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Nottuswara
The nottuswara or nottu swaras compositions (from "note swaras") are a set of 39 compositions in Carnatic classical music
Carnatic classical music
by Muthuswami Dikshitar (18th century), who was one of the three early composers celebrated as the Trinity of Carnatic music. They are notable as an interaction between the East and the West during Company rule, being based on Western sources, mostly simple melodies inspired by Scots and Irish tunes.[1] They are all composed with Sanskrit
Sanskrit
lyrics in the Western C major
C major
scale, whose pitch intervals correspond to that of the Shankarabharana
Shankarabharana
raga scale in Carnatic music, or the Bilaval that of Hindustani music
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Carnatic Classical Music
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chat
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C. P. Brown
Charles Philip Brown (10 November 1798 – 12 December 1884) was a British official of the East India Company. He worked in what is now Andhra Pradesh, and became an important scholarly figure in Telugu language literature.Contents1 Background 2 Biography 3 Legacy3.1 Works 3.2 Other publishings 3.3 Style 3.4 Death4 Awards and titles 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksBackground[edit] Telugu literature was in a dormant phase in the 18th century, for a number of social and political reasons: a lack of creative Telugu poets, prevailing illiteracy, and the decline of the Vijayanagara Empire, patrons of the literature. Brown as official in the region collected and edited works. He believed he had saved the heritage of the Telugu language. In his own words,"Telugu literature was dying out; the flame was flickering in the socket in 1825, I found Telugu literature dead
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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The Hindu
The Hindu
The Hindu
is an Indian daily newspaper. Headquartered at Chennai, The Hindu was published weekly when it was launched in 1878, and started publishing daily in 1889. It is one of the two Indian newspapers of record[6][7] and the second most circulated English-language newspaper in India, after The Times
The Times
of India
India
with average qualifying sales of 1.21 million copies as of Jan–Jun 2017.[4] The Hindu
The Hindu
has its largest base of circulation in southern India, and is the most widely read English daily newspaper in Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
and Kerala, Telangana, Karnataka. The newspaper and other publications in The Hindu Group are owned by a family-held company, Kasturi and Sons Ltd. In 2010, the newspaper employed over 1,600 workers and annual turnover reached almost $200 million[8] according to data from 2010
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Twelve Variations On "Ah Vous Dirai-je, Maman"
Twelve Variations on "Ah vous dirai-je, Maman", K. 265/300e, is a piano composition by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, composed when he was around 25 years old (1781 or 1782). This piece consists of twelve variations on the French folk song "Ah! vous dirai-je, maman". The French melody first appeared in 1761, and has been used for many children's songs, such as "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star", "Baa, Baa, Black Sheep" and the "Alphabet Song".[1]Contents1 Music 2 Composition date 3 References 4 External linksMusic[edit] Twelve Variations on "Ah vous dirai-je, Maman" (help·info), MIDI rendition, 11:51 minutes, 43 KBTwelve Variations on "Ah vous dirai-je, Maman"Live performance by Andriy Bondarenko (11:27 minutes)Problems playing this file? See media help.This work was composed for solo piano and consists of 13 sections: the first section is the theme, the other sections are Variations I to XII
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Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
"Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" is a popular English lullaby. The lyrics are from an early 19th-century English poem by Jane Taylor, "The Star". The poem, which is in couplet form, was first published in 1806 in Rhymes for the Nursery, a collection of poems by Taylor and her sister Ann. It is sung to the tune of the French melody Ah! vous dirai-je, maman, which was published in 1761 and later arranged by several composers including Mozart
Mozart
with Twelve Variations on "Ah vous dirai-je, Maman".[1] The English lyrics have five stanzas, although only the first is widely known. It has a Roud Folk Song Index
Roud Folk Song Index
number of 7666
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Rakes Of Mallow
Mallow or mallows may refer to:Contents1 Nature 2 Places 3 People 4 Characters 5 Vehicles 6 Other 7 See alsoNature[edit]Malvaceae, family of plants; in particular the following genera:Abelmoschus, a genus of about fifteen species of flowering plants Althaea (plant), marsh mallow Callirhoe (plant), poppy mallow Corchorus, mallow, molokia, mlukhia Eremalche, flowering plants endemic to the US desert southwest Hibiscus, rosemallow Kosteletzkya, seashore mallow Lavatera, tree mallow or rose mallow Malacothamnus, bush-mallow Malva, mallow Malvaviscus, Turk's cap mallow, wax mallow Sidalcea, Greek mallow, chequer-mallow Sphaeralcea, globemallowinsects:Larentia clavaria, mallow, species of moth Mallow skipper, butterflyPlaces[edit]Mallow, Iran, a village in Razavi Khorasan Province, Iran Mallow, County Cork, a town in the Republic of IrelandMallow (Parliament of Ireland constituency) Mallow GAA, a Gaelic football and hurlin
