HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Okinoerabu Island
Okinoerabujima
Okinoerabujima
(沖永良部島, Amami: っイェラブ Yyerabu; Kunigami: いラーブ Iraabu) is one of the Satsunan Islands, classed with the Amami archipelago between Kyūshū
Kyūshū
and Okinawa.[1] The island, 93.63  km² in area, has a population of approximately 15,000 persons. Administratively it is divided into the towns of Wadomari and China in Kagoshima Prefecture
[...More...]

"Okinoerabu Island" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
[...More...]

"Japanese Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Köppen Climate Classification
Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by Russian German climatologist Wladimir Köppen
Wladimir Köppen
in 1884,[2][3] with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936.[4][5] Later, German climatologist Rudolf Geiger (1954, 1961) collaborated with Köppen on changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the Köppen–Geiger climate classification system.[6][7] The Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
system has been further modified, within the Trewartha climate classification
Trewartha climate classification
system in the middle 1960s (revised in 1980)
[...More...]

"Köppen Climate Classification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sugar Cane
Sugarcane, or sugar cane, are several species of tall perennial true grasses of the genus Saccharum, tribe Andropogoneae, native to the warm temperate to tropical regions of South Asia
South Asia
and Melanesia, and used for sugar production. It has stout, jointed, fibrous stalks that are rich in the sugar sucrose, which accumulates in the stalk internodes. The plant is two to six meters (six to twenty feet) tall. All sugar cane species interbreed and the major commercial cultivars are complex hybrids[1]. Sugarcane
Sugarcane
belongs to the grass family Poaceae, an economically important seed plant family that includes maize, wheat, rice, and sorghum, and many forage crops. Sucrose, extracted and purified in specialized mill factories, is used as raw material in the food industry or is fermented to produce ethanol. Ethanol
Ethanol
is produced on a large scale by the Brazilian sugarcane industry
[...More...]

"Sugar Cane" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Daikansho
A daikansho (代官所) was the office of a magistrate (daikan) during the Edo period (18th & 19th century) of Japanese history. External links[e
[...More...]

"Daikansho" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Saigō Takamori
Saigō Takamori
Saigō Takamori
(Takanaga) (西郷 隆盛 (隆永), January 23, 1828 – September 24, 1877) was one of the most influential samurai in Japanese history and one of the three great nobles who led the Meiji Restoration. Living during the late Edo
Edo
and early Meiji periods, he has been dubbed the last true samurai.[1] He was born Saigō Kokichi (西郷 小吉), and received the given name Takamori in adulthood
[...More...]

"Saigō Takamori" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Meiji Restoration
The Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
(明治維新, Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Renovation, Revolution, Reform, or Renewal, was an event that restored practical imperial rule to the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
in 1868 under Emperor Meiji. Although there were ruling Emperors before the Meiji Restoration, the events restored practical abilities and consolidated the political system under the Emperor of Japan.[2] The goals of the restored government were expressed by the new Emperor in the Charter Oath
[...More...]

"Meiji Restoration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ōsumi Province
Ōsumi Province
Ōsumi Province
(大隅国, Ōsumi no Kuni) was an old province of Japan
Japan
in the area that is today the eastern part of Kagoshima Prefecture.[1] It was sometimes called Gūshū (隅州). Ōsumi bordered on Hyūga and Satsuma Provinces. Osumi's ancient capital was near modern Kokubu. During the Sengoku and Edo Periods, Ōsumi was controlled by the Shimazu clan
Shimazu clan
of neighboring Satsuma and did not develop a major administrative center. The Ōsumi region has developed its own distinct local dialect. Although Ōsumi is part of Kagoshima Prefecture
Kagoshima Prefecture
today, this dialect is different from that spoken in the city of Kagoshima
[...More...]

"Ōsumi Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
[...More...]

"United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Typhoon Babe (1977)
Typhoon Babe, also known as the Okinoerabu Typhoon (沖永良部台風, Okinoerabu Taifū),[1] was regarded as "the worst typhoon to threaten Japan in 18 years."[2] Developing as a tropical depression on September 2, Babe initially tracked west-northwestward as it intensified. On September 5, an abrupt shift in steering currents caused the system to turn north-northwestward. Early on September 6, the system intensified into a typhoon. Over the following two days, Babe quickly intensified, ultimately attaining its peak intensity early on September 8 with winds of 240 km/h (150 mph) and a barometric pressure of 905 mbar (hPa; 26.72 inHg). Not long after reaching this strength, another shift in the steering patterns caused the typhoon to execute a prolonged counter-clockwise arc, causing it to track through the Ryukyu Islands southwest of Japan, as it interacted with a low pressure originating from the Korean Peninsula
[...More...]

"Typhoon Babe (1977)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Humid Subtropical Climate
A humid subtropical climate is a zone of climate characterized by hot, humid summers and mild winters. These climates normally lie on the southeast side of all continents, generally between latitudes 25° and 35° and are located poleward from adjacent tropical climates, and south of temperate climates. While many subtropical climates tend to be on or near a coast, in some cases they extend inland, most notably in China
China
and the United States
United States
(US). The subtropical climate was created in the 1966 update of the Koppen climate classification. The Trewartha climate classification
Trewartha climate classification
sought to redefine middle latitude climates into smaller zones (the original Köppen system grouped all middle latitude climates into a single zone, which was the major criticism)
[...More...]

"Humid Subtropical Climate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Typhoon
A typhoon is a mature tropical cyclone that develops between 180° and 100°E in the Northern Hemisphere. This region is referred to as the Northwestern Pacific Basin,[1] and is the most active tropical cyclone basin on Earth, accounting for almost one-third of the world's annual tropical cyclones. For organizational purposes, the northern Pacific Ocean is divided into three regions: the eastern (North America to 140°W), central (140° to 180°W), and western (180° to 100°E). The Regional Specialized Meteorological Center
Regional Specialized Meteorological Center
(RSMC) for tropical cyclone forecasts is in Japan, with other tropical cyclone warning centers for the northwest Pacific in Hawaii
Hawaii
(the Joint Typhoon
Typhoon
Warning Center), the Philippines
Philippines
and Hong Kong
[...More...]

"Typhoon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Amami Ōshima Language
The Amami language or languages (島口, シマユムタ, Shimayumuta), also known as Amami Ōshima
Amami Ōshima
or simply Ōshima ('Big Island'), is a Ryukyuan language
Ryukyuan language
spoken in the Amami Islands
Amami Islands
south of Kyūshū
[...More...]

"Amami Ōshima Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Precipitation
In meteorology, precipitation is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravity.[2] The main forms of precipitation include drizzle, rain, sleet, snow, graupel and hail. Precipitation
Precipitation
occurs when a portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor, so that the water condenses and "precipitates". Thus, fog and mist are not precipitation but suspensions, because the water vapor does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Precipitation
Precipitation
forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud
[...More...]

"Precipitation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Relative Humidity
Relative humidity
Relative humidity
(RH) is the ratio of the partial pressure of water vapor to the equilibrium vapor pressure of water at a given temperature. Relative humidity
Relative humidity
depends on temperature and the pressure of the system of interest
[...More...]

"Relative Humidity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.