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Nri Kingdom
The Kingdom of Nri
Kingdom of Nri
(Igbo: Ọ̀ràézè Ǹrì) was a medieval polity. The kingdom existed as a sphere of religious and political influence over a third of Igboland, and was administered by a priest-king called an Eze Nri. The Eze Nri managed trade and diplomacy on behalf of the Nri people, a subgroup of the Igbo-speaking people, and possessed divine authority in religious matters. The kingdom was a haven for all those who had been rejected in their communities and also a place where slaves were set free from their bondage.[citation needed] Nri expanded through converts gaining neighboring communities' allegiance, not by force.[citation needed] Nri's royal founder, Eri, is said to be a 'sky being' that came down to earth and then established civilization. One of the better-known remnants of the Nri civilization is its art, as manifested in the Igbo Ukwu bronze items
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NRI (other)
NRI may refer to:Kingdom of Nri, an Igbo kingdom that flourished between the 10th century and early 20th century National Radio Institute, a now defunct post-secondary vocational correspondence school National Resources Inventory Needham Research Institute Negative refractive index Networked Readiness Index Nomura Research Institute Non-recurring items, in income statement of financial accounts Non-resident Indian Non-roster invitee, in Major League Baseball Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitorThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title NRI. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the inten
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Oguta
Oguta
Oguta
is a town on the east bank of Oguta Lake
Oguta Lake
in Imo State
Imo State
of southeastern Nigeria. It is made up of 27 villages. The Oguta
Oguta
people refer to themselves as Umu-Ameshi. It is the administrative seat for Oguta
Oguta
LGA. Oguta
Oguta
was one of the first territories used by the British to advance into the Igbo hinterland. As of 2012 Oguta's population was estimated at 20,096.[1] The city of Oguta
Oguta
is divided into two townships, Oguta
Oguta
1 and Oguta
Oguta
2, separated by its popular lake with the Local Government HQ located at OGUTA 1
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Colonization
Colonization
Colonization
(or colonisation) is a process by which a central system of power dominates the surrounding land and its components. The term is derived from the Latin word colere, which means "to inhabit".[1] Also, colonization refers strictly to migration, for example, to settler colonies in America or Australia, trading posts, and plantations, while colonialism to the existing indigenous peoples of styled "new territories". Colonization
Colonization
was linked to the spread of tens of millions from Western European states all over the world. In many settled colonies, Western European settlers formed a large majority of the population. Examples include the Americas, Australia and New Zealand. These colonies were occasionally called 'neo-Europes'
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Benin Empire
The Kingdom of Benin, also known as the Benin
Benin
Kingdom, was a pre-colonial kingdom in what is now southern Nigeria. Its capital was Edo, now known as Benin City
Benin City
in Edo
Edo
state. It should not be confused with the modern-day Republic of Benin, formerly the Republic of Dahomey. The Benin
Benin
Kingdom was "one of the oldest and most highly developed states in the coastal hinterland of West Africa, dating perhaps to the eleventh century CE",[2] until it was annexed by the British Empire
British Empire
in 1897. The original people and founders of the Benin
Benin
Kingdom, the Edo
Edo
people, were initially ruled by the Ogiso (Kings of the Sky) who called their land Igodomigodo. The first Ogiso ( Ogiso Igodo), wielded much influence and gained popularity as a good ruler
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Idah
Idah
Idah
is a town in Kogi State, Nigeria, on the eastern bank of the Niger River
Niger River
in the middle belt region of Nigeria. It is the headquarter of the Igala Kingdom, and also a smaller Local Government Area with an area of 36 km² around the town, with a population of 79,815 at the 2006 census.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Economy 4 Education 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The town is the traditional capital of the Igala Kingdom, whose traditional ruler, the Attah Igala Alhaji Aliyu Obaje, died in July 2012. He was preceded by HRM Micheal Ameh Oboni II. Geography[edit] Idah, an old river port, lies on the eastern bank of the river Niger at 7°05′00″N 6°45′00″E / 7.08333°N 6.75000°E / 7.08333; 6.75000. Economy[edit] The town is a major food supplier of Kogi State
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Slavery
Slavery
Slavery
is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.[1] A slave is unable to withdraw unilaterally from such an arrangement and works without remuneration. Many scholars now use the term chattel slavery to refer to this specific sense of legalised, de jure slavery
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Atlantic Slave Trade
The Atlantic slave trade
Atlantic slave trade
or transatlantic slave trade involved the transportation by slave traders of enslaved African people, mainly from Africa
Africa
to the Americas, and then their sale there. The slave trade used mainly the triangular trade route and its Middle Passage, and existed from the 16th to the 19th centuries. The vast majority of those who were enslaved and transported in the transatlantic slave trade were Africans from central and western Africa, who had been sold by other West Africans to Western European slave traders (with a small number being captured directly by the slave traders in coastal raids), who brought them to the Americas.[1] The South Atlantic and Caribbean economies especially were dependent on the supply of secure labour for the production of commodity crops, making goods and clothing to sell in Europe
