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Olot
Olot
Olot
(Catalan pronunciation: [uˈɫɔt]) is the capital city of the comarca of Garrotxa, in the Province of Girona, Catalonia, Spain. The city is known for its natural landscape, including four volcanoes scattered around the city center. The municipality is part of the Garrotxa
Garrotxa
Volcanic Zone Natural Park
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Conurbation
This article needs attention from an expert in Cities. Please add a reason or a talk parameter to this template to explain the issue with the article. WikiProject Cities may be able to help recruit an expert. (November 2015)A conurbation is a region comprising a number of cities, large towns, and other urban areas that, through population growth and physical expansion, have merged to form one continuous urban or industrially developed area. In most cases, a conurbation is a polycentric urbanised area, in which transportation has developed to link areas to create a single urban labour market or travel to work area.[1] The term "conurbation" was coined in 1915 by Patrick Geddes
Patrick Geddes
in his book Cities In Evolution
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Neoclassical Architecture
Neoclassical architecture
Neoclassical architecture
is an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century. In its purest form, it is a style principally derived from the architecture of classical antiquity, the Vitruvian principles, and the work of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio.[1] In form, neoclassical architecture emphasizes the wall rather than chiaroscuro and maintains separate identities to each of its parts. The style is manifested both in its details as a reaction against the Rococo
Rococo
style of naturalistic ornament, and in its architectural formulae as an outgrowth of some classicising features of the Late Baroque
Baroque
architectural tradition
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Municipalities Of Catalonia
A municipality is usually a single urban or administrative division having corporate status and powers of self-government or jurisdiction as granted by national and state laws to which it is subordinate
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Ratafia
Ratafia
Ratafia
is a term used for two types of sweet alcoholic beverage, either a fortified wine or a fruit-based beverage. The former is a type of mistelle, a mixture of marc brandy and the unfermented juice of the grape, and is the type produced in France. The latter is a liqueur or cordial flavoured with lemon peel and herbs in various amounts (nutmeg, cinnamon, clove, mint, rosemary, anise, etc.), typically combined with sugar. It may also be prepared with peach or cherry kernels, bitter almonds, or other fruits, as many different varieties are made. The liqueur is typical of the Mediterranean areas of Spain, Italy, and north-east of France
France
(Champagne and Burgundy)
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Discharge (hydrology)
In hydrology, discharge is the volumetric flow rate of water that is transported through a given cross-sectional area.[1] It includes any suspended solids (e.g. sediment), dissolved chemicals (e.g. CaCO3(aq)), or biologic material (e.g. diatoms) in addition to the water itself. Synonyms vary by discipline. For example, a fluvial hydrologist studying natural river systems may define discharge as streamflow, whereas an engineer operating a reservoir system might define discharge as outflow, which is contrasted with inflow.Contents1 Theory and calculation 2 Catchment discharge 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTheory and calculation[edit] GH Dury and MJ Bradshaw are two hydrologists who devised the models showing the relationship between discharge and other variables in a river
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Humid
Humidity
Humidity
is the amount of water vapor present in the air. Water vapor is the gaseous state of water and is invisible to the human eye.[1] Humidity
Humidity
indicates the likelihood of precipitation, dew, or fog. Higher humidity reduces the effectiveness of sweating in cooling the body by reducing the rate of evaporation of moisture from the skin. This effect is calculated in a heat index table or humidex. The amount of water vapor that is needed to achieve saturation increases as the temperature increases. As the temperature of a parcel of water becomes lower it will eventually reach the point of saturation without adding or losing water mass. The differences in the amount of water vapor in a parcel of air can be quite large
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Volcanic Cone
Volcanic cones are among the simplest volcanic landforms. They are built by ejecta from a volcanic vent, piling up around the vent in the shape of a cone with a central crater. Volcanic cones are of different types, depending upon the nature and size of the fragments ejected during the eruption. Types of volcanic cones include stratocones, spatter cones, tuff cones, and cinder cones.[1][2]Contents1 Stratocone 2 Spatter cone 3 Tuff
Tuff
