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North Korean Abductions Of Japanese Citizens
The abductions of Japanese citizens from Japan by agents of the North Korean government took place during a period of six years from 1977 to 1983.[1] Although only 17 Japanese (eight men and nine women) are officially recognized by the Japanese government as having been abducted,[2] there may have been hundreds of victims.[3] The North Korean government has officially admitted to abducting 13 Japanese citizens.[4][5] There are testimonies that many non-Japanese citizens, including nine European citizens,[6] have been abducted by North Korea.[7]Contents1 Background 2 Talks between North Korea and Japan in 2002 and aftermath2.1 Return of five victims 2.2 Children/spouses of returned victims reunited 2.3 Further evidence and investigations 2.4 Current situation (2004–present)3 List of victims 4 Other abductions by North Korea 5 Controversies 6 In fiction 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksBackground[edit] In the 1970s, a number
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Japan–North Korea Pyongyang Declaration
The Japan-North Korea Pyongyang Declaration, signed in 2002, was the result of the first Japan-North Korea summit meeting. It was an attempt to resolve the uneasy diplomatic relationship that existed between the two nations, provided for economic assistance to North Korea (including humanitarian aid), low-interest long-term loans, and discussed the future of nuclear missile development. North Korea agreed to extend its moratorium on missile tests, in place since 1999. However, this may have been breached
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Kim Jong-il
^ North Korean biographies, which claim his birth date as 16 February 1942, are generally not considered to be factually reliable.Central institution membership1980–2011: Member, Presidium of the Political Bureau of the 6th Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea 1974–2011: Member, Political Bureau of the 5th, 6th Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea 1972–1997: Secretariat of the Workers' Party of Korea 1972–2011: Member, 5th, 6th Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea 1982–2011: Deputy, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th Supreme People's AssemblyOther offices held1997–2011: Chairman, Central Military Commission of the Workers' Party of Korea 1980–1997: Member, Central Military Commission of the Workers' Party of Korea 1990–1993: First Vice Chairman, National Defense CommissionLeaders of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea← Kim Il-sung
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Junichiro Koizumi
Junichiro Koizumi
Junichiro Koizumi
(小泉 純一郎, Koizumi Jun'ichirō, born January 8, 1942) is a Japanese politician who was the 56th Prime Minister of Japan
Japan
from 2001 to 2006. He retired from politics when his term in parliament ended in 2009,[1] and is the sixth longest serving PM in Japanese history. Widely seen as a maverick leader of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), he became known as an economic reformer, focusing on Japan's government debt and the privatization of its postal service. In 2005, Koizumi led the LDP to win one of the largest parliamentary majorities in modern Japanese history
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Norimitsu Onishi
Norimitsu Onishi (大西 哲光, Ōnishi Norimitsu) is a Japanese Canadian journalist. He is Southern Africa Bureau Chief for the New York Times. He was a member of The New York Times
The New York Times
reporting team that received the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting
Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting
for coverage of the 2014 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa.[1] Team members named by The Times were Pam Belluck, Helene Cooper, Sheri Fink, Adam Nossiter, Onishi, Kevin Sack, and Ben C. Solomon.[2] More recently Onishi has written about the lonely deaths of the elderly in Japan. Readers thanked Norimitsu for his "profoundly moving piece" about two people who live alone in a danchi, a sprawling government apartment complex, outside Tokyo.[3]Contents1 Career 2 Criticism 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Onishi was born in Ichikawa, Chiba
Ichikawa, Chiba
Prefecture, Japan
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Conspiracy Theory
A conspiracy theory is an explanation of an event or situation that invokes an unwarranted conspiracy, generally one involving an illegal or harmful act carried out by government or other powerful actors. Conspiracy
Conspiracy
theories often produce hypotheses that contradict the prevailing understanding of history or simple facts
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Japan Socialist Party
The Social Democratic Party (社会民主党 Shakai Minshu-tō, often abbreviated to 社民党 Shamin-tō), also known as the Social Democratic Party of Japan
Japan
(日本社会党, abbreviated to SDPJ in English) and previously as the Japan
Japan
Socialist Party (JSP), is a political party that at various times advocated the establishment of a socialist Japan, until 1996.[2] Since its reformation and name change in 1996, it has defined itself as a social-democratic party.[3] The party was reformed in January 1996 by the majority of legislators of the former Social Party of Japan, which was Japan's largest opposition party in the 1955 system. However, after that, most of the legislators joined the Democratic Party of Japan. Five leftist legislators who did not join the SDP formed the New Socialist Party, which lost all its seats in the following elections
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Japan Airlines Flight 351
Japan
Japan
Airlines Flight 351 was hijacked by nine members of the Japanese Communist League-Red Army Faction (a predecessor of the Japanese Red Army) on March 31, 1970, while flying from Tokyo
