1982 Thorpe was reinstated as champion by the IOC; however, Bie was still listed as co-champion.[2] He also finished eleventh in the long jump, and competed in 110 metres hurdles
110 metres hurdles
and decathlon, but failed to finish.[3] He became Norwegian champion in long jump in 1910 and 1917[4] and in 110 m hurdles in 1910.[5] References[edit]^ Jim Reisler (26 November 2008). Cash and Carry: The Spectacular Rise and Hard Fall of C.C. Pyle, America's First Sports Agent. McFarland. pp. 60–
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Athletics (sport)
Athletics is a collection of sporting events that involve competitive running, jumping, throwing, and walking.[1] The most common types of athletics competitions are track and field, road running, cross country running, and race walking. The results of racing events are decided by finishing position (or time, where measured), while the jumps and throws are won by the athlete that achieves the highest or furthest measurement from a series of attempts. The simplicity of the competitions, and the lack of a need for expensive equipment, makes athletics one of the most commonly competed sports in the world. Athletics is mostly an individual sport, with the exception of relay races and competitions which combine athletes' performances for a team score, such as cross country. Organized athletics are traced back to the Ancient Olympic Games
Olympic Games
from 776 BC
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Boxing
Boxing
Boxing
is a combat sport in which two people, usually wearing protective gloves, throw punches at each other for a predetermined set of time in a boxing ring. Amateur boxing
Amateur boxing
is both an Olympic and Commonwealth Games
Commonwealth Games
sport and is a common fixture in most international games—it also has its own World Championships. Boxing
Boxing
is supervised by a referee over a series of one- to three-minute intervals called rounds. The result is decided when an opponent is deemed incapable to continue by a referee, is disqualified for breaking a rule, resigns by throwing in a towel, or is pronounced the winner or loser based on the judges' scorecards at the end of the contest. In the event that both fighters gain equal scores from the judges, the fight is considered a draw (professional boxing)
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1906 Olympic Games
The 1906 Intercalated Games
Intercalated Games
or 1906 Olympic Games
Olympic Games
was an international multi-sport event that was celebrated in Athens, Greece
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Panhellenic Games
Panhellenic Games is the collective term for four separate sports festivals held in ancient Greece. The four Games were:Games God Honored Location Prize FrequencyOlympic Games Zeus Olympia, Elis Olive wreath (Kotinos) Every 4 yearsPythian Games Apollo Delphi Laurel wreath Every 4 years (2 years after the Olympic Games)Nemean Games Zeus, Heracles Nemea, Corinthia Wild celery Every 2 years (2nd and 4th year of Olympiads)Isthmian Games Poseidon Isthmia, Sicyon Pine Every 2 years (year before and year after Ancient Olympics)Description[edit] The Olympiad
Olympiad
was one of the ways the Greeks measured time
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Athens
Athens
Athens
(/ˈæθɪnz/;[3] Greek: Αθήνα, Athína [aˈθina], Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece
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