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Oamaru
OAMARU (/ɒməˈruː/ ( listen );) or TE OHA-A-MARU (Māori ) is the largest town in North Otago
Otago
, in the South Island
South Island
of New Zealand, it is the main town in the Waitaki District . It is 80 kilometres south of Timaru
Timaru
and 120 kilometres north of Dunedin
Dunedin
, on the Pacific coast, and State Highway 1 and the railway Main South Line
Main South Line
connect it to both. With a population of 13,850, Oamaru
Oamaru
is the 28th largest urban area in New Zealand, and the third largest in Otago
Otago
behind Dunedin
Dunedin
and Queenstown. The name Oamaru
Oamaru
derives from Māori words meaning the place of Maru (compare with Timaru). The identity of Maru remains open to conjecture
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HM Bark Endeavour
Coordinates : 41°36′N 71°21′W / 41.600°N 71.350°W / 41.600; -71.350 (Narragansett Bay) HMS Endeavour off the coast of New Holland, by Samuel Atkins c. 1794 HISTORY GREAT BRITAIN Name: Endeavour Operator: Royal Navy Builder: Thomas Fishburn, Whitby Launched: June 1764 Acquired: 28 March 1768 as Earl of Pembroke Commissioned: 26 May 1768 Decommissioned: September 1774 Out of service: March 1775, sold Renamed: Lord Sandwich, February 1776 Homeport: Plymouth , United Kingdom Fate: Scuttled, Newport, Rhode Island , 1778 GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS Class and type: Bark Tons burthen: 366  49⁄94 (bm ) Length: 97 ft 8 in (29.77 m) Beam: 29 ft 2 in (8.89 m) Depth of hold: 11 ft 4 in (3.45 m) Sail plan: * Full rigged ship * 3,321 square yards (2,777 m2) of sail Speed: 7 to 8 k
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Seal Hunting
SEAL HUNTING, or SEALING, is the personal or commercial hunting of seals . Seal hunting
Seal hunting
is currently practiced in eight countries and one region of Denmark: Canada, the United States, Namibia, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Finland, Sweden, and Greenland. Most of the world's seal hunting takes place in Canada and Greenland. Canada's largest market for seals is Norway. The Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) regulates the seal hunt in Canada. It sets quotas (total allowable catch – TAC), monitors the hunt, studies the seal population, works with the Canadian Sealers' Association to train sealers on new regulations, and promotes sealing through its website and spokespeople. The DFO set harvest quotas of over 90,000 seals in 2007; 275,000 in 2008; 280,000 in 2009; and 330,000 in 2010. The actual kills in recent years have been less than the quotas: 82,800 in 2007; 217,800 in 2008; 72,400 in 2009; and 67,000 in 2010
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Sealers' War
The SEALERS\' WAR, also known as the "War of the Shirt", was a conflict in southern New Zealand
New Zealand
that started in 1810. It began following the theft, by Māori chief, of a red shirt, a knife, and several other items from the sealing vessel Sydney Cove in Otago Harbour . The war gave rise to the view, among some Europeans, that the Māori were treacherous by nature. The true cause was revealed by the discovery of the Creed manuscript in 2003, which records the views of Māori who were alive at the time of the events. CONTENTS * 1 The initial incident * 2 Escalation * 3 Effect on sealing * 4 Bibliography * 5 References THE INITIAL INCIDENTLate in 1810, Sydney Cove, an English sealing vessel , was anchored in Otago Harbour while its crew were working at Cape Saunders on the Otago Peninsula . Māori were in the habit of visiting such vessels to trade for pork and potatoes
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James Cook
Captain JAMES COOK FRS (7 November 1728 – 14 February 1779) was a British explorer, navigator, cartographer, and captain in the Royal Navy . Cook made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean, during which he achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia
Australia
and the Hawaiian Islands
Hawaiian Islands
, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand . Cook joined the British merchant navy as a teenager and joined the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in 1755. He saw action in the Seven Years\' War , and subsequently surveyed and mapped much of the entrance to the Saint Lawrence River during the siege of Quebec . This helped bring Cook to the attention of the Admiralty
Admiralty
and Royal Society
Royal Society

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Banks Peninsula
