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Nydam Mose
Nydam Mose
Nydam Mose
("Nydam Bog") is an archaeological site located at Øster Sottrup, a town located in Sundeved, eight kilometres from Sønderborg, Denmark.Contents1 History 2 Excavation2.1 First excavation 2.2 Second excavation3 Nydam boat 4 Nydam Society 5 Panorama 6 See also 7 External linksHistory[edit] In the Iron Age, the site of the bog was a sacred place, where the weapons and ships of vanquished armies were offered to the indigenous gods in thanks for victory over the fallen enemy. Many items were deliberately destroyed (bent, broken or hacked into pieces) in ritual sacrificial acts, from the period 200 to 400 AD. Nydam Bog has played a role in the Danish national claim for Southern Jutland.[citation needed] The first known finds from the bog date from the 1830s, when a local farmer gave old swords and shields as toys to his children. Amongst numerous other items, three boats were found in Nydam Bog
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Sundeved
Sundeved is a peninsula on the east coast of the Jutland peninsula in south Denmark. It lies between Åbenrå Fjord and Als Fjord to the north, Alssund to the east and Flensborg Fjord to the south. The westernmost part of the city of Sønderborg is located on the peninsula. Most of Sønderborg is on the island of Als. Until January 1, 2007 Sundeved (German: Sundewitt) was also the name of a municipality in the former South Jutland County The municipality covered an area of 69 km², and had a total population of 5,298 (2005). Its last mayor was John Solkær Pedersen. The main town and the site of its municipal council was the town of Sønderborg, in neighboring Sønderborg municipality
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Sønderborg
Sønderborg
Sønderborg
(Danish pronunciation: [ˈsønɐˌbɒːˀ] - (German:  Sonderburg (help·info)) is a Danish town of Region of Southern Denmark. It is the main town and the administrative seat of Sønderborg Municipality
Sønderborg Municipality
(Kommune). The town has a population of 27,434 (1 January 2014),[1] in a municipality of 75,264.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Education 4 Geography 5 Economy 6 Transportation 7 Notable natives7.1 Arts & Science 7.2 Public ideas 7.3 Business 7.4 Sport8 Panoramic view 9 Culture9.1 Musical Institutions 9.2 Attractions10 References 11 External linksOverview[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Ship Burial
A ship burial or boat grave is a burial in which a ship or boat is used either as a container for the dead and the grave goods, or as a part of the grave goods itself. If the ship is very small, it is called a boat grave. This style of burial was used among the Germanic peoples, particularly by Viking Age
Viking Age
Norsemen
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Clinker Built
Clinker built (also known as lapstrake)[1] is a method of boat building where the edges of hull planks overlap, called a "land" or "landing." In craft of any size shorter planks can be joined end to end into a longer strake or hull plank. The technique developed in northern Europe and was successfully used by the Anglo-Saxons, Frisians, Scandinavians, and typical for the Hanseatic cog
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Dendrochronology
Dendrochronology
Dendrochronology
(or tree-ring dating) is the scientific method of dating tree rings (also called growth rings) to the exact year they were formed in order to analyze atmospheric conditions during different periods in history. Dendrochronology
Dendrochronology
is useful for determining the timing of events and rates of change in the environment (most prominently climate) and also in works of art and architecture, such as old panel paintings on wood, buildings, etc. It is also used in radiocarbon dating to calibrate radiocarbon ages.[1] New growth in trees occurs in a layer of cells near the bark. A tree's growth rate changes in a predictable pattern throughout the year in response to seasonal climate changes, resulting in visible growth rings
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Gottorf Castle
Gottorf Castle
Castle
(German: Schloss Gottorf, Danish: Gottorp Slot, Low German: Gottorp) is a castle and estate in the city of Schleswig, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. It is the ancestral home of the Holstein-Gottorp
Holstein-Gottorp
branch of the House of Oldenburg. It is situated on an island in the Schlei, about 40 km from the Baltic Sea. History[edit]Gottorf castle in 1864It was first settled as an estate in 1161 as the residence of Bishop Occo of Schleswig when his former residence was destroyed. The Danish Duke of Schleswig
Schleswig
acquired it through a purchase in 1268, and in 1340 it was transferred to the Count of Holstein
Holstein
at Rendsburg
Rendsburg
of the House of Schauenburg
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National Museum Of Denmark
The National Museum of Denmark
Denmark
(Nationalmuseet) in Copenhagen
Copenhagen
is Denmark’s largest museum of cultural history, comprising the histories of Danish and foreign cultures, alike. The museum's main building is located a short distance from Strøget