cones (ash cones) 4 Cinder cone 5 Rootless cones 6 ReferencesStratocone[edit] Main article: StratovolcanoOsorno volcano in Chile is an example of a well-developed stratocone.Stratocones are large cone-shaped volcanoes made up of lava flows, explosively erupted pyroclastic rocks, and igneous intrusives that are typically centered around a cylindrical vent. Unlike shield volcanoes, they are characterized by a steep profile and periodic, often alternating, explosive eruptions and effusive eruptions
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Francis Of Assisi
Saint Francis of Assisi
Assisi
(Italian: San Francesco d'Assisi), born Giovanni di Pietro di Bernardone, informally named as Francesco (1181/1182 – 3 October 1226),[2] was an Italian Catholic friar, deacon and preacher. He founded the men's Order of Friars Minor, the women’s Order of Saint Clare, the Third Order of Saint Francis and the Custody of the Holy Land. Francis is one of the most venerated religious figures in history.[3] Pope Gregory IX
Pope Gregory IX
canonized Francis on 16 July 1228. Along with Saint Catherine of Siena, he was designated Patron saint
Patron saint
of Italy. He later became associated with patronage of animals and the natural environment, and it became customary for Catholic
Catholic
and Anglican churches to hold ceremonies blessing animals on his feast day of 4 October. He is often remembered as the patron saint of animals
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9th Century
The 9th century
9th century
is the period from 801
801
to 900
900
in accordance with the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
in the Common Era.Contents1 West Africa1.1 Southeastern Nigeria 1.2 Ghana Empire2 Western Europe2.1 Britain and Ireland 2.2 Art of the 9th century3 Events 4 Significant people 5 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 6 See also 7 ReferencesWest Africa[edit]A bronze ceremonial vessel made around the 9th century, one of the bronzes found at Igbo-Ukwu.[1]Southeastern Nigeria[edit] Further information: Archaeology of Igbo-Ukwu Around the 9th century
9th century
the edo people of what is now southeastern Nigeria
Nigeria
developed bronze casts of humans, animals, and mythical creatures
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Coca
Coca
Coca
is any of the four cultivated plants in the family Erythroxylaceae, native to western South America. The plant is grown as a cash crop in Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, even in areas where its cultivation is unlawful.[2] There are some reports that the plant is being cultivated in the south of Mexico
Mexico
as a cash crop and an alternative to smuggling its recreational product cocaine.[3] It also plays a role in many traditional Andean cultures as well as the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (see Traditional uses). Coca
Coca
is known throughout the world for its psychoactive alkaloid, cocaine. The alkaloid content of coca leaves is relatively low, between 0.25% and 0.77%.[4] The native people use it for a stimulant, like coffee, or an energy source or both
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1763
1763
1763
was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1763rd year of the Common Era
Common Era
(CE) and Anno Domini
Anno Domini
(AD) designations, the 763rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1760s
1760s
decade
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El Greco
Doménikos Theotokópoulos (Greek: Δομήνικος Θεοτοκόπουλος [ðoˈminikos θeotoˈkopulos]; 1541 – 7 April 1614), most widely known as El Greco
El Greco
("The Greek"), was a painter, sculptor and architect of the Spanish Renaissance. "El Greco" was a nickname,[a][b] a reference to his Greek origin, and the artist normally signed his paintings with his full birth name in Greek letters, Δομήνικος Θεοτοκόπουλος (Doménikos Theotokópoulos), often adding the word Κρής (Krēs, "Cretan"). El Greco
El Greco
was born in the Kingdom of Candia, which was at that time part of the Republic of Venice, and the center of Post-Byzantine art. He trained and became a master within that tradition before traveling at age 26 to Venice, as other Greek artists had done.[2] In 1570 he moved to Rome, where he opened a workshop and executed a series of works
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Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
(/ˌɑːrt nuːˈvoʊ, ˌɑːr/; French: [aʁ nuvo]) is an international style of art, architecture and applied art, especially the decorative arts, that was most popular between 1890 and 1910.[1] A reaction to the academic art of the 19th century, it was inspired by natural forms and structures, particularly the curved lines of plants and flowers. English uses the French name Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
(new art)
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1783
1783
1783
was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1783rd year of the Common Era
Common Era
(CE) and Anno Domini
Anno Domini
(AD) designations, the 783rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 83rd year of the 18th century, and the 4th year of the 1780s
1780s
decade
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