HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Olympiads
An Olympiad
Olympiad
(Greek: Ὀλυμπιάς, Olympiás) is a period of four years associated with the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
of the Ancient Greeks. During the Hellenistic period, beginning with Ephorus, it was used as a calendar epoch. Converting to the modern BC/AD dating system the first Olympiad
Olympiad
began in the summer of 776 BC and lasted until the summer of 772 BC, when the second Olympiad
Olympiad
would begin with the commencement of the next games. By extrapolation to the Gregorian calendar, the 2nd year of the 699th Olympiad
Olympiad
begins in (Northern-Hemisphere) mid-summer 2018. A modern Olympiad
Olympiad
refers to a four-year period beginning on the opening of the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
for the summer sports
[...More...]

"Olympiads" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Olympia, Greece
Olympia (Greek: Ὀλυμπία; Ancient Greek: [olympía]; Modern Greek: [oli(m)ˈbia] Olymbía), a sanctuary of ancient Greece
Greece
in Elis
Elis
on the
[...More...]

"Olympia, Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Solstice
A solstice is an event occurring when the Sun
Sun
appears to reach its most northerly or southerly excursion relative to the celestial equator on the celestial sphere. Two solstices occur annually, around June 21 and December 21. The seasons of the year are directly connected to both the solstices and the equinoxes. The term solstice can also be used in a broader sense, as the day when this occurs. The day of the solstice in either hemisphere has either the most sunlight of the year (summer solstice) or the least sunlight of the year (winter solstice) for any place other than the Equator. Alternative terms, with no ambiguity as to which hemisphere is the context, are June solstice and December solstice, referring to the months of year in which they take place. [2] At latitudes outside the tropics, the summer solstice marks the day when the Sun
Sun
appears to reach its highest point in the sky
[...More...]

"Solstice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dionysius Of Halicarnassus
Dionysius of Halicarnassus
Halicarnassus
(Greek: Διονύσιος Αλεξάνδρου Αλικαρνασσεύς Dionysios Alexandrou Alikarnassefs; "Dionysios son of Alexandros of Halikarnassos"; c. 60 BC – after 7 BC) was a Greek historian and teacher of rhetoric, who flourished during the reign of Caesar Augustus
[...More...]

"Dionysius Of Halicarnassus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Foundation Of Rome
The founding of Rome
Rome
can be investigated through archaeology, but traditional stories handed down by the ancient Romans themselves explain the earliest history of their city in terms of legend and myth. The most familiar of these myths, and perhaps the most famous of all Roman myths, is the story of Romulus
[...More...]

"Foundation Of Rome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Charops (mythology)
In Greek mythology, the name Charops or Charopus ("bright-eyed") may refer to:King of Syme, father of Nireus by Aglaea.[1][2][3][4] A Thracian, father of Oeagrus. He warned Dionysus
Dionysus
of Lycurgus plotting against him, and was granted in reward with the knowledge of secret rites; the kingdom of Thrace was also handed over to him after the defeat of Lycurgus.[5] A defender of Troy, son of Hippasus and brother of Socus. Was killed by Odysseus.[6][7] Husband of Oia, the daughter of Cephalus
Cephalus
and eponym of the deme Oia, Attica.[8] One of Actaeon's dogs.[9] A surname of Heracles, under which he had a statue near mount Laphystion on the spot where he was believed to have brought forth Cerberus
Cerberus
from Hades.[10]References[edit] Greek mythology
Greek mythology
portal^ Homer, Iliad, 2. 672 ^ Bibliotheca Epitome of Book 4, 3
[...More...]

"Charops (mythology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Diodorus Siculus
Diodorus Siculus
Diodorus Siculus
(/ˌdaɪəˈdɔːrəs ˈsɪkjʊləs/; Greek: Διόδωρος Σικελιώτης Diodoros Sikeliotes) (fl. 1st century BC) or Diodorus of Sicily
Sicily
was a Greek historian. He is known for writing the monumental universal history Bibliotheca historica, much of which survives, between 60 and 30 BC. It is arranged in three parts. The first covers mythic history up to the destruction of Troy, arranged geographically, describing regions around the world from Egypt, India
India
and Arabia
Arabia
to Greece
Greece
and Europe. The second covers the Trojan War
Trojan War
to the death of Alexander the Great. The third covers the period to about 60 BC
[...More...]

