HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Nonesuch Records
Nