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Oldfield Thomas
Michael Rogers Oldfield Thomas
Oldfield Thomas
FRS FZS (21 February 1858 – 16 June 1929) was a British zoologist.[1][2][3]Contents1 Career 2 Taxonomic descriptions2.1 Higher ranks 2.2 Genera 2.3 Species3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Thomas worked at the Natural History Museum on mammals, describing about 2,000 new species and subspecies for the first time. He was appointed to the Museum Secretary's office in 1876, transferring to the Zoological Department in 1878. In 1891 Thomas married Mary Kane, daughter of Sir Andrew Clark, heiress to a small fortune, which gave him the finances to hire mammal collectors and present their specimens to the museum. He also did field work himself in western Europe and South America
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Anisomys
The squirrel-toothed rat, New Guinea giant rat, powerful-toothed rat, uneven-toothed rat, or narrow-toothed giant rat (Anisomys imitator),[2] is a species of rodent in the family Muridae. It is the only species in the genus Anisomys. It is found in West Papua, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. References[edit]^ Leary, T.; Seri, L.; Flannery, T.; Wright, D.; Hamilton, S.; Helgen, K.; Singadan, R.; Allison, A.; James, R.; Bonaccorso, F.; et al. (2008). "Anisomys imitator". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 14 February 2009.  ^ Wrobel, Murray (2006). Elsevier's Dictionary of Mammals: In Latin, English, German, French and Italian. Elsevier. ISBN 0-444-51877-0. Musser, G.G.; Carleton, M.D. (2005). "Superfamily Muroidea". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 894–1531
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Mammal
Mammals are the vertebrates within the class Mammalia (/məˈmeɪliə/ from Latin mamma "breast"), a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles (including birds) by the possession of a neocortex (a region of the brain), hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands. Females of all mammal species nurse their young with milk, secreted from the mammary glands. Mammals include the largest animal on the planet, the blue whale. The basic body type is a terrestrial quadruped, but some mammals are adapted for life at sea, in the air, in trees, underground or on two legs. The largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta, which enables the feeding of the fetus during gestation. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in) bumblebee bat to the 30-meter (98 ft) blue whale. With the exception of the five species of monotreme (egg-laying mammals), all modern mammals give birth to live young
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Millbrook, Bedfordshire
Millbrook is a small village and civil parish near Bedford, England. It has a population of 130,[2] increasing to 147 at the 2011 Census.[1] Millbrook railway station, on the Marston Vale Line is about two miles (3 km) from the village. The parish church, dedicated to St Michael and All Angels, is Grade II* listed.[3] The vale adjoining Millbrook is reputed to be the location that inspired the 'Slough of Despond' in John Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress. Millbrook is also home to the Millbrook Proving Ground and The Millbrook Golf Club. References[edit]^ a b "Civil Parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 10 November 2016.  ^ Office for National Statistics : Census 2001 : Parish Headcounts : Mid Bedfordshire Archived 26 May 2013 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 15 October 2010 ^ Historic England. "Church of St Michael  (Grade II*) (1113934)". National Heritage List for England
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Procaviidae
Hyraxes (from the Greek ὕραξ, hýrax, "shrewmouse"), also called dassies,[1] are small, thickset, herbivorous mammals in the order Hyracoidea. Hyraxes are well-furred, rotund animals with short tails. Typically, they measure between 30 and 70 cm (12 and 28 in) long and weigh between 2 and 5 kg (4.4 and 11 lb). They are superficially similar to pikas or rodents (especially marmots), but are more closely related to elephants and manatees. Four extant species are recognised; the rock hyrax (Procavia capensis), the yellow-spotted rock hyrax (Heterohyrax brucei), the western tree hyrax (Dendrohyrax dorsalis) and the southern tree hyrax (D. arboreus)
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Richard Lydekker
Richard Lydekker
Richard Lydekker
(25 July 1849 – 16 April 1915) was an English naturalist, geologist and writer of numerous books on natural history.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Biogeography 3 First cuckoo 4 Awards 5 Works 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksBiography[edit]Map showing Lydekker's line in relation to those of Wallace and Weber, as well as the probable extent of land at the time of the Last Glacial Maximum, when the sea level was more than 110 m lower than today. Richard Lydekker
Richard Lydekker
was born at Tavistock Square
Tavistock Square
in London. His father was Gerard Wolfe Lydekker, a barrister-at-law with Dutch ancestry
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Sir Andrew Clark, 1st Baronet
Sir Andrew Clark, 1st Baronet
Baronet
(28 October 1826 – 6 November 1893), was a Scottish physician and pathologist. He was born in Aberdeen, the illegitimate son of Amelia Anderson and Andrew Clark. His father, who also was a physician, died when he was only a few years old. After attending school in Aberdeen, he was sent by his guardians to Dundee, attending the High School of Dundee
Dundee
and was then apprenticed to a pharmacist. Upon returning to Aberdeen
Aberdeen
he began his medical studies in the University there. Soon, however, he went to Edinburgh, where in the extra-academical school he had a student's career of the most brilliant description, ultimately becoming assistant to Dr. John Hughes Bennett
John Hughes Bennett
in the Pathology Department of the Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Royal Infirmary and assistant demonstrator of anatomy to Robert Knox
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Subspecies
In biological classification, the term subspecies refers to a unity of populations of a species living in a subdivision of the species’s global range and varies from other populations of the same species by morphological characteristics.[2][3] A subspecies cannot be recognized independently. A species is either recognized as having no subspecies at all or at least two, including any that are extinct. The term is abbreviated "subsp." or "ssp."; plural: "subspecies". In zoology, under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, the subspecies is the only taxonomic rank below that of species that can receive a name. In botany and mycology, under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, other infraspecific ranks, such as variety, may be named