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My Country, 'Tis Of Thee
"My Country, 'Tis of Thee", also known as "America", is an American patriotic song, whose lyrics were written by Samuel Francis Smith.[2] The melody used is the same as that of the national anthem of the United Kingdom, "God Save the Queen", arranged by Thomas Arne. The song served as one of the de facto national anthems of the United States (along with songs like "Hail, Columbia") before the adoption of "The Star-Spangled Banner" as the official anthem in 1931.[3]"My Country, 'Tis of Thee"Piano and violin arrangement of "My Country, 'Tis of Thee"Problems playing this file? See media help.Contents1 History 2 Lyrics 3 Notable performances 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksHistory[edit] Samuel Francis Smith
Samuel Francis Smith
wrote the lyrics to "My Country 'Tis of Thee" in 1831,[4] while he was a student at the Andover Theological Seminary
Andover Theological Seminary
in Andover, Massachusetts
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God Save The Queen
"God Save the Queen" (alternatively "God Save the King", depending on the gender of the reigning monarch) is the national or royal anthem in a number of Commonwealth realms, their territories, and the British Crown Dependencies.[1][2] The author of the tune is unknown and it may originate in plainchant, but an attribution to John Bull is sometimes made. It is the national anthem of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and one of two national anthems used by New Zealand
New Zealand
since 1977, as well as for several of the UK's territories that have their own additional local anthem. It is also the royal anthem – played specifically in the presence of the monarch – of all the aforementioned countries, as well as Australia
Australia
(since 1984), Canada
Canada
(since 1980),[3] Barbados
Barbados
and Tuvalu
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Telugu Language
 India Spoken in these States and union territories of India:Andhra Pradesh TelanganaLanguage codesISO 639-1 teISO 639-2 telISO 639-3 telGlottolog telu1262  Telugu[3] oldt1249  Old Telugu[4]Linguasphere 49-DBA-aaTelugu is native to Andhra Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh
and TelanganaThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.Telugu (English: /ˈtɛlʊɡuː/;[5] తెలుగు [t̪el̪uɡu]) is a South-central Dravidian language
Dravidian language
native to India
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Violin
The violin, also known informally as a fiddle, is a wooden string instrument in the violin family. Most violins have a hollow wooden body. It is the smallest and highest-pitched instrument in the family in regular use. Smaller violin-type instruments are known, including the violino piccolo and the kit violin, but these are virtually unused. The violin typically has four strings tuned in perfect fifths, and is most commonly played by drawing a bow across its strings, though it can also be played by plucking the strings with the fingers (pizzicato) and by striking the strings with the wooden side of the bow (col legno). Violins are important instruments in a wide variety of musical genres. They are most prominent in the Western classical tradition, both in ensembles (from chamber music to orchestras) and as solo instruments and in many varieties of folk music, including country music, bluegrass music and in jazz
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Muthuswami Dikshitar
Muthuswami Dikshitar
Muthuswami Dikshitar
(muddusvami dikshita in Telugu and Kannada[citation needed]) (March 24, 1775 – October 21, 1835) was a South Indian poet and composer and is one of the musical trinity of Carnatic music. His compositions, of which around 500 are commonly known, are noted for their elaborate and poetic descriptions of Hindu gods and temples and for capturing the essence of the raga forms through the vainika (veena) style that emphasises gamakas. They are typically in a slower speed (chowka kala)
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Western Classical Music
Classical music
Classical music
is art music produced or rooted in the traditions of Western culture, including both liturgical (religious) and secular music. While a more precise term is also used to refer to the period from 1750 to 1820 (the Classical period), this article is about the broad span of time from before the 6th century AD to the present day, which includes the Classical period and various other periods.[1] The central norms of this tradition became codified between 1550 and 1900, which is known as the common-practice period
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That (music)
A thāt (Hindi: ठाट; Marathi: थाट; Bengali: ঠাট; Urdu: ٹھاٹھ‎; also transliterated as thaat) is a mode in north Indian or Hindustani music.[1] Thāts always have seven different pitches (called swara) and are a basis for the organization and classification of ragas in classical music.Contents1 History 2 System 3 Description of ten basic thāts3.1 1. Bilawal 3.2 2. Khamaj 3.3 3. Kafi 3.4 4. Asavari 3.5 5. Bhairavi 3.6 6. Bhairav 3.7 7. Kalyan 3.8 8. Marwa 3.9 9. Poorvi 3.10 10. Todi4 Thāt and time of performance 5 Notes 6 LiteratureHistory[edit] The modern thāt system was created by Vishnu Narayan Bhatkhande (1860–1936), one of the most influential musicologists in the field of classical music in the early decades of the twentieth century.[2][3] Bhatkhande modeled his system after the Carnatic melakarta classification, devised around 1640 A.D. by the musicologist Venkatamakhin
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