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Novus Ordo
The Mass of Paul VI
Mass of Paul VI
is the most commonly used form of the Mass in use today within the Catholic Church, first promulgated by Pope Paul VI
Pope Paul VI
in the 1969 edition of the Roman Missal
Roman Missal
after the Second Vatican Council (1962–65)
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Second Vatican Council
Four Constitutions: Sacrosanctum Concilium
Sacrosanctum Concilium
(Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy) Lumen gentium
Lumen gentium
(Dogmatic Constitution on the Church)
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Easter Triduum
Easter
Easter
Triduum (Latin: Triduum Paschale), Holy Triduum (Latin: Triduum Sacrum), or Paschal Triduum,[1] or The Three Days,[2] is the period of three days that begins with the liturgy on the evening of Maundy Thursday,[3] reaches its high point in the Easter
Easter
Vigil, and closes with evening prayer on Easter
Easter
Sunday
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First Vatican Council
The First Vatican Council
First Vatican Council
(Latin: Concilium Vaticanum Primum) was convoked by Pope Pius IX
Pope Pius IX
on 29 June 1868, after a period of planning and preparation that began on 6 December 1864.[1] This, the twentieth ecumenical coun
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Pope Pius X
Pope
Pope
Saint
Saint
Pius X (Italian: Pio), born Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto,[a] (2 June 1835 – 20 August 1914) was head of the Catholic Church from August 1903 to his death in 1914. He was canonized in 1954. Pius X is known for vigorously opposing modernist interpretations of Catholic doctrine, promoting traditional devotional practices and orthodox theology. His most important reform was to order the codification of the first Code of Canon Law, which collected the laws of the Church into one volume for the first time. He was also considered a pastoral pope, in the sense of encouraging personal holiness, piety and a daily lifestyle reflecting deep Christian values
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Psalter
A psalter is a volume containing the Book of Psalms, often with other devotional material bound in as well, such as a liturgical calendar and litany of the Saints. Until the later medieval emergence of the book of hours, psalters were the books most widely owned by wealthy lay persons and were commonly used for learning to read. Many Psalters were richly illuminated and they include some of the most spectacular surviving examples of medieval book art. The English term ( Old English
Old English
psaltere, saltere) is from Church Latin psalterium, which is simply the name of the Book of Psalms
Book of Psalms
(in secular Latin, it is the term for a stringed instrument, from Greek ψαλτήριον psalterion). The Book of Psalms
Book of Psalms
contains the bulk of the Divine Office of the Roman Catholic Church
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Liturgy Of The Hours
The Liturgy of the Hours
Liturgy of the Hours
(Latin: Liturgia Horarum) or Divine Office (Latin: Officium Divinum) or Work of God (Latin: Opus Dei) or canonical hours,[a] often referred to as the Breviary,[b] is the official set of prayers "marking the hours of each day and sanctifying the day with prayer".[3] It consists primarily of psalms supplemented by hymns, readings and other prayers and antiphons
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Papal Bull
A papal bull is a type of public decree, letters patent, or charter issued by a pope of the Roman Catholic Church. It is named after the leaden seal (bulla) that was traditionally appended to the end in order to authenticate it.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 Seal 4 Content 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further readingHistory[edit]Printed text of Pope
Pope
Leo X's Bull against the errors of Martin Luther, also known as Exsurge Domine, issued in June 1520Papal bulls have been in use at least since the 6th century, but the phrase was not used until around the end of the 13th century, and then only internally for unofficial administrative purposes
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Society Of St. Pius X
The Society of Saint Pius X
Society of Saint Pius X
(Latin: Fraternitas Sacerdotalis Sancti Pii X; also known as the SSPX or the FSSPX) is an international priestly fraternity founded in 1970 by the French Roman Catholic Archbishop
Archbishop
Marcel Lefebvre. The Society is known for rejecting many of the ecclesiastical reforms both influenced or institutionalized by the Second Vatican Council
Second Vatican Council
while maintaining Traditional Latin Mass
Traditional Latin Mass
among its followers
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Reform Of The Roman Breviary By Pope Pius X
The Reform of the Roman Breviary
Breviary
by Pope Pius X
Pope Pius X
was promulgated by that Pope with the Apostolic Constitution
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Proper (liturgy)
