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Noonbory And The Super Seven
Kevin Aichele (as Wangury) Brent Hirose(as Noonbory) Margaux Miller(as Jetybory) Markian Tarasuik(as Totobory) Trevor Toffan Steed Crandell (as Bakerbory)Opening theme "Noonbory and the Super Seven" (Voodoo Highway Music & Post Inc)Ending theme "Noonbory and the Super Seven" (Voodoo Highway Music & Post Inc – instrumental)Country of origin Canada South KoreaOriginal language(s) EnglishNo. of seasons 1No. of episodes 26ProductionExecutive producer(s) Wook Jung Hyun Dong Ahn Wook-Ho Ham Bul-kyung Kim Michael Hirsh Toper Taylor Pamela Slavin John VanderveldeProducer(s) Chun-Woo Lee Wolf Kim Changki Lee Jennifer PicherackRunning time Approx
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Children's Television Series
Children's television series
Children's television series
are television programs designed for and marketed to children, normally scheduled for broadcast during the morning and afternoon when children are awake. They can sometimes run during the early evening, allowing younger children to watch them after school
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Yeti
In the folklore of Nepal, the Yeti
Yeti
(/ˈjɛti/)[4] or Abominable Snowman (Nepali: हिममानव himamānav, lit. "snow man") is an ape-like entity, taller than an average human, that is said to inhabit the Himalayan region of Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet. The names Yeti
Yeti
and Meh-Teh are commonly used by the people indigenous to the region, and are part of their history and mythology
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Social Skill
A social skill is any competence facilitating interaction and communication with others where social rules and relations are created, communicated, and changed in verbal and nonverbal ways. The process of learning these skills is called socialization. For socialization, interpersonal skills are essential to relate to one another. Interpersonal skills are the interpersonal acts a person uses to interact with others, which are related to dominance vs. submission, love vs. hate, affiliation vs. aggression, and control vs. autonomy categories (Leary, 1957). Positive interpersonal skills include persuasion, active listening, delegation, and stewardship, among others. A healthy Social interest (Gemeinschaftsgefühl) that involves more than being in a group is required for well-adjusted social skills
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Memory
Memory
Memory
is the faculty of the mind by which information is encoded, stored, and retrieved. Memory
Memory
is vital to experiences and related to limbic systems, it is the retention of information over time for the purpose of influencing future action.[1] If we could not remember past events, we could not learn or develop language, relationships, nor personal identity (Eysenck, 2012). Often memory is understood as an informational processing system with explicit and implicit functioning that is made up of a sensory processor, short-term (or working) memory, and long-term memory (Baddely, 2007).[better source needed] This can be related to the neuron
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Visual Perception
Visual perception
Visual perception
is the ability to interpret the surrounding environment using light in the visible spectrum reflected by the objects in the environment. The resulting perception is also known as visual perception, eyesight, sight, or vision (adjectival form: visual, optical, or ocular)
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Olfaction
Olfaction
Olfaction
is a chemoreception that forms the sense of smell. Olfaction has many purposes, such as the detection of hazards, pheromones, and food
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Taste
Taste, gustatory perception, or gustation[1] is one of the five traditional senses that belongs to the gustatory system. Taste
Taste
is the sensation produced when a substance in the mouth reacts chemically with taste receptor cells located on taste buds in the oral cavity, mostly on the tongue. Taste, along with smell (olfaction) and trigeminal nerve stimulation (registering texture, pain, and temperature), determines flavors of food or other substances. Humans have taste receptors on taste buds (gustatory calyculi) and other areas including the upper surface of the tongue and the epiglottis.[2][3] The gustatory cortex is responsible for the perception of taste. The tongue is covered with thousands of small bumps called papillae, which are visible to the naked eye. Within each papilla are hundreds of taste buds.[4] The exception to this is the filiform papillae that do not contain taste buds
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Somatosensory System
The somatosensory system is a part of the sensory nervous system. The somatosensory system is a complex system of sensory neurons and pathways that responds to changes at the surface or inside the body. The axons (as afferent nerve fibers), of sensory neurons connect with, or respond to, various receptor cells. These sensory receptor cells are activated by different stimuli such as heat and nociception, giving a functional name to the responding sensory neuron, such as a thermoreceptor which carries information about temperature changes. Other types include mechanoreceptors, chemoreceptors, and nociceptors and they send signals along a sensory nerve to the spinal cord where they may be processed by other sensory neurons and then relayed to the brain for further processing. Sensory receptors are found all over the body including the skin, epithelial tissues, muscles, bones and joints, internal organs, and the cardiovascular system.Touch is a crucial means of receiving information