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Species
In biology, a species is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank, as well as a unit of biodiversity, but it has proven difficult to find a satisfactory definition. Scientists and conservationists need a species definition which allows them to work, regardless of the theoretical difficulties. If as Linnaeus
Linnaeus
thought, species were fixed, there would be no problem, but evolutionary processes cause species to change continually, and to grade into one another. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which two individuals can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction. While this definition is often adequate, when looked at more closely it is problematic. For example, with hybridisation, in a species complex of hundreds of similar microspecies, or in a ring species, the boundaries between closely related species become unclear
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William Henry Flower
Sir William Henry Flower
William Henry Flower
KCB FRCS FRS (30 November 1831 – 1 July 1899) was an English surgeon, museum curator and comparative anatomist, who became a leading authority on mammals and especially on the primate brain
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Zoologist
Zoology
Zoology
(/zuːˈɒlədʒi, zoʊˈɒlədʒi/) or animal biology is the branch of biology that studies the animal kingdom, including the structure, embryology, evolution, classification, habits, and distribution of all animals, both living and extinct, and how they interact with their ecosystems. The term is derived from Ancient
Ancient
Greek ζῷον, zōion, i.e. "animal" and λόγος, logos, i.e. "knowledge, study".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Ancient
Ancient
history to Darwin 1.2 Post-Darwin2 Research2.1 Structural 2.2 Physiological 2.3 Evolutionary 2.4 Classification 2.5 Ethology 2.6 Biogeography3 Branches of zoology 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Ancient
Ancient
history to Darwin[edit] Conrad Gesner
Conrad Gesner
(1516–1565)
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Fellow Of The Zoological Society Of London
The Zoological Society of London
Zoological Society of London
(ZSL) is a charity devoted to the worldwide conservation of animals and their habitats. It was founded in 1826.Contents1 History 2 The Institute of Zoology 3 Zoos and publications 4 Awards 5 Fellows 6 Honorary Fellows 7 Council 8 Presidents 9 Secretaries 10 Notes 11 External linksHistory[edit]Sir Joseph Banks’ house was the initial meeting place for the Zoological Society Zoological Society of London
Zoological Society of London
(ZSL), Main Building by John Belcher and John James Joass Zoological Society of London
Zoological Society of London
(ZSL), Main Building, EntranceOn 29 November 1822, the birthday of John Ray, “the father of modern zoology”, a meeting held in the Linnean Society
Linnean Society
in Soho Square led by Rev
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Mammalogy
In zoology, mammalogy is the study of mammals – a class of vertebrates with characteristics such as homeothermic metabolism, fur, four-chambered hearts, and complex nervous systems. Mammalogy
Mammalogy
has also been known as "mastology," "theriology," and "therology." There are about 4,200 different species of mammals. The major branches of mammalogy include natural history, taxonomy and systematics, anatomy and physiology, ethology, ecology, and management and control.[1] The approximate salary of a mammalogist varies from $20,000 to $60,000 a year, depending on their experience. Mammalogists are typically involved in activities such as conducting research, managing personnel, and writing proposals.[2] Mammalogy
Mammalogy
branches off into other taxonomically-oriented disciplines such as primatology (study of primates), and cetology (study of cetaceans)
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Zoology
Zoology
Zoology
(/zuːˈɒlədʒi, zoʊˈɒlədʒi/) or animal biology is the branch of biology that studies the animal kingdom, including the structure, embryology, evolution, classification, habits, and distribution of all animals, both living and extinct, and how they interact with their ecosystems. The term is derived from Ancient
Ancient
Greek ζῷον, zōion, i.e. "animal" and λόγος, logos, i.e. "knowledge, study".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Ancient
Ancient
history to Darwin 1.2 Post-Darwin2 Research2.1 Structural 2.2 Physiological 2.3 Evolutionary 2.4 Classification 2.5 Ethology 2.6 Biogeography3 Branches of zoology 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Ancient
Ancient
history to Darwin[edit] Conrad Gesner
Conrad Gesner
(1516–1565)
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Callicebus
Cheracebus Callicebus PlecturocebusThe titis, or titi monkeys, are the New World monkeys of the subfamily Callicebinae, which contains three extant genera, Cheracebus, Callicebus, and Plecturocebus.[2] This subfamily also contains the extinct genera Xenothrix, Antillothrix, Paralouatta, Carlocebus, Lagonimico, and possibly also Tremacebus. Titis live in South America, from Colombia to Brazil, Bolivia, Peru and northern Paraguay. Depending on species, titis have a head and body length of 23–46 centimetres (9.1–18.1 in), and a tail, which is longer than the head and body, of 26–56 centimetres (10–22 in).[3] The different titi species vary substantially in coloring, but resemble each other in most other physical ways
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Author Citation (zoology)
In zoological nomenclature, author citation refers to listing the person (or team) who first makes a scientific name of a taxon available. This is done in a scientific publication while fulfilling the formal requirements under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature,[1] hereinafter termed "the Code". According to the Code, "the name of the author does not form part of the name of a taxon and its citation is optional, although customary and often advisable" (Article 51.1), however Recommendation 51A suggests: "The original author and date of a name should be cited at least once in each work dealing with the taxon denoted by that name. This is especially important in distinguishing between homonyms and in identifying species-group names which are not in their original combinations". For the purpose of information retrieval, the author citation and year appended to the scientific name, e.g
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