BANKS PENINSULA is a peninsula of volcanic origin on the east coast of the South Island
South Island
of New Zealand
New Zealand
. It has an area of approximately 1,150 square kilometres (440 sq mi) and encompasses two large harbours and many smaller bays and coves. The South Island's largest city, Christchurch
Christchurch
, is immediately north of the peninsula. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Geology * 3 Land use * 4 Tourism * 5 Statistics * 6 References * 7 Further reading * 8 External links HISTORY This section may REQUIRE CLEANUP to meet's quality standards . The specific problem is: UNPROFESSIONAL Please help improve this section if you can. (April 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message )Three successive phases of Māori settlement took place on the peninsula, which is still known to Māori as Te Pataka o Rakaihautu (The Storehouse of Rakaihautu)
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Polynesia
POLYNESIA (UK : /ˌpɒlᵻˈniːziə/ ; US : /ˌpɑːləˈniːʒə/ , from Greek : πολύς "poly" many + Greek : νῆσος "nēsos" island) is a subregion of Oceania , made up of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean . The indigenous people who inhabit the islands of Polynesia are termed Polynesians . They share many similar traits including the language family , culture , and beliefs. Historically, they were experienced sailors who used stars to navigate at night. The term Polynesia was first used in 1756 by French writer Charles de Brosses , and originally applied to all the islands of the Pacific . In 1831, Jules Dumont d\'Urville proposed a restriction on its use during a lecture to the Geographical Society of Paris. Historically, these islands have also been referred to as the SOUTH SEA ISLANDS
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Māori Language
MāORI (/ˈmaʊəri/ ; Māori pronunciation: listen ), also known as TE REO ("the language"), is an Eastern Polynesian language spoken by the Māori people , the indigenous population of New Zealand. Since 1987, it has been one of New Zealand's official languages . It is closely related to Cook Islands Māori , Tuamotuan , and Tahitian . According to a 2001 survey on the health of the Māori language, the number of very fluent adult speakers was about 9% of the Māori population, or 30,000 adults. A national census undertaken in 2006 says that about 4% of the New Zealand
New Zealand
population, or 23.7% of the Māori population, could hold a conversation in Māori about everyday things. There was originally no native writing system for Māori. Missionaries brought the Latin alphabet around 1814, and linguist Samuel Lee worked with chief Hongi Hika to systematize the written language in 1820
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Sweet Potato
The SWEET POTATO ( Ipomoea batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the family Convolvulaceae . Its large, starchy , sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable . The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens . The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae , but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales . The plant is a herbaceous perennial vine , bearing alternate heart-shaped or palmately lobed leaves and medium-sized sympetalous flowers . The edible tuberous root is long and tapered, with a smooth skin whose color ranges between yellow, orange, red, brown, purple, and beige. Its flesh ranges from beige through white, red, pink, violet, yellow, orange, and purple
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Te Rauparaha
TE RAUPARAHA (1760s – 27 November 1849) was a Māori rangatira (chief) and war leader of the Ngāti Toa tribe who took a leading part in the Musket Wars . He was influential in the original sale of land to the New Zealand Company and was a participant in the Wairau Affray in Marlborough. CONTENTS * 1 Early days * 2 Migration * 3 Trade and further conquest * 4 European settlement * 5 Capture and eventual death * 6 Haka * 7 References * 8 External links EARLY DAYSFrom 1807, muskets became the weapon of choice and partly changed the character of tribal warfare. In 1819 Te Rauparaha
Te Rauparaha
joined with a large war party of Ngāpuhi led by Tāmati Wāka Nene ; they probably reached Cook Strait before turning back
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Pa (Māori)
The word
(IPA paː) can refer to any Māori village or defensive settlement, but often refers to hill forts – fortified settlements with palisades and defensive terraces – and also to fortified villages.
