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Oamaru
Oamaru
Oamaru
(/ɒməˈruː/ ( listen); Māori: Te Oha-a-Maru) is the largest town in North Otago, in the South Island
South Island
of New Zealand, it is the main town in the Waitaki District. It is 80 kilometres (50 mi) south of Timaru
Timaru
and 120 kilometres (75 mi) north of Dunedin
Dunedin
on the Pacific coast; State Highway 1 and the railway Main South Line connect it to both cities. With a population of 13,900,[2] Oamaru
Oamaru
is the 28th largest urban area in New Zealand, and the third largest in Otago
Otago
behind Dunedin
Dunedin
and Queenstown. The name Oamaru
Oamaru
derives from the Māori and can be translated as "the place of Maru" (cf. Timaru)
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Māori Language
Māori (/ˈmaʊri/; Māori pronunciation: [ˈmaːɔɾi]  listen), also known as Te Reo ("the language"), is an Eastern Polynesian language spoken by the Māori people, the indigenous population of New Zealand. Since 1987, it has been one of New Zealand's official languages. It is closely related to Cook Islands
Cook Islands
Māori, Tuamotuan, and Tahitian
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Sealers' War
The Sealers' War, also known as the "War of the Shirt", was a conflict in southern New Zealand
New Zealand
that started in 1810. It began following the theft, by Māori chief, of a red shirt, a knife, and several other items from the sealing vessel Sydney Cove in Otago Harbour. The war gave rise to the view, among some Europeans, that the Māori were treacherous by nature.[1] The true cause was revealed by the discovery of the Creed manuscript in 2003, which records the views of Māori who were alive at the time of the events.[2]Contents1 The initial incident 2 Escalation 3 Effect on sealing 4 Bibliography 5 ReferencesThe initial incident[edit] Late in 1810, Sydney Cove, an English sealing vessel, was anchored in Otago Harbour
Otago Harbour
while its crew were working at Cape Saunders
Cape Saunders
on the Otago Peninsula. Māori were in the habit of visiting such vessels to trade for pork and potatoes
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HM Bark Endeavour
Endeavour or endeavor may refer to:Contents1 Arts, entertainment 2 Awards 3 Computing and technology 4 Education 5 Man-made structures 6 Media 7 Motor vehicles 8 Organizations 9 Places 10 Transport10.1 Ships 10.2 Space vehicles 10.3 Trains11 Other 12 See alsoArts, entertainment[edit]Endeavor, a strategy game from Z-Man Games Endeavors, a rock band from Montreal, Canada Endeavour Entertainment, a home media company responsible for releasing Thomas & Friends videos in New Zealand Endeavour Morse, central character of the Inspector Morse novels by Colin Dexter Endeavour (TV series), a television drama adapted from characters in Colin Dexter's novels Endeavour, a spacecraft from Rendezvous with Rama
Rendezvous with Rama
by Arthur C. Clarke Endeavour, an Alliance Strike carrier from Starlancer H.M.S
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James Cook
Captain James Cook
James Cook
FRS (7 November 1728[NB 1] – 14 February 1779) was a British explorer, navigator, cartographer, and captain in the Royal Navy. Cook made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean, during which he achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia
Australia
and the Hawaiian Islands, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand. Cook joined the British merchant navy as a teenager and joined the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in 1755. He saw action in the Seven Years' War, and subsequently surveyed and mapped much of the entrance to the Saint Lawrence River during the siege of Quebec. This helped bring Cook to the attention of the Admiralty
Admiralty
and Royal Society
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Banks Peninsula
Banks Peninsula
Peninsula
is a peninsula of volcanic origin on the east coast of the South Island
South Island
of New Zealand. It has an area of approximately 1,150 square kilometres (440 sq mi) and encompasses two large harbours and many smaller bays and coves. The South Island's largest city, Christchurch, is immediately north of the peninsula.Contents1 History 2 Geology 3 Land use 4 Tourism 5 Statistics 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit]This section may require cleanup to meet's quality standards. The specific problem is: unprofessional Please help improve this section if you can. (April 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Three successive phases of Māori settlement took place on the peninsula, which is still known to Māori as Te Pataka o Rakaihautu (The Storehouse of Rakaihautu)
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Te Rauparaha
Te Rauparaha
Te Rauparaha
(1760s – 27 November 1849)[1] was a Māori rangatira (chief) and war leader of the Ngāti Toa
Ngāti Toa
tribe who took a leading part in the Musket Wars. He was influential in the original sale of land to the New Zealand Company
New Zealand Company
and was a participant in the Wairau Affray
Wairau Affray
in Marlborough.Contents1 Early days 2 Migration 3 Trade and further conquest 4 European settlement 5 Capture and eventual death 6 Haka 7 References 8 External linksEarly days[edit] From 1807, muskets became the weapon of choice and partly changed the character of tribal warfare
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Sweet Potato
The sweet potato ( Ipomoea
Ipomoea
batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the bindweed or morning glory family, Convolvulaceae. Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable.[1][2] The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales. The plant is a herbaceous perennial vine, bearing alternate heart-shaped or palmately lobed leaves and medium-sized sympetalous flowers. The edible tuberous root is long and tapered, with a smooth skin whose color ranges between yellow, orange, red, brown, purple, and beige. Its flesh ranges from beige through white, red, pink, violet, yellow, orange, and purple
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Hawaiki
In Polynesian mythology, Hawaiki
Hawaiki
(also rendered as "Avaiki" (Society Islands), "Savai'i", (Samoa), "Havai’i" (Reo Tahiti)) is the original home of the Polynesian peoples, before dispersal across Polynesia.[1] It also features as the underworld in many Māori stories. Anne Salmond states Havai'i is the old name for Raiatea, the homeland of the Māori. When James Cook
James Cook
first sighted New Zealand in 1769, he had Tupaia on board, a Raiatean navigator and linguist. Cook's arrival seemed to be a confirmation of a prophecy by Toiroa, a priest from Mahia. At Tolaga Bay, Tupaia conversed with the priest, tohunga, associated with the school of learning located there, called Te Rawheoro
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Polynesia
Coordinates: 16°51′11″S 148°24′19″E / 16.8529613°S 148.4052203°E / -16.8529613; 148.4052203 Polynesia
Polynesia
is generally defined as the islands within the Polynesian triangleThe three major cultural areas in the Pacific Ocean: Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia Polynesia
Polynesia
(UK: /ˌpɒlɪˈniːziə/; US: /ˌpɑːləˈniːʒə/, from Greek: πολύς polys "many" and Greek: νῆσος nēsos "island") is a subregion of Oceania, made up of more than 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean
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Pa (Māori)
The word pā (IPA paː) can refer to any Māori village or defensive settlement, but often refers to hill forts – fortified settlements with palisades and defensive terraces – and also to fortified villages.
are mainly in the North Island
North Island
of New Zealand, north of Lake Taupo. Over 5000 sites have been located, photographed and examined although few have been subject to detailed analysis. No pā have been yet located from the early colonization period when early Polynesian-Māori colonizers lived in the lower South Island. Variations similar to pā are found throughout central Polynesia, in the islands of Fiji, Tonga
Tonga
and the Marquesas Islands. In Māori culture, a great pā represented the mana (prestige or power) and strategic ability of an iwi (tribe or tribal confederacy), as personified by a rangatira (chieftain)
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Māori Culture
Māori culture
Māori culture
is the culture of the Māori of New Zealand
New Zealand
(an Eastern Polynesian people) and forms a distinctive part of New Zealand culture. Within the Māori community, and to a lesser extent throughout New Zealand as a whole, the word Māoritanga is often used as an approximate synonym for Māori culture, the Māori suffix -tanga being roughly equivalent to the qualitative noun ending "-ness" in English.[1][2] There have been three distinct but overlapping cultural eras—before widespread European contact, the 1800s in which Māori began interacting with European visitors and settlers, and the modern era since the beginning of the 20th century
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Kaiapoi
Kaiapoi
Kaiapoi
is a town in the Waimakariri District
Waimakariri District
of the Canterbury region, in the South Island
South Island
of New Zealand. The town is located approximately 17 kilometres north of central Christchurch, close to the mouth of the Waimakariri River. It is considered to be a satellite town of Christchurch, although in the Waimakariri for statistical purposes it is part of the Christchurch
Christchurch
urban area. In the 2006 census, the population of the town was 10,200, with a further 1,700 residents in the surrounding area
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Christchurch
Christchurch
Christchurch
(/ˈkraɪstʃɜːrtʃ/; Māori: Ōtautahi) is the largest city in the South Island
South Island
of New Zealand
New Zealand
and the seat of the Canterbury Region. The Christchurch
Christchurch
urban area lies on the South Island's east coast, just north of Banks Peninsula. It is home to 396,700 residents,[2] making it New Zealand's third most-populous city behind Auckland
Auckland
and Wellington. The Avon River flows through the centre of the city, with an urban park located along its banks
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Pacific Ocean
The Pacific Ocean
Ocean
is the largest and deepest of Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic Ocean
Arctic Ocean
in the north to the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
(or, depending on definition, to Antarctica) in the south and is bounded by Asia
Asia
and Australia
Australia
in the west and the Americas
Americas
in the east. At 165,250,000 square kilometers (63,800,000 square miles) in area (as defined with an Antarctic
Antarctic
southern border), this largest division of the World Ocean—and, in turn, the hydrosphere—covers about 46% of Earth's water surface and about one-third of its total surface area, making it larger than all of Earth's land area combined.[1] Both the center of the Water Hemisphere and the Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
are in the Pacific Ocean
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