Tokyo
to Fukuoka, in an incident usually referred to in Japanese as the Yodogo Hijacking (よど号ハイジャック事件, Yodogō Haijakku Jiken).Contents1 Hijacking 2 Later events 3 Notable passengers 4 See also 5 ReferencesHijacking[edit] Armed with samurai swords and pipe bombs,[1] the hijackers took 129 hostages (122 passengers and seven crew members), later releasing them at Fukuoka Airport
Fukuoka Airport
and Seoul's Kimpo Airport
Kimpo Airport
(after an abortive attempt to disguise the airport as North Korean)
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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Niigata, Niigata
Niigata (新潟市, Niigata-shi, Japanese: [niːɡata]) is the capital and the most populous city of Niigata Prefecture, Japan. It lies on the northwest coast of Honshu, the largest island of Japan, in the Chūbu region
Chūbu region
and faces the Sea of Japan
Japan
and Sado Island. As of 1 June 2016[update], the city had an estimated population of 807,450 and a population density of 1,110 persons per km2. The total area is 726.45 square kilometres (280.48 sq mi). Greater Niigata, Niigata
Niigata, Niigata
Metropolitan Employment Area, has a GDP of US$43.3 billion as of 2010.[2][3] With a long history as a port town, Niigata became a free port following the Meiji Restoration. Niigata's city government was established in 1889. Mergers with nearby municipalities in 2005 allowed the city's population to jump to 810,000
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Government Of Japan
The government of Japan
Japan
is a constitutional monarchy in which the power of the Emperor is limited and is relegated primarily to ceremonial duties. As in many other states, the Government
Government
is divided into three branches: the Executive branch, the Legislative branch
Legislative branch
and the Judicial branch. The Government
Government
runs under the framework established by the Constitution of Japan, adopted in 1947. It is a unitary state, containing forty-seven administrative divisions, with the Emperor as its head of state.[1] His role is ceremonial and he has no powers related to Government.[2] Instead, it is the Cabinet, composing of the Ministers of State and the Prime Minister, that directs and controls the Government
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Hoeryong Reeducation Camp
Kyo-hwa-so Hoeryong
Hoeryong
is a "reeducation camp" in Hoeryong, in North Hamgyong province of North Korea.[1] It is not to be confused with Haengyong political prison camp (Kwan-li-so Nr. 22), which is located 10 km (6.2 mi) north-east of Hoeryong
Hoeryong
and is sometimes also called Hoeryong
Hoeryong
camp. See also[edit]Human Rights in North Korea Kaechon concentration campReferences[edit]^ "The Hidden Gulag – Exposing Crimes against Humanity in North Korea's Vast Prison System (p. 107 - 108)" (PDF). The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea
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Censorship In North Korea
Censorship in North Korea
Censorship in North Korea
ranks among some of the most extreme in the world, with the government able to take strict control over communications. North Korea is routinely ranked at the bottom of Reporters Without Borders' annual Press Freedom Index, occupying the very last place in 2017. All media outlets are strictly owned and controlled by the North Korean government. As such, all media in North Korea gets its news from the Korean Central News Agency. The media dedicates a large portion of its resources toward political propaganda and promoting the personality cult of Kim Il-sung, Kim Jong-il[1] and Kim Jong-un
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Hamhung Concentration Camp
Hamhung
Hamhung
concentration camp (also spelled Hamheung) is a reeducation camp in North Korea. The official name of the camp is Kyo-hwa-so No. 9 (Reeducation camp no. 9). The sub-facility for women is sometimes called Kyo-hwa-so No. 15.[1]Contents1 Location 2 Description 3 Living conditions 4 Working conditions 5 Human rights violations 6 Prisoners (witnesses) 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksLocation[edit] The camp is located in Humhung city, in South Hamgyong
South Hamgyong
province of North Korea.[2] The main facility for male prisoners is situated in Hoesang-dong, about 6 km (3.7 mi) northeast of downtown Hamhung
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Oro Concentration Camp
Kyo-hwa-so No. 22 Oro is a "reeducation camp" with ca. 1,000 prisoners in South Hamgyong, North Korea.[1] See also[edit]Human Rights in North Korea Kaechon concentration campReferences[edit]^ "The Hidden Gulag – Exposing Crimes against Humanity in North Korea's Vast Prison System (p. 98 - 100)" (PDF). The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea. Retrieved September 14, 2012. External links[edit]Committee for Human Rights in North Korea: The Hidden Gulag - Overview of North Korean prison camps with testimonies and satellite photographsv t ePrison camps of North KoreaPolitical prison camps (Kwalliso)Chongjin (25) Hoeryong (22) Hwasong (16) Kaechon (14) Pukchang (18) Yodok (15)Reeducation camps (Kyohwaso)Chongori (12) Chungsan (11) Hamhung (15) Hoeryong () Kangdong (4) Kaechon (1) Oro (22) Ryongdam (8) Sinuiju (3) Tanchon (77)This Korea-related article is a stub
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Tanchon Concentration Camp
Kyo-hwa-so No. 77 Tanchon
Tanchon
is a "reeducation camp" with ca. 6,000 prisoners near Tanchon
Tanchon
in South Hamgyong
South Hamgyong
province, North Korea.[1] See also[edit]Human Rights in North Korea Kaechon concentration campReferences[edit]^ "The Hidden Gulag – Exposing Crimes against Humanity in North Korea's Vast Prison System (p. 105 - 106)" (PDF). The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea
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