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Niger River
The Niger
Niger
River
River
(/ˈnaɪdʒər/; French: (le) fleuve Niger, pronounced [(lə) flœv niʒɛʁ]) is the principal river of West Africa, extending about 4,180 km (2,600 mi). Its drainage basin is 2,117,700 km2 (817,600 sq mi) in area.[3] Its source is in the Guinea
Guinea
Highlands in southeastern Guinea. It runs in a crescent through Mali, Niger, on the border with Benin
Benin
and then through Nigeria, discharging through a massive delta, known as the Niger
Niger
Delta or the Oil Rivers, into the Gulf of Guinea
Guinea
in the Atlantic Ocean. The Niger
Niger
is the third-longest river in Africa, exceeded only by the Nile
Nile
and the Congo River
River
(also known as the Zaïre River)
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Aboh
Aboh
Aboh
or Abo,[1] is a city in Delta State
Delta State
of Nigeria. It is the center of the Aboh
Aboh
Kingdom in Ndokwa land. It is located at an elevation of about 24m above sea level and is the headquarters of Ndokwa East Local Government Area in Delta State. There are various crude oil exploration and exploitation activities since the Aboh
Aboh
-1 exploration well was discovered in 1961. This field among others have proved hydrocarbons intervals in a simple roll over type structural setting. References[edit]^ "Ibo, a district of British West Africa..." ( Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Ibo". Encyclopædia Britannica. 14 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 223. )This Delta State, Nigeria
Nigeria
location article is a stub
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Onitsha
Onitsha
Onitsha
(Igbo: Ọ̀nị̀chà Mmílí[3] or just Ọ̀nị̀chà) is a city located on the eastern bank of the Niger River, in Nigeria's Anambra State. A metropolitan city, Onitsha
Onitsha
is known for its river port and as an economic hub for commerce, industry, and education. It hosts the Onitsha
Onitsha
Main Market, the largest market in Africa in terms of geographical size and volume of goods. In the 2006 Nigerian census, Onitsha
Onitsha
had an estimated city proper population of over quarter a million people, and, as of 2016, had an estimated urban population of 7,425,000.[4] The indigenous people of Onitsha
Onitsha
are Igbo and speak the Igbo language
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Yoruba Language
Yoruba (English: /ˈjɒrʊbə/;[3] Yor. èdè Yorùbá) is a language spoken in West Africa. The number of speakers of Yoruba is approaching 30 million.[1][4] It is a pluricentric language spoken principally in Benin
Benin
and Nigeria, with communities in other parts of Africa, the Americas, and Europe. A variety of the language, Lucumi, is the liturgical language of the Santería
Santería
religion of the Caribbean. Many Yoruba words are used in the Afro-Brazilian religion known as Candomblé. Yoruba is also used in many other Afro-American religions in the Americas
Americas
and the Caribbean
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Igbo-Ukwu
Igbo-Ukwu
Igbo-Ukwu
(Igbo: Great Igbo) is a town in the Nigerian state of Anambra
Anambra
in the southeastern part of the country. The town comprises seven villages: Obiuno, Ngo, Akukwa, Umudege, Ezihu, Ezigbo and Etiti.[2]Contents1 Archaeological significance 2 History2.1 Bronzes3 See also 4 References 5 External linksArchaeological significance[edit] Main article: Archaeology of Igbo-UkwuHuman and ram's head pendants from Igbo-Ukwu
Igbo-Ukwu
in the British Museum Igbo-Ukwu
Igbo-Ukwu
is notable for three archaeological sites, where excavations have found bronze artifacts from a highly sophisticated bronze metal-working culture dating perhaps to the ninth or tenth century, centuries before other known bronzes of the region. The first, called Igbo Isaiah, was uncovered in 1938 by Isaiah Anozie, a local villager, who found the bronze works while digging beside his home
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Edo
Edo
Edo
(江戸, "bay-entrance" or "estuary"), also romanized as Jedo, Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of Tokyo.[2] It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan
Japan
from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Magistrate2 Government and administration 3 Geography 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links8.1 HistoricHistory[edit] Main article: Edo
Edo
period From the establishment of the Tokugawa bakufu headquarters at Edo, the town became the de facto capital and center of political power, although Kyoto
Kyoto
remained the formal capital of the country
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Theocratic
Theocracy
Theocracy
is a form of government in which a deity is the source from which all authority derives. The Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
has this definition:1. a system of government in which priests rule in the name of God
God
or a god. 1.1. the commonwealth of Israel
Israel
from the time of Moses
Moses
until the election of Saul as King.[2][3]An ecclesiocracy is a situation where the religious leaders assume a leading role in the state, but do not claim that they are instruments of divine revelation: for example, the prince-bishops of the European Middle Ages, where the bishop was also the temporal ruler. Such a state may use the administrative hierarchy of the religion for its own administration, or it may have two 'arms'—administrators and clergy—but with the state administrative hierarchy subordinate to the religious hierarchy
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