Strøget
at the center of Copenhagen. It contains exhibits from around the world, from Greenland to South America
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Second Schleswig War
 German Confederation Prussia  Austrian Empire DenmarkCommanders and leaders William I Otto von Bismarck Helmuth von Moltke Friedrich Graf von Wrangel Franz Joseph I Wilhelm von Tegetthoff Christian IX Ditlev Gothard Monrad Christian Albrecht Bluhme Christian Julius de Meza George Daniel GerlachStrengthAt the outbreak of war: 61,000 158 guns Later reinforcements: 20,000 64 guns[1] 38,000 100+ guns[1]Casualties and losses1,700+ killed, wounded, or captured 1,570+ killed, 700+ wounded, 3,550+ capturedv t eSecond Schleswig
Schleswig
WarMysunde Danevirke Sankelmark Jasmund Dybbøl Fredericia Heligoland Als LundbyThe Second Schleswig
Schleswig
War (Danish: 2. Slesvigske Krig, German: Deutsch-Dänischer Krieg) was the second military conflict over the Schleswig- Holstein
Holstein
Question of the nineteenth century
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Shield
A shield is a piece of personal armour held in the hand or mounted on the wrist or forearm. Shields are used to intercept specific attacks, whether from close-ranged weaponry or projectiles such as arrows, by means of active blocks, instead of providing passive protection. Shields vary greatly in size, ranging from large panels that protect the user's whole body to small models (such as the buckler) that were intended for hand-to-hand-combat use. Shields also vary a great deal in thickness; whereas some shields were made of relatively deep, absorbent, wooden planking to protect soldiers from the impact of spears and crossbow bolts, others were thinner and lighter and designed mainly for deflecting blade strikes
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Arrow
An arrow is a fin-stabilized projectile that is shot with a bow, and usually consists of a long straight shaft with a weighty and usually pointed arrowhead attached to the front end, with fletchings and a nock at the rear end. The use of bows and arrows by humans predates recorded history and is common to most cultures. One who makes arrows is a fletcher.[1]Contents1 History 2 Size2.1 Shaft2.1.1 GPI rating 2.1.2 Footed arrows2.2 Arrowhead 2.3 Fletchings 2.4 Nocks3 Finishes and Cresting 4 See also 5 Symbolism 6 Notes 7 External linksHistory[edit] Main article: History of archery The oldest evidence of stone-tipped projectiles, which may or may not have been propelled by a bow (c.f. atlatl), dating to c. 64,000 years ago, were found in Sibudu Cave, current South Africa.[2] The oldest evidence of the use of bows to shoot arrows dates to about 10,000 years ago; it is based on pinewood arrows found in the Ahrensburg valley north of Hamburg
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Bow (weapon)
The bow and arrow is a ranged weapon system consisting of an elastic launching device (bow) and long-shafted projectiles (arrows). Archery
Archery
is the art, practice or skill of using bows to shoot arrows.[1] A person who shoots arrows with a bow is called a bowman or an archer. Someone who makes bows is known as a bowyer,[2] one who makes arrows is a fletcher,[3] and one who manufactures metal arrowheads is an arrowsmith.[4] The use of bow and arrows by humans for hunting practices predates recorded history and were common to most prehistoric cultures
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Spear
A spear is a pole weapon consisting of a shaft, usually of wood, with a pointed head. The head may be simply the sharpened end of the shaft itself, as is the case with fire hardened spears, or it may be made of a more durable material fastened to the shaft, such as flint, obsidian, iron, steel or bronze. The most common design for hunting or combat spears since ancient times has incorporated a metal spearhead shaped like a triangle, lozenge, or leaf. The heads of fishing spears usually feature barbs or serrated edges. The word spear comes from the Old English spere, from the Proto-Germanic speri, from a Proto-Indo-European root *sper- "spear, pole". Spears can be divided into two broad categories: those designed for thrusting in melee combat and those designed for throwing (usually referred to as javelins). The spear has been used throughout human history both as a hunting and fishing tool and as a weapon
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Lance
The lance is a pole weapon or spear designed to be used by a mounted warrior or cavalry soldier (lancer). During the periods of classical and medieval warfare, it evolved into being the leading weapon in cavalry charges, and was unsuited for throwing or for repeated thrusting, unlike similar weapons of the spear/javelin/pike family typically used by infantry. Lances were often equipped with a vamplate – a small circular plate to prevent the hand sliding up the shaft upon impact. Though best known as a military and sporting weapon carried by European knights, the use of lances was widespread throughout Asia, the Middle East and North Africa wherever suitable mounts were available
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