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Novus Ordo
The MASS OF PAUL VI is the most commonly used form of the Mass used today within the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
, first promulgated by Pope Paul VI in the 1969 edition of the Roman Missal after the Second Vatican Council (1962–65). It is considered the ORDINARY FORM of the Roman Rite mass, as it is intended for use in most contexts. It is the successor to the Tridentine Mass
Tridentine Mass
used since 1570
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Society Of St. Pius X
The SOCIETY OF SAINT PIUS X (Latin : FRATERNITAS SACERDOTALIS SANCTI PII X; also known as the SSPX or the FSSPX) is an international priestly fraternity founded in 1970 by the French Roman Catholic Archbishop
Archbishop
Marcel Lefebvre
Marcel Lefebvre
. The society is known for rejecting many of the ecclesiastical reforms both influenced or institutionalized by the Second Vatican Council
Second Vatican Council
with the claim of maintaining orthodoxy and doctrinal purity among its followers. The present Superior General of the Society is Bishop Bernard Fellay
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Papal Bull
A PAPAL BULL is a specific kind of public decree, letters patent , or charter issued by a pope of the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
. It is named after the leaden seal (bulla ) that was traditionally appended to the end in order to authenticate it. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Format * 3 Seal * 4 Content * 5 See also * 6 Notes * 7 References * 8 Further reading HISTORY Printed text of Pope
Pope
Leo X 's Bull against the errors of Martin Luther , also known as Exsurge Domine , issued in June 1520 Papal bulls have been in use at least since the 6th century, but the phrase was not used until around the end of the 13th century, and then only internally for unofficial administrative purposes. However, it had become official by the 15th century, when one of the offices of the Apostolic Chancery was named the "register of bulls" ("registrum bullarum")
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Reform Of The Roman Breviary By Pope Pius X
The REFORM OF THE ROMAN BREVIARY BY POPE PIUS X was promulgated by that Pope with the Apostolic Constitution
Apostolic Constitution
"Divino Afflatu" of 1 November 1911. The ROMAN BREVIARY is the title of the book obligatorily used for celebrating the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
Divine Office from the revision of Pope Pius V ( Apostolic Constitution
Apostolic Constitution
Quod a nobis, 9 July 1568) to that by Pope Paul VI
Pope Paul VI
( Apostolic Constitution
Apostolic Constitution
Canticum laudis, 1 November 1970)
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Proper (liturgy)
The PROPER ( Latin
Latin
: proprium) is a part of the Christian liturgy that varies according to the date, either representing an observance within the liturgical year , or of a particular saint or significant event. The term is used in contrast to the ordinary , which is that part of the liturgy that is reasonably constant, or at least selected without regard to date, or to the common , which contains those parts of the liturgy that are common to an entire category of saints, such as apostles or martyrs . Propers may include hymns and prayers in the canonical hours and in the Eucharist
Eucharist

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Common (liturgy)
The COMMON or common of saints (Latin: commune sanctorum) is a part of the Christian liturgy that consists of texts common to an entire category of saints, such as apostles or martyrs . The term is used in contrast to the ordinary , which is that part of the liturgy that is reasonably constant, or at least selected without regard to date, and to the proper , which is the part of the liturgy that varies according to the date, either representing an observance within the liturgical year , or of a particular saint or significant event. Commons contain collects , psalms , readings from scripture , prefaces , and other portions of services that are common to a category of saints. This contrasts with propers, which contain the same elements as commons, but are tailored to specific occasions or feasts. Commons may be used to celebrate lesser feasts and observances in the Church calendar. REFERENCES * ^ Donald S. Armentrout, Robert Boak Slocum, eds. (2000)
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Liturgy Of The Hours
The LITURGY OF THE HOURS ( Latin
Latin
: Liturgia Horarum) or DIVINE OFFICE (Latin: Officium Divinum) or WORK OF GOD (Latin: Opus Dei) or CANONICAL HOURS , often referred to as the BREVIARY , is the official set of prayers "marking the hours of each day and sanctifying the day with prayer". It consists primarily of psalms supplemented by hymns , readings and other prayers and antiphons . Together with the Mass , it constitutes the official public prayer life of the Church. The Liturgy of the Hours also forms the basis of prayer within Christian monasticism . Celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours
Liturgy of the Hours
is an obligation undertaken by priests and deacons intending to become priests, while deacons intending to remain deacons are obliged to recite only a part. The constitutions of religious institutes generally oblige their members to celebrate at least parts and in some cases to do so jointly ("in choir")
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Psalter
A PSALTER is a volume containing the Book of Psalms
Book of Psalms
, often with other devotional material bound in as well, such as a liturgical calendar and litany of the Saints . Until the later medieval emergence of the book of hours , psalters were the books most widely owned by wealthy lay persons and were commonly used for learning to read. Many Psalters were richly illuminated and they include some of the most spectacular surviving examples of medieval book art. The English term ( Old English
Old English
psaltere, saltere) is from Church Latin psalterium, which is simply the name of the Book of Psalms
Book of Psalms
(in secular Latin, it is the term for a stringed instrument, from Greek ψαλτήριον psalterion). The Book of Psalms
Book of Psalms
