HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Norman Malcolm
Norman Malcolm
Norman Malcolm
(/ˈmælkəm/; 11 June 1911 – 4 August 1990) was an American philosopher.Contents1 Life 2 Publications 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Malcolm was born in Selden, Kansas. He studied philosophy with O.K. Bouwsma at the University of Nebraska, then enrolled as a graduate student at Harvard University
Harvard University
in 1933. At Cambridge University
Cambridge University
in 1938-9, he met G. E. Moore
G. E. Moore
and Ludwig Wittgenstein. Malcolm attended Wittgenstein's lectures on the philosophical foundations of mathematics throughout 1939 and remained one of Wittgenstein's closest friends
[...More...]

"Norman Malcolm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Therapeutic Approach
The therapeutic approach to philosophy sees philosophical problems as misconceptions that are to be therapeutically dissolved. The approach stems from Ludwig Wittgenstein.[1][2]There is not a single philosophical method, though there are indeed methods, different therapies, as it were. — Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations, §133dQuietism, The New Wittgenstein and anti-philosophy take a therapeutic approach. References[edit]^ http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/wittgenstein/, Anat Biletzki and Anat Matar, "Ludwig Wittgenstein", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Edward N
[...More...]

"Therapeutic Approach" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

René Descartes
René Descartes
René Descartes
(/ˈdeɪˌkɑːrt/;[9] French: [ʁəne dekaʁt]; Latinized: Renatus Cartesius; adjectival form: "Cartesian";[10] 31 March 1596 – 11 February 1650) was a French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist. Dubbed the father of modern western philosophy, much of subsequent Western philosophy
Western philosophy
is a response to his writings,[11][12] which are studied closely to this day. A native of the Kingdom of France, he spent about 20 years (1629–49) of his life in the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
after serving for a while in the Dutch States Army of Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange
Prince of Orange
and the Stadtholder
Stadtholder
of the United Provinces
[...More...]

"René Descartes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ideal Language Philosophy
Linguistic philosophy is the view that philosophical problems are problems which may be solved (or dissolved) either by reforming language, or by understanding more about the language we presently use.[1] The former position is that of ideal language philosophy, the latter the position of ordinary language philosophy.[2]Contents1 See also 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksSee also[edit]Analytic philosophy § Ideal language analysis Linguistic turnNotes[edit]^ Rorty 1967, page 3. ^ Rorty 1967.References[edit]Richard Rorty, 1967. Introduction: Metaphilosophical difficulties of linguistic philosophy. In Richard Rorty
Richard Rorty
(ed.). The Linguistic Turn: Recent Essays in Philosophical Method. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 1967.External links[edit]Entry on analytic philosophy in the Internet Encyclopedia of PhilosophyThis philosophy of language-related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Ideal Language Philosophy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anti-skepticism
For a more general discussion of skepticism, please look at: Skepticism Philosophical skepticism
Philosophical skepticism
(UK spelling scepticism; from Greek σκέψις skepsis, "inquiry") is a philosophical school of thought that questions the possibility of certainty in knowledge
[...More...]

"Anti-skepticism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Selden, Kansas
Selden is a city in Sheridan County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 219.[6]Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Climate3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Education 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Selden was laid out in 1888.[7] It was named for one of its founders, Selden G. Hopkins.[8] The first post office in Selden was established in July 1888.[9] In 1893, not long after its founding, tragedy struck the rural town. A mysterious fire started among the files in the courthouse. All attempts to put the fires out failed, and the entire courthouse burnt to the ground
[...More...]

"Selden, Kansas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Logical Truth
Logical truth is one of the most fundamental concepts in logic, and there are different theories on its nature. A logical truth is a statement which is true, and remains true under all reinterpretations of its components other than its logical constants. It is a type of analytic statement. All of philosophical logic can be thought of as providing accounts of the nature of logical truth, as well as logical consequence.[1] Logical truths (including tautologies) are truths which are considered to be necessarily true. This is to say that they are considered to be such that they could not be untrue and no situation could arise which would cause us to reject a logical truth. It must be true in every sense of intuition, practices, and bodies of beliefs. However, it is not universally agreed that there are any statements which are necessarily true. A logical truth is considered by some philosophers to be a statement which is true in all possible worlds
[...More...]

