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Nordkreis-Liga
The Nordkreis-Liga
Nordkreis-Liga
(English: Northern district league) was the highest association football league in the German Grand Duchy of Hesse
Grand Duchy of Hesse
and the Prussian province of Hesse-Nassau
Hesse-Nassau
from 1909 to 1918. The league was disbanded with the introduction of the Kreisliga
Kreisliga
Nordmain, Kreisliga Südmain and Kreisliga Hessen
Kreisliga Hessen
in 1919.Contents1 History 2 National success2.1 Southern German championship 2.2 German championship3 Winners and runners-up of the Nordkreis-Liga
Nordkreis-Liga
and championship 4 Placings in the Nordkreis-Liga
Nordkreis-Liga
1909-14 5 References5.1 Sources6 External linksHistory[edit] The league was formed in a move to improve the organisation of football in Southern Germany in the early 1900s
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Verbandsliga
The Verbandsliga
Verbandsliga
(English: Football Association League) is usually a tier-six football league in the German football league system, covering the area of a Bundesland or a regional part of such Bundesland. [1][2][3] As the German football league system
German football league system
below the tier-four Regionalliga is organised individually by the 21 state member associations of the nationwide governing body German Football Association
German Football Association
(Deutscher Fußball-Bund), the league structure varies somewhat from state to state
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Kicker (sports Magazine)
kicker Sportmagazin (commonly kicker) is Germany's leading sports magazine and is focused primarily on football. The magazine was founded in 1920 by German football pioneer Walther Bensemann
Walther Bensemann
and is published twice a week, usually Monday and Thursday, in Nuremberg. The Monday edition sells an average of 240,000 copies, while the Thursday edition has an average circulation of about 220,000 copies (2005 figures). The magazine also publishes a yearbook, the kicker Almanach
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List Of German Football Champions
The German football champions are the annual winners of the highest association football competition in Germany. The history of the German football championship is complex and reflects the turbulent history of the country through the course of the 20th century. Brought to the country by English expatriates, the sport had taken root in the cities of Berlin, Hamburg, Stuttgart, and Leipzig
Leipzig
in the 1890s,[1] leading to the growth of city, regional, and academic leagues, each with their own championships
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Hesse Football League System
The German football league system, or league pyramid, refers to the hierarchically interconnected league system for association football in Germany
Germany
that in the 2016–17 season consists of 2,235 divisions having 31,645 teams, in which all divisions are bound together by the principle of promotion and relegation. The top three professional levels contain one division each. Below this, the semi-professional and amateur levels have progressively more parallel divisions, which each cover progressively smaller geographic areas. Teams that finish at the top of their division at the end of each season can rise higher in the pyramid, while those that finish at the bottom find themselves sinking further down. In theory it is possible for even the lowest local amateur club to rise to the top of the system and become German football champions one day
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2. Bundesliga
The 2. Bundesliga
Bundesliga
(Zweite Bundesliga, [ˈt͡svaɪ̯tə ˈbʊndəsliːɡa]) is the second division of professional football in Germany. The 2. Bundesliga
Bundesliga
is ranked below the Bundesliga
Bundesliga
and above the 3. Liga
3. Liga
in the German football league system. All of the 2. Bundesliga
Bundesliga
clubs qualify for the DFB-Pokal, the annual German Cup competition. A total of 125 clubs have competed in the 2. Bundesliga since its foundation. The decision to establish the league as the second level of football in West Germany
Germany
was made in May 1973. The league started operating in August 1974, then with two divisions of 20 clubs. It was reduced to a single division in 1981
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3. Liga (Germany)
The 3. Liga
3. Liga
(German: Dritte Liga when written in full; more explicit: 3. Fußball-Liga), is the third division of football in Germany. The league started with the beginning of the 2008–09 season, when it replaced the Regionalliga
Regionalliga
as the third tier football league in Germany. In the German football league system, it is positioned between the 2. Bundesliga
2. Bundesliga
and the semi-professional Regionalliga, which became the fourth division and initially consisted of three groups of 18 clubs playing separately.[1] In Germany, the 3. Liga
3. Liga
is the highest division that a football club's reserve team can play in.Contents1 History 2 Financial situation 3 Clubs 4 Set-up4.1 Qualifying for the 3. Liga 4.2 Promotion and relegation5 League statistics5.1 Attendance 5.2 Top scorers 5.3 Records6 Placings in the 3. Liga6.1 Notes7 Promotion rounds7.1 To the 2
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FSV Frankfurt
Frankfurt, officially Frankfurt
Frankfurt
am Main (German: [ˈfʁaŋkfʊɐ̯ t am ˈmaɪn] ( listen); lit. ' Frankfurt
Frankfurt
on the Main'), is a metropolis and the largest city in the German state of Hesse
Hesse
and the fifth-largest city in Germany. Frankfurt
Frankfurt
was a city state, the Free City of Frankfurt, for nearly five centuries, and was one of the most important cities of the Holy Roman Empire; it lost its sovereignty in 1866. In 2015, Frankfurt
Frankfurt
has a population of 732,688 within its administrative boundaries,[4] and 2.3 million in its urban area.[2][5] The city is at the centre of the larger Frankfurt Rhine-Main Metropolitan Region, which has a population of 5.5 million[1] and is Germany's second-largest metropolitan region after Rhine-Ruhr
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DSFS
The Deutscher Sportclub für Fußballstatistiken e.V., (English: German sports club for football statistics) short DSFS is an association dedicated to collecting and publishing German football statistics, similar to the RSSSF, and is a member of the German Olympic Society. The club used to be best known for its annual publication, the Deutscher Fussball-Almanach, a yearbook on German football.[1] Unlike other yearbooks, it does not so much focus on professional football, but rather covers the higher amateur leagues.[2]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The DSFS was formed on 1 July 1971 but was only registered in 1979. It was formed by six football enthusiasts after Helmut Druwen posted an add in the kicker sport magazine looking for people interested in football statistics
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Kingdom Of Prussia
The Kingdom of Prussia
Prussia
(German: Königreich Preußen) was a German kingdom that constituted the state of Prussia
Prussia
between 1701 and 1918 and included parts of present-day Germany, Poland, Russia, Lithuania, Denmark, Belgium
Belgium
and the Czech Republic.[3] It was the driving force behind the unification of Germany
Germany
in 1871 and was the leading state of the German Empire
German Empire
until its dissolution in 1918.[3] Although it took its name from the region called Prussia, it was based in the Margraviate of Brandenburg, where its capital was Berlin. The kings of Prussia
Prussia
were from the House of Hohenzollern
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Association Football
Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer,[a] is a team sport played between two teams of eleven players with a spherical ball. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport.[3][4][5][6] The game is played on a rectangular field with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal. Players are not allowed to touch the ball with outstretched hands or arms while it is in play, unless they are goalkeepers within their penalty area. Other players mainly use their feet to strike or pass the ball, but may also use any other part of their body except the hands and the arms. The team that scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is level at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time or a penalty shootout depending on the format of the competition
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