are mainly in the North Island
North Island
of New Zealand, north of Lake Taupo
Lake Taupo
. Over 5000 sites have been located, photographed and examined although few have been subject to detailed analysis. No pā have been yet located from the early colonization period when early Polynesian-Māori colonizers lived in the lower South Island. Variations similar to pā are found throughout central Polynesia
Polynesia
, in the islands of Fiji
Fiji
, Tonga
Tonga
and the Marquesas Islands
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Sheep Station
A SHEEP STATION is a large property (station , the equivalent of a ranch ) in Australia
Australia
or New Zealand
New Zealand
whose main activity is the raising of sheep for their wool and meat . In Australia, sheep stations are usually in the south-east or south-west of the country. In New Zealand the Merinos are usually in the high country of the South Island
South Island
. These properties may be thousands of square kilometres in size and run low stocking rates to be able to sustainably provide enough feed and water for the stock. Sheep stations and sheep husbandry began in Australia
Australia
when the British started raising sheep in 1788 at Sydney Cove . In Australia, the owner of a sheep station can be called a pastoralist, grazier; or formerly, a squatter , as in Waltzing Matilda
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Long Depression
The LONG DEPRESSION was a worldwide price and economic recession , beginning in 1873 and running either through the spring of 1879, or 1896, depending on the metrics used. It was the most severe in Europe and the United States
United States
, which had been experiencing strong economic growth fueled by the Second Industrial Revolution
Second Industrial Revolution
in the decade following the American Civil War
American Civil War
. The episode was labeled the "Great Depression" at the time, and it held that designation until the Great Depression of the 1930s. Though a period of general deflation and a general contraction , it did not have the severe economic retrogression of the Great Depression
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Water Engine
The WATER ENGINE is a positive-displacement engine, often closely resembling a steam engine with similar pistons and valves, that is driven by water pressure . The supply of water was derived from a natural head of water , the water mains , or a specialised high-pressure water supply such as that provided by the London Hydraulic Power Company . Water mains in the 19th century often operated at pressures of 30 to 40 psi , while hydraulic power companies supplied higher pressure water at anything up to 800 psi. The term WATER MOTOR (German : Wassermotor) was more commonly applied to small Pelton wheel type turbines driven from a mains water tap (e.g. Whitney Water Motor ), and mainly used for light loads, for example sewing machines
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Waikouaiti
WAIKOUAITI is a small town in East Otago , New Zealand, within the city limits of Dunedin
Dunedin
. The town is close to the coast and the mouth of the Waikouaiti River . Today, Waikouaiti
Waikouaiti
is a retail trade and servicing centre for the surrounding district, which has sheep farming as the principal primary activity. A major egg producer, Zeagold Foods, a branch of Mainland Poultry LTD has a 500,000-hen factory farming operation here and is in the process of expanding over the next year to meet demand for egg products. Hawksbury , 3 km southwest of Waikouaiti, has a cheese factory and shop , a swimming pool and housing developed from the old mental health institution, Cherry Farm . Karitane , 3 km to the southeast has a small fishing port
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New London, Connecticut
Michael E. Passero City Council * Don Venditto, Jr. * Efrain Dominguez, Jr. * Martha E. Marx * Erica L. Richardson * John D. Satti * Michael J. Tranchida AREA • CITY 10.76 sq mi (27.9 km2) • LAND 5.54 sq mi (14.3 km2) • WATER 5.23 sq mi (13.5 km2) • URBAN 123.03 sq mi (318.66 km2) ELEVATION 56 ft (17 m) POPULATION (2010 ) • CITY 27,620 • ESTIMATE (2016) 26,984 • DENSITY 4,720/sq mi (1,824/km2) • METRO 274,055 TIME ZONE EST ( UTC-5
UTC-5
) • SUMMER (DST ) EDT ( UTC-4
UTC-4
) ZIP CODE 06320 AREA CODE(S) 860 FIPS CODE 09-52280 GNIS FEATURE ID 0209237 WEBSITE City of New LondonNEW LONDON is a seaport city and a port of entry on the northeast coast of the United States. It is located at the mouth of the Thames River in New London County , Southeastern Connecticut
Connecticut

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