contains the bulk of the Divine Office of the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church

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Pope Clement VIII
POPE CLEMENT VIII (Latin : Clemens VIII; 24 February 1536 – 3 March 1605), born IPPOLITO ALDOBRANDINI, was Pope
Pope
from 2 February 1592 to his death in 1605. Born into prominent Florentine family, he initially came to prominence as a canon lawyer before being made a Cardinal-Priest
Cardinal-Priest
in 1585. In 1592 he was elected Pope
Pope
and took the name of Clement. During his papacy he effected the reconciliation of Henry IV of France
France
to the Catholic faith and was instrumental in setting up an alliance of Christian nations to oppose the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
in the so-called Long War . He also successfully adjudicated in a bitter dispute between the Dominicans and the Jesuits
Jesuits
on the issue of efficacious grace and free will . In 1600 he presided over a jubilee which saw a large number of pilgrimages to Rome
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Pope Urban VIII
POPE URBAN VIII (Latin : Urbanus VIII; baptised 5 April 1568 – 29 July 1644), reigned as Pope
Pope
from 6 August 1623 to his death in 1644. He expanded the papal territory by force of arms and advantageous politicking, and was also a prominent patron of the arts and a reformer of Church missions. However, the massive debts incurred during his pontificate greatly weakened his successors, who were unable to maintain the papacy's longstanding political and military influence in Europe. He was also involved in a controversy with Galileo
Galileo
and his theory on heliocentrism during his reign. He is the most recent pope to date to take the pontifical name of Urban upon being elected as pope
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First Vatican Council
The VATICAN COUNCIL (Latin : Concilium Vaticanum Primum) was convoked by Pope Pius IX
Pope Pius IX
on 29 June 1868, after a period of planning and preparation that began on 6 December 1864. This, the twentieth ecumenical council of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
, held three centuries after the Council of Trent
Council of Trent
, opened on 8 December 1869 and adjourned on 20 October 1870. Unlike the five earlier General Councils held in Rome
Rome
, which met in the Lateran Basilica and are known as Lateran Councils , it met in the Vatican Basilica , hence its name. Its best-known decision is its definition of papal infallibility , strongly promoted by the Archbishop Luigi Natoli . The council was convoked to deal with the contemporary problems of the rising influence of rationalism , liberalism , and materialism
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Pope Pius X
POPE SAINT PIUS X (Italian : Pio X), born GIUSEPPE MELCHIORRE SARTO, (2 June 1835 – 20 August 1914) was Pope
Pope
from August 1903 to his death in 1914. He was canonized in 1954. Pius X is known for vigorously opposing modernist interpretations of Catholic doctrine, promoting traditional devotional practices and orthodox theology. His most important reform was to order the codification of the first Code of Canon Law , which collected the laws of the Church into one volume for the first time. He was also considered a pastoral pope, in the sense of encouraging personal holiness, piety and a daily lifestyle reflecting deep Christian values. He was born in the town of Riese , which would later append "Pio X" (Pius X's name in Italian) to the town's name
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Palm Sunday
PALM SUNDAY is a Christian moveable feast that falls on the Sunday before Easter
Easter
. The feast commemorates Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem
Jerusalem
, an event mentioned in each of the four canonical Gospels . In many Catholic and Episcopal denominations, worship services on Palm Sunday
Sunday
include a procession of the faithful carrying palms, representing the palm branches the crowd scattered in front of Jesus as he rode into Jerusalem
Jerusalem
. The difficulty of procuring palms in unfavorable climates led to their substitution with branches of native trees, including box , olive , willow , and yew . The Sunday
Sunday
was often named after these substitute trees, as in YEW SUNDAY, or by the general term BRANCH SUNDAY
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Easter Triduum
EASTER TRIDUUM ( Latin
Latin
: Triduum Paschale), HOLY TRIDUUM (Latin: Triduum Sacrum), PASCHAL TRIDUUM, or THE THREE DAYS is the period of three days that begins with the liturgy on the evening of Maundy Thursday (Holy Thursday) and ends with Evening Prayer on Easter Sunday. It recalls the passion , death , burial , and resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
, as portrayed in the canonical Gospels
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Holy Roman Emperor
The HOLY ROMAN EMPEROR (historically Romanorum Imperator " Emperor
Emperor
of the Romans") was the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
. The title was almost without interruption held in conjunction with the rule of the Kingdom of Germany . From an autocracy in Carolingian times the title evolved into an elected monarchy chosen by the prince-electors . The Holy Roman Emperor
Emperor
was widely perceived to rule by divine right by Roman Catholic rulers in Europe
Europe
, and he often contradicted or rivaled the Pope
Pope
, most notably during the Investiture controversy . In theory, the Holy Roman Emperor
Emperor
was primus inter pares (first among equals) among other Catholic monarchs
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Paschal Candle
A PASCHAL CANDLE is a large, white candle used in liturgies in Western Christianity
Western Christianity
(viz. , the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
, the Anglican Communion , and Lutheran
Lutheran
churches, among others). A new Paschal candle is blessed and lit every year at Easter, and is used throughout the Paschal season which is during Easter and then throughout the year on special occasions, such as baptisms and funerals . The equivalent of the Paschal candle
Paschal candle
in the Western Orthodox Church is the Paschal trikirion which differs both in style and usage
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