"Logical Truth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

State Of Affairs (philosophy)
In philosophy, a state of affairs (German: Sachverhalt), also known as a situation, is a way the actual world must be in order to make some given proposition about the actual world true; in other words, a state of affairs (situation) is a truth-maker, whereas a proposition is a truth-bearer. Whereas states of affairs (situations) either obtain or fail-to-obtain, propositions are either true or false.[1]Contents1 Overview 2 See also 3 Notes 4 ReferencesOverview[edit] In a sense of "state of affairs" favored by Ernest Sosa, states of affairs are situational conditions. In fact, in the Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy,[2] Sosa defines a condition to be a state of affairs, "way things are" or situation—most commonly referred to by a nominalization of a sentence
[...More...]

"State Of Affairs (philosophy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Truth Function
In logic, a truth function[1] is a function that accepts truth values as input and produces a truth value as output, i.e., the input and output are all truth values
[...More...]

"Truth Function" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wittgensteinian Fideism
Fideism
Fideism
(/ˈfideɪˌɪzəm, ˈfaɪdi-/) is an epistemological theory which maintains that faith is independent of reason, or that reason and faith are hostile to each other and faith is superior at arriving at particular truths (see natural theology). The word fideism comes from fides, the Latin word for faith, and literally means "faith-ism."[1] Theologians and philosophers have responded in various ways to the place of faith and reason in determining the truth of metaphysical ideas, morality, and religious beliefs. A fideist is one who argues for fideism
[...More...]

"Wittgensteinian Fideism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Truth Table
A truth table is a mathematical table used in logic—specifically in connection with Boolean algebra, boolean functions, and propositional calculus—which sets out the functional values of logical expressions on each of their functional arguments, that is, for each combination of values taken by their logical variables (Enderton, 2001). In particular, truth tables can be used to show whether a propositional expression is true for all legitimate input values, that is, logically valid. A truth table has one column for each input variable (for example, P and Q), and one final column showing all of the possible results of the logical operation that the table represents (for example, P XOR Q). Each row of the truth table contains one possible configuration of the input variables (for instance, P=true Q=false), and the result of the operation for those values. See the examples below for further clarification
[...More...]

"Truth Table" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Truth Condition
In semantics and pragmatics, a truth condition is the condition under which a sentence is true. For example, "It is snowing in Nebraska" is true precisely when it is snowing in Nebraska. Truth conditions of a sentence don't necessarily reflect current reality. They are merely the conditions under which the statement would be true.[1] More formally, a truth condition makes for the truth of a sentence in an inductive definition of truth (for details, see the semantic theory of truth). Understood this way, truth conditions are theoretical entities. To illustrate with an example: suppose that, in a particular truth theory[2] which is a theory of truth where truth is somehow made acceptable despite semantic terms as close as possible, the word "Nixon" refers to Richard M. Nixon, and "is alive" is associated with the set of currently living things. Then one way of representing the truth condition of "Nixon is alive" is as the ordered pair <Nixon, x: x is alive >
[...More...]

"Truth Condition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Søren Kierkegaard
Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (/ˈsɔːrən ˈkɪərkɪɡɑːrd/ or /-ɡɔːr/; Danish: [sɶːɐn ˈkiɐ̯ɡəɡɒːˀ] ( listen); 5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic and religious author who is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher.[6][7] He wrote critical texts on organized religion, Christendom, morality, ethics, psychology, and the philosophy of religion, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and parables
[...More...]

"Søren Kierkegaard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
[...More...]

"Harvard University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kansas
Kansas
Kansas
/ˈkænzəs/ ( listen) is a U.S. state
U.S. state
in the Midwestern United States.[10] Its capital is Topeka
Topeka
and its largest city is Wichita. Kansas
Kansas
is named after the Kansa Native American tribe, which inhabited the area.[11] The tribe's name (natively kką:ze) is often said to mean "people of the (south) wind" although this was probably not the term's original meaning.[12][13] For thousands of years, what is now Kansas
Kansas
was home to numerous and diverse Native American tribes. Tribes in the eastern part of the state generally lived in villages along the river valleys
[...More...]

"Kansas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philosophy Of Mind
Philosophy
Philosophy
of mind is a branch of philosophy that studies the nature of the mind. The mind–body problem is a paradigm issue in philosophy of mind, although other issues are addressed, such as the hard problem of consciousness, and the nature of particular mental states.[2][3][4] Aspects of the mind that are studied include mental events, mental functions, mental properties, consciousness, the ontology of the mind, the nature of thought, and the relationship of the mind to the body. Dualism and monism are the two central schools of thought on the mind–body problem, although nuanced views have arisen that do not fit one or the other category neatly
[...More...]

"Philosophy Of Mind" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.