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Olaus Magnus
Olaus Magnus
Olaus Magnus
(October 1490 – 1 August 1557) was a Swedish writer and Catholic ecclesiastic.Contents1 Biography 2 Name 3 Works 4 External links 5 ReferencesBiography[edit]Dwarfs fighting Cranes in GreenlandBorn in Skeninge in October 1490. Like his elder brother, Sweden's last Catholic archbishop Johannes Magnus, he obtained several ecclesiastical preferments. Among them a canonry at Uppsala
Uppsala
and Linköping, and the archdeaconry of Strängnäs. He was furthermore employed on various diplomatic services after his mission to Rome
Rome
in 1524, on behalf of Gustav I of Sweden
Sweden
(Vasa), to procure the appointment of Olaus Magnus' brother, Johannes Magnus
Johannes Magnus
as archbishop of Uppsala. He remained abroad dealing with foreign affairs and is known to have sent home a document that contained agreed trade-relations with the Netherlands
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Sigismund I The Old
Sigismund I of Poland
Poland
(Polish: Zygmunt I Stary, Lithuanian: Žygimantas I Senasis; 1 January 1467 – 1 April 1548), of the Jagiellon dynasty, reigned as King of Poland
King of Poland
and also as the Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1506 until 1548. Earlier, Sigismund had been invested as Duke of Silesia. A successful monarch and a great patron of arts, he established Polish suzerainty over Ducal Prussia (East Prussia) and incorporated the duchy of Mazovia into the Polish state, securing the nation's wealth, culture and power. Sigismund I, the fifth son of Casimir IV and Elisabeth of Habsburg, had ruled Głogów, Silesia, since 1499 and became margrave of Lusatia and governor of all Silesia in 1504. In a short time his judicial and administrative reforms transformed those territories into model states. He succeeded his brother Alexander I as grand prince of Lithuania and king of Poland
Poland
in 1506
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Folklore
Folklore
Folklore
is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as tales, proverbs and jokes. They include material culture, ranging from traditional building styles to handmade toys common to the group. Folklore
Folklore
also includes customary lore, the forms and rituals of celebrations such as Christmas
Christmas
and weddings, folk dances and initiation rites. Each one of these, either singly or in combination, is considered a folklore artifact. Just as essential as the form, folklore also encompasses the transmission of these artifacts from one region to another or from one generation to the next
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Council Of Trent
The Council of Trent
Council of Trent
(Latin: Concilium Tridentinum), held between 1545 and 1563 in Trent, or Trento, in northern Italy
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St. Lambert's Cathedral, Liège
St. Lambert's Cathedral, Liège (or in full, the Cathedral of Our Lady and St. Lambert; French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame-et-Saint-Lambert) was the cathedral of Liège, Belgium, until 1794, when its destruction began. This enormous Gothic cathedral, dedicated to Saint Lambert of Maastricht, occupied the site of the present Place Saint-Lambert in the centre of Liège.Contents1 History 2 Destruction 3 Notes 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] Saint Lambert, bishop of Maastricht, was assassinated in Liège about 705, and was initially buried in Maastricht. The site of his martyrdom became a place of pilgrimage, and his successor, Saint Hubert, returned the body and reburied it there. Shortly afterwards, the bishop's seat was transferred from Maastricht to Liège, and Lambert's shrine became a cathedral. Several structures succeeded each other on the site. The first was a martyr's shrine or mausoleum (martyrium), commissioned by Saint Hubert
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Liège (city)
Liège
Liège
(French: [ljɛʒ] ( listen) locally [li.eʃ]; Walloon: Lidje [liːtʃ]; Dutch: Luik, [lœyk] ( listen); German: Lüttich), is a major Walloon city and municipality and the capital of the Belgian province of Liège. The city is situated in the valley of the Meuse River, in the east of Belgium, not far from borders with the Netherlands
Netherlands
( Maastricht
Maastricht
is about 33 km (20.5 mi) to the north) and with Germany
Germany
(Aachen is about 53 km (32.9 mi) north-east). At Liège
Liège
the Meuse river meets the river Ourthe. The city is part of the sillon industriel, the former industrial backbone of Wallonia. It still is the principal economic and cultural centre of the region. The Liège
Liège
municipality (i.e
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Primate (bishop)
Primate (English: /ˈpraɪmət/) is a title or rank bestowed on some archbishops in certain Christian churches
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Poznań
Poznań
Poznań
(/ˈpoʊznæn, -nɑːn/ POHZ-na(h)n;[1] Polish: [ˈpɔznaɲ] ( listen); German: Posen; known also by other historical names) is a city on the Warta
Warta
River in west-central Poland, in the Greater Poland
Poland
region. It is best known for its renaissance Old Town and Ostrów Tumski Cathedral. Today, Poznań
Poznań
is an important cultural and business centre and one of Poland's most populous regions with many regional customs such as Saint John's Fair (Jarmark Świętojański), traditional Saint Martin's croissants and a local dialect. Poznań
Poznań
is among the oldest and largest cities in Poland
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Bridgettines
The Order of the Most Holy Savior (Latin: Ordo Sanctissimi Salvatoris), abbreviated as O.Ss.S., and informally known as the Brigittine or Bridgettine Order is a monastic religious order of Augustinian
Augustinian
nuns, Religious Sisters, and monks founded by Saint Bridget of Sweden
Bridget of Sweden
(Birgitta) in 1344,[1] and approved by Pope Urban V in 1370.[2] There are today several different branches of Bridgettines.Contents1 St Bridget's Rule 2 History 3 Currently active branches3.1 Medieval
Medieval
branch 3.2 Spanish branch 3.3 Swedish branch3.3.1 Controversy3.4 Brigittine monks 3.5 Anglican Brigittines4 See also 5 References 6 External linksSt Bridget's Rule[edit] The original Bridgettine Order was open to both men and women, and was dedicated to devotion to the Passion of Jesus
Passion of Jesus
Christ
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History
—George Santayana History
History
(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation")[2] is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.[3][4] Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events
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Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Scandinavia
Scandinavia[a] (/ˌskændɪˈneɪviə/ SKAN-dih-NAY-vee-ə) is a region in Northern Europe, characterized by common ethnocultural North Germanic heritage and mutually intelligible North Germanic languages.[2] The term Scandinavia
Scandinavia
in local usage covers the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, but in English usage, it also sometimes refers to the Scandinavian Peninsula
Scandinavian Peninsula
or to the broader region which includes Finland
Finland
and Iceland.[1] This broader region is usually known locally as the Nordic countries.[3] The remote Norwegian islands of Svalbard
Svalbard
and Jan Mayen
Jan Mayen
are usually not seen as a part of Scandinavia, nor is Greenland, a constituent country within the Kingdom of Denmark
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Munich
Munich
Munich
(/ˈmjuːnɪk/; German: München, pronounced [ˈmʏnçn̩] ( listen),[2] Austro-Bavarian: Minga [ˈmɪŋ(ː)ɐ]) is the capital and the most populated city in the German state of Bavaria, on the banks of the River Isar
Isar
north of the Bavarian Alps
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated by
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Catholic Encyclopedia
The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church,[1] also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia,[2] is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church. The first volume appeared in March 1907 and the last three volumes appeared in 1912, followed by a master index volume in 1914 and later supplementary volumes. It was designed "to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine".[3][4] The Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
was published by the Robert Appleton Company (RAC), a publishing company incorporated at New York in February 1905 for the express purpose of publishing the encyclopedia
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