The proper (Latin: proprium) is a part of the Christian liturgy that varies according to the date, either representing an observance within the liturgical year, or of a particular saint or significant event. The term is used in contrast to the ordinary, which is that part of the liturgy that is reasonably constant, or at least selected without regard to date, or to the common, which contains those parts of the liturgy that are common to an entire category of saints, such as apostles or martyrs. Propers may include hymns and prayers in the canonical hours and in the Eucharist. West[edit] See also: Order of Mass
Order of Mass
§ Proprium The proper of the mass, strictly speaking, consists of the Introit, Gradual, Alleluia
Alleluia
or Tract, Sequence, Offertory, and Communion - in other words, all the variable portions of a mass which are spoken or sung by the choir or the people
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Common (liturgy)
The common or common of saints (Latin: commune sanctorum) is a part of the Christian liturgy that consists of texts common to an entire category of saints, such as apostles or martyrs. The term is used in contrast to the ordinary, which is that part of the liturgy that is reasonably constant, or at least selected without regard to date, and to the proper, which is the part of the liturgy that varies according to the date, either representing an observance within the liturgical year, or of a particular saint or significant event. Commons contain collects, psalms, readings from scripture, prefaces, and other portions of services that are common to a category of saints.[1] This contrasts with propers, which contain the same elements as commons, but are tailored to specific occasions or feasts. Commons may be used to celebrate lesser feasts and observances in the Church calendar. References[edit]^ Donald S. Armentrout, Robert Boak Slocum, eds. (2000)
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Palm Sunday
April 9 (Western) April 9 (Eastern)2018 dateMarch 25 (Western) April 1 (Eastern)2019 dateApril 14 (Western) April 21 (Eastern)2020 dateApril 5 (Western) April 12 (Eastern)These are small crosses made up of palm on occasion of palm Sunday.Palm Sunday
Sunday
is a Christian moveable feast that falls on the Sunday before Easter. The feast commemorates Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem, an event mentioned in each of the four canonical Gospels.[3] In many Catholic, Episcopal denominations and the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, worship services on Palm Sunday
Sunday
include a procession of the faithful carrying palms, representing the palm branches the crowd scattered in front of Jesus
Jesus
as he rode into Jerusalem
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Vigils
Vigils is a term for night prayer in ancient Christianity. See Vespers, Compline, Nocturns, Matins, and Lauds for more information. A vigil is a night spent in prayer. History[edit] The practice of rising at about the middle of the night, for the purpose of prayer, is as old as the Church.[1] The word "Vigils", at first applied to the night office, also comes from a Latin source, both as to the term and its use, namely the vigiliae or nocturnal watches or guards of the soldiers. The night from six o'clock in the evening to six o'clock in the morning was divided into four watches or vigils of three hours each, the first, the second, the third, and the fourth vigil. From the liturgical point of view and in its origin, the use of the term was very vague and elastic. Generally it designated the nightly meetings, synaxes, of the Christians. Under this form, the watch (vigil) might be said to date back as early as the beginning of Christianity
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Pope Clement VIII
Pope
Pope
Clement VIII (Latin: Clemens VIII; 24 February 1536 – 5 March 1605), born Ippolito Aldobrandini, was Pope
Pope
from 2 February 1592 to his death in 1605. Born in Fano, Italy[1] to a prominent Florentine family, he initially came to prominence as a canon lawyer before being made a Cardinal-Priest
Cardinal-Priest
in 1585. In 1592 he was elected Pope
Pope
and took the name of Clement. During his papacy he effected the reconciliation of Henry IV of France
Henry IV of France
to the Catholic faith and was instrumental in setting up an alliance of Christian nations to oppose the Ottoman Empire in the so-called Long War. He also successfully adjudicated in a bitter dispute between the Dominicans and the Jesuits
Jesuits
on the issue of efficacious grace and free will. In 1600 he presided over a jubilee which saw a large number of pilgrimages to Rome
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Pentecost
The Christian holiday of Pentecost, which is celebrated on the seventh Sunday (49 days) after Easter, commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles
Apostles
and other followers of Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ
while they were in Jerusalem
Jerusalem
celebrating the Feast of Weeks, as described in the Acts of the Apostles
Apostles
(Acts 2:1–31)
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