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Nursing
Nursing
Nursing
is a profession within the health care sector focused on the care of individuals, families, and communities so they may attain, maintain, or recover optimal health and quality of life. Nurses may be differentiated from other health care providers by their approach to patient care, training, and scope of practice. Nurses practice in many specialties with differing levels of prescription authority. Many nurses provide care within the ordering scope of physicians, and this traditional role has shaped the public image of nurses as care providers. However, nurse practitioners are permitted by most jurisdictions to practice independently in a variety of settings
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Sisters Of Charity
Many religious communities have the term Sisters of Charity
Sisters of Charity
in their name. Some Sisters of Charity
Sisters of Charity
communities refer to the Vincentian tradition, or in America to the tradition of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, but others are unrelated. The rule of Vincent de Paul
Vincent de Paul
for the Daughters of Charity has been adopted and adapted by at least sixty founders of religious institutes for sisters around the world.Contents1 History 2 Paris, France 3 Irish Sisters 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]In 1633 Vincent de Paul, a French priest and Louise de Marillac, a widow, established the Company of the Daughters of Charity as a group of women dedicated to serving the "poorest of the poor". They set up soup kitchens, organized community hospitals, established schools and homes for orphaned children, offered job training, taught the young to read and write, and improved prison conditions
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Statistics
Statistics
Statistics
is a branch of mathematics dealing with the collection, analysis, interpretation, presentation, and organization of data.[1][2] In applying statistics to, for example, a scientific, industrial, or social problem, it is conventional to begin with a statistical population or a statistical model process to be studied. Populations can be diverse topics such as "all people living in a country" or "every atom composing a crystal". Statistics
Statistics
deals with all aspects of data including the planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiments.[1] See glossary of probability and statistics. When census data cannot be collected, statisticians collect data by developing specific experiment designs and survey samples. Representative sampling assures that inferences and conclusions can reasonably extend from the sample to the population as a whole
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Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Buddhist
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Epistle To The Romans
The Epistle
Epistle
to the Romans or Letter to the Romans, often shortened to Romans, is the sixth book in the New Testament. Biblical scholars agree that it was composed by the Apostle Paul
Apostle Paul
to explain that salvation is offered through the gospel of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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EThOS
Ethos
Ethos
(/ˈiːθɒs/ or US: /ˈiːθoʊs/) is a Greek word meaning "character" that is used to describe the guiding beliefs or ideals that characterize a community, nation, or ideology. The Greeks also used this word to refer to the power of music to influence emotions, behaviours, and even morals.[1] Early Greek stories of Orpheus
Orpheus
exhibit this idea in a compelling way
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Reformation
The Reformation, or, more fully, the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation, was a schism in Western Christianity
Christianity
initiated by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and continued by John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
and other Protestant Reformers
Protestant Reformers
in 16th-century Europe. It is usually considered to have started with the publication of the Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
in 1517 and lasted until the end of the Thirty Years' War in 1648. Although there had been earlier attempts to reform the Catholic Church – such as those of Jan Hus, Peter Waldo, John Wycliffe, and Girolamo Savonarola – Luther is widely acknowledged to have started the Reformation
Reformation
with the Ninety-five Theses
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Protestant
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It originated with the Reformation,[b] a movement against what its followers con
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Crimean War