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Hearing (sense)
Hearing, or auditory perception, is the ability to perceive sounds by detecting vibrations,[1] changes in the pressure of the surrounding medium through time, through an organ such as the ear
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Nonsense
Nonsense
Nonsense
is a communication, via speech, writing, or any other symbolic system, that lacks any coherent meaning. Sometimes in ordinary usage, nonsense is synonymous with absurdity or the ridiculous. Many poets, novelists and songwriters have used nonsense in their works, often creating entire works using it for reasons ranging from pure comic amusement or satire, to illustrating a point about language or reasoning. In the philosophy of language and philosophy of science, nonsense is distinguished from sense or meaningfulness, and attempts have been made to come up with a coherent and consistent method of distinguishing sense from nonsense
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Common Sense
Common sense
Common sense
is sound practical judgment concerning everyday matters, or a basic ability to perceive, understand, and judge that is shared by ("common to") nearly all people.[1] The first type of common sense, good sense, can be described as "the knack for seeing things as they are, and doing things as they ought to be done." The second type is sometimes described as folk wisdom, "signifying unreflective knowledge not reliant on specialized training or deliberative thought." The two types are intertwined, as the person who has common sense is in touch with common-sense ideas, which emerge from
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Technicolor
Technicolor
Technicolor
is a series of color motion picture processes, the first version dating from 1916,[1] and followed by improved versions over several decades. It was the second major color process, after Britain's Kinemacolor, and the most widely used color process in Hollywood
Hollywood
from 1922 to 1952. Technicolor
Technicolor
became known and celebrated for its highly saturated color, and was initially most commonly used for filming musicals such as The Wizard of Oz (1939) and Down Argentine Way
Down Argentine Way
(1940), costume pictures such as The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) and Gone with the Wind (1939), and animated films such as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) and Fantasia (1940). As the technology matured it was also used for less spectacular dramas and comedies
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Snowball
A snowball is a spherical object made from snow, usually created by scooping snow with the hands, and compacting it into a roughly fist-sized ball. The snowball is often used to engage in games, such as snowball fights. Snowball
Snowball
fights are usually light-hearted and involve throwing snowballs at one's friends or family. The pressure exerted by the hands on the snow is a determinant for the final result. Reduced pressure leads to a light and soft snowball. Compacting humid or "packing" snow, by applying a high pressure produces a harder snowball or "iceball", which eventually can be considered harmful during a snowball fight. A snowball may also be a large ball of snow formed by rolling a smaller snowball on a snow-covered surface. The smaller snowball grows by picking up additional snow as it rolls. The terms "snowball effect", "snowballing" and "Y Gasseg Eira" are named after this process
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Slapstick
Slapstick
Slapstick
is a style of humor involving exaggerated physical activity which exceeds the boundaries of normal physical comedy.[1][2][3] The term arises from a device developed during the broad, physical comedy style known as Commedia dell'arte
Commedia dell'arte
in 16th Century Italy. The "slap stick" consists of two thin slats of wood made from splitting a single long stick, which make a 'slap' when striking another actor, with little force needed to make a loud—and comical—sound
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Black-and-white Dualism
The contrast of white and black (light and darkness, day and night) has a long tradition of metaphorical usage, traceable to the Ancient Near East, and explicitly in the Pythagorean Table of Opposites. In Western culture
Western culture
as well as in Confucianism, the contrast symbolizes the moral dichotomy of good and evil.Contents1 Description 2 Examples2.1 Religion and mythology 2.2 Dress 2.3 Magic 2.4 Popular Culture 2.5 Other Examples3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] Day, light, and good are often linked together, in opposition to night, darkness, and evil. These contrasting metaphors may go back as far as human history, and appear in many cultures, including both the ancient Chinese and the ancient Persians
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