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Novellas
A novella is a text of written, fictional, narrative prose normally longer than a short story but shorter than a novel, somewhere between 7,500 and 40,000 words. The English word "novella" derives from the Italian novella,[1] derived from nuovo, which means "new"
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Novella (other)
A novella is a written, fictional, prose narrative longer than a novelette but shorter than a novel. Novella
Novella
may also refer to: Novella
Novella
(album), a 1977 album by Renaissance
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Black Death
The Black Death, also known as the Black Plague, Great Plague or simply Plague, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people in Eurasia
Eurasia
and peaking in Europe
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List Of Poetry Awards
This is a list of awards that are, or have been, given out to writers of poetry, either for a specific poem, collection of poems, or body of work. This is not intended to be an all-inclusive list of poetry awards; rather, it is a list of those awards which have entries on.Contents1 Major international awards 2 Asia 3 Africa 4 Australia 5 Austria 6 Canada 7 Chile7.1 Governor General's Awards8 Croatia 9 Germany 10 India 11 Ireland 12 Korea 13 New Zealand 14 Slovenia 15 Spanish (language) 16 United Kingdom 17 United States17.1 Awards given by the Academy of American Poets 17.2 Awards given by the Poetry
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Literary Criticism
Literary criticism
Literary criticism
(or literary studies) is the study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. Modern literary criticism is often influenced by literary theory, which is the philosophical discussion of literature's goals and methods. Though the two activities are closely related, literary critics are not always, and have not always been, theorists. Whether or not literary criticism should be considered a separate field of inquiry from literary theory, or conversely from book reviewing, is a matter of some controversy. For example, the Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism[1] draws no distinction between literary theory and literary criticism, and almost always uses the terms together to describe the same concept
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Literary Theory
The literary theory in a strict sense is the systematic study of the nature of literature and of the methods for analyzing literature.[1] However, literary scholarship since the 19th century often includes—in addition to, or even instead of literary theory in the strict sense—considerations of intellectual history, moral philosophy, social prophecy, and other interdisciplinary themes which are of relevance to the way humans interpret meaning.[1] In humanities in modern academia, the latter style of scholarship is an outgrowth of critical theory and is often called simply "theory".[2] As a consequence, the word "theory" has become an umbrella term for a variety of scholarly approaches to reading texts
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Critical Theory
Critical Theory is a school of thought that stresses the reflective assessment and critique of society and culture by applying knowledge from the social sciences and the humanities. As a term, Critical Theory has two meanings with different origins and histories: the first originated in sociology and the second originated in literary criticism, whereby it is used and applied as an umbrella term that can describe a theory founded upon critique; thus, the theorist Max Horkheimer described a theory as critical insofar as it seeks "to liberate human beings from the circumstances that enslave them".[1] In sociology and political philosophy, the term Critical Theory describes the neo- Marxist philosophy
Marxist philosophy
of the Frankfurt School, which was developed in Germany in the 1930s
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Sociology Of Literature
The sociology of literature is a subfield of the sociology of culture. It studies the social production of literature and its social implications. A notable example is Pierre Bourdieu's 1992 Les Règles de L'Art: Genèse et Structure du Champ Littéraire, translated by Susan Emanuel as Rules of Art: Genesis and Structure of the Literary Field (1996).Contents1 Classical sociology 2 Lukács and the theory of the novel 3 The Frankfurt School 4 The sociology of the avant-garde 5 The sociology of the book trade 6 Genetic structuralism 7 Sociocriticism 8 Neo-Marxian ideology critique 9 Bourdieu 10 The rise of the novel 11 Cultural materialism 12 World-systems theory 13 Recent developments 14 Notes 15 ReferencesClassical sociology[edit] None of the 'founding fathers' of sociology produced a detailed study of literature, but they did develop ideas that were subsequently applied to literature by others
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Literary Magazine
A literary magazine is a periodical devoted to literature in a broad sense. Literary magazines usually publish short stories, poetry, and essays, along with literary criticism, book reviews, biographical profiles of authors, interviews and letters. Literary magazines are often called literary journals, or little magazines, terms intended to contrast them with larger, commercial magazines.[1]Contents1 History 2 Online literary magazines 3 Little magazines 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] Nouvelles de la république des lettres is regarded as the first literary magazine; it was established by Pierre Bayle
Pierre Bayle
in France
France
in 1684.[2] Literary magazines became common in the early part of the 19th century, mirroring an overall rise in the number of books, magazines, and scholarly journals being published at that time
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Giovanni Boccaccio
Giovanni Boccaccio
Giovanni Boccaccio
(/boʊˈkɑːtʃioʊ, bə-, -tʃoʊ/; Italian: [dʒoˈvanni bokˈkattʃo]; 16 June 1313 – 21 December 1375)[1] was an Italian writer, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and an important Renaissance
Renaissance
humanist. Boccaccio wrote a number of notable works, including The Decameron
The Decameron
and On Famous Women. He wrote his imaginative literature mostly in the Italian vernacular, as well as other works in Latin, and is particularly noted for his realistic dialogue which differed from that of his contemporaries, medieval writers who usually followed formulaic models for character and plot.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Adult years2 Works 3 See also 4 Citations 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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The Decameron
The Decameron
The Decameron
(Italian: Decameron [deˈkaːmeron; dekameˈrɔn; dekameˈron] or Decamerone [dekameˈroːne]), subtitled Prince Galehaut (Old Italian: Prencipe Galeotto [ˈprentʃipe ɡaleˈɔtto; ˈprɛntʃipe]), is a collection of novellas by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio
Giovanni Boccaccio
(1313–1375). The book is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence
Florence
to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. Boccaccio probably conceived of The Decameron
The Decameron
after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. The various tales of love in The Decameron
The Decameron
range from the erotic to the tragic. Tales of wit, practical jokes, and life lessons contribute to the mosaic
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Florence
Florence
Florence
(/ˈflɒrəns/ FLORR-ənss; Italian: Firenze [fiˈrɛntse] ( listen))[2] is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,083 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.[3] Florence
Florence
was a centre of medieval European trade and finance and one of the wealthiest cities of that era.[4] It is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance, and has been called "the Athens
Athens
of the Middle Ages".[5] A turbulent political history includes periods of rule by the powerful Medici family and numerous religious and republican revolutions.[6] From 1865 to 1871 the city was the capital of the recently established Kingdom of Italy
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Lists Of Books
This is a list of book lists (bibliographies) on, organized by various criteria.Contents1 General lists 2 Selective lists 3 Subject lists3.1 History 3.2 People3.2.1 People in general 3.2.2 Specific persons3.3 Regions and places 3.4 Religion4 Writer lists 5 Series lists 6 Lists of fictional books 7 Lists of manuscripts 8 Mixed media lists 9 Lists by setting 10 See also10.1 Other lists 10.2 Digital libraries11 Further readingGeneral lists[edit]List of 18th-century British children's literature titles List of 19th-century British children's literature titles List of American children's books List of anonymously published works List of autobiographies List of banned books List of books written by teenagers List of book titles taken from literature List of books by year of publication List of children's books made into feature films List of Christian novels List of comic books Lists of dictionaries Lists of encyclopedias
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Marguerite De Navarre
Marguerite may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Entertainment 4 Ships 5 Other uses 6 See alsoPeople[edit] Marguerite (given name), including a list of people with the namePlaces[edit]Marguerite, California, a former settlement Marguerite, Pennsylvania, an unincorporated community Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula
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