223,513  Ottoman Empire 45,400[2] 10,100 killed in action 10,800 died of wounds 24,500 died of disease French Empire 135,485[2] 8,490 killed in action; 11,750 died of wounds; 75,375 died of disease 39,870 wounded  British Empire 40,462[2] 2,755 killed in action 1,847 died of wounds 17,580 died of disease 18,280 wounded  Kingdom of Sardinia 2,166[2] 28 killed in action 2,138 died of disease 530,125[2] 35,671 killed in action 37,454 died of wounds 377,000 died from non-combat causes 80,000 wounded[3][4]v t eCrimean WarBalkansOltenița Sinop Cetate Calafat SilistraCaucasusKurekdere KarsNaval OperationsSuomenlinna Bomarsund PetropavlovskCrimeaAlma Sevastopol Balaclava Inkerman Eupatoria Taganrog Chernaya Malakoff Great Redan Kinburnv t eRusso-Ottoman Wars1568–70 1676–81 1686–1700 1710–11 1735–39 1768–74 1787–92 1806–12 1828–29 1853–56 1877–78 1914–18Russ
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Data
Data
Data
(/ˈdeɪtə/ DAY-tə, /ˈdætə/ DAT-ə, /ˈdɑːtə/ DAH-tə)[1] is a set of values of qualitative or quantitative variables. Data
Data
and information are often used interchangeably; however, the extent to which a set of data is informative to someone depends on the extent to which it is unexpected by that person
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Nuns
A nun is a member of a religious community of women, typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience in the enclosure of a monastery.[1] While in common usage the terms nun and religious sister are often used interchangeably, they represent different forms of religious life; nuns are historically associated with living an ascetic life of prayer and contemplation in a monastery or convent, while religious sisters are devoted to an active vocation of prayer and charitable works in areas such as education and healthcare. Communities of nuns or religious sisters exist in numerous religious traditions, including Christianity, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Hinduism. In the Buddhist tradition, female monastics are known as Bhikkhuni, and take additional vows, compared to male monastics (bhikkhus); they are most common in Mahayana Buddhism, but have more recently become more prevalent in other traditions
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Shropshire
Shropshire
Shropshire
(/ˈʃrɒpʃər/ SHROP-shər or /ˈʃrɒpʃɪər/ SHROP-sheer; alternatively Salop;[citation needed] abbreviated, in print only, Shrops; demonym Salopian /səˈloʊpiən/ sə-LOH-pee-ən)[3] is a county in the West Midlands of England, bordering Wales
Wales
to the west, Cheshire
Cheshire
to the north, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the east, and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
and Herefordshire
Herefordshire
to the south. Shropshire Council
Shropshire Council
was created in 2009, a unitary authority taking over from the previous county council and five district councils
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New England Hospital For Women And Children
Contents1 Founding 2 The Hospital 3 Current Day 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksFounding[edit]Susan DimockMarie Zakrzewska was born on September 9, 1829 in Berlin. In one of her memoirs she wrote “I prefer to be remembered only as a woman who was willing to work for the elevation of woman.” She did just that by starting the hospital. As a child she followed her mother (a midwife) around the school of midwifery where she worked. Once she was 18 she applied to study midwifery, which was the only part of medicine women were allowed to work in, at the Royal Charité Hospital in Berlin. She was rejected, however she continued to apply at ages 19 and 20, but was still rejected. It was only once Dr. Joseph Hermann Schmidt, who worked at the school, used his influence to get her in that she finally was able to study medicine. Later, she moved to America, where women were allowed to be doctors. Once in New York, she met Dr
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Marianne Cope
Marianne Cope
Marianne Cope
OSF, also known as Saint
Saint
Marianne of Molokaʻi, (January 23, 1838 – August 9, 1918) was a German-born American religious sister who was a member of the Sisters of St Francis of Syracuse, New York, and administrator of its St. Joseph's Hospital in the city. Known also for her charitable works, in 1883 she relocated with six other sisters to Hawaiʻi to care for persons suffering Hansen's Disease on the island of Molokaʻi and aid in developing the medical infrastructure in Hawaiʻi
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Little Sisters Of The Poor
The Little Sisters of the Poor
Little Sisters of the Poor
is a Roman Catholic religious institute for women. It was founded in 1839 by Saint Jeanne Jugan.[1] Jugan established the order to care for the elderly,[1] having felt the need to care for the many impoverished elderly who lined the streets of French towns and cities. The motherhouse of the order is in Saint-Pern, France.[1] Internationally, the letters following their name are PSDP. In the United States, however, they are LSP. Today the Little Sisters of the Poor serve in 31 countries around the world (including homes in the US, Turkey, Hong Kong, Taiwan, India, Penang, New Zealand, and Philippines), continuing in their original purpose of caring for the elderly
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