"Diodorus Siculus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jerome
Catholicism portal Philosophy
Philosophy
portalv t e Jerome
Jerome
(/dʒəˈroʊm/; Latin: Eusebius
Eusebius
Sophronius Hieronymus; Greek: Εὐσέβιος Σωφρόνιος Ἱερώνυμος; c. 27 March 347 – 30 September 420) was a priest, confessor, theologian, and historian. He was born at Stridon, a village near Emona
Emona
on the border of Dalmatia and Pannonia.[2][3][4] He is best known for his translation of most of the Bible
Bible
into Latin
Latin
(the translation that became known as the Vulgate), and his commentaries on the Gospels. His list of writings is extensive.[5] The protégé of Pope
Pope
Damasus I, who died in December of 384, Jerome was known for his teachings on Christian moral life, especially to those living in cosmopolitan centers such as Rome
[...More...]

"Jerome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jesus Christ
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
[...More...]

"Jesus Christ" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Augustus
Augustus
Augustus
(Latin: Imperator
Imperator
Caesar Divi filius Augustus;[note 1] 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD) was a Roman statesman and military leader who served as the first Emperor of the Roman Empire, controlling Imperial Rome
Rome
from 27 BC until his death in AD 14.[note 2] His status as the founder of the Roman Principate
Principate
has consolidated an enduring legacy as one of the most effective and controversial leaders in human history.[1][2] He was born Gaius Octavius Thurinus into an old and wealthy equestrian branch of the plebeian gens Octavia. His maternal great-uncle Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 BC, and Octavius was named in Caesar's will as his adopted son and heir
[...More...]

"Augustus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Full Moon
The full moon is the lunar phase when the Moon
Moon
appears fully illuminated from Earth's perspective. This occurs when Earth
Earth
is located directly between the Sun
Sun
and the Moon
Moon
(more exactly, when the ecliptic longitudes of the Sun
Sun
and Moon
Moon
differ by 180°). This means that the lunar hemisphere facing Earth
Earth
– the near side – is completely sunlit and appears as a circular disk, while the far side is dark
[...More...]

"Full Moon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Metonic Cycle
For astronomy and calendar studies, the Metonic cycle
Metonic cycle
or Enneadecaeteris (from Ancient Greek: ἐννεακαιδεκαετηρίς, "nineteen years") is a period of very close to 19 years that is nearly a common multiple of the solar year and the synodic (lunar) month. The Greek astronomer Meton of Athens (fifth century BC) observed that a period of 19 years is almost exactly equal to 235 synodic months and, rounded to full days, counts 6,940 days. The difference between the two periods (of 19 years and 235 synodic months) is only a few hours, depending on the definition of the year. Considering a year to be ​1⁄19 of this 6,940-day cycle gives a year length of 365 + ​1⁄4 + ​1⁄76 days (the unrounded cycle is much more accurate), which is about 11 days more than 12 synodic months
[...More...]

"Metonic Cycle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eleians
Elis
Elis
/ˈɛlɪs/ or Eleia /ɛˈlaɪ.ə/ (Greek, Modern: Ήλιδα Ilida, Ancient: Ἦλις Ēlis; Doric: Ἆλις Alis; Elean: Ϝαλις Walis, ethnonym: Ϝαλειοι) is an ancient district that corresponds to the modern Elis
Elis
regional unit. Elis
Elis
is in southern Greece
Greece
on the Peloponnesos
Peloponnesos
peninsula, bounded on the north by Achaea, east by Arcadia, south by Messenia, and west by the Ionian Sea
[...More...]

"Eleians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western)
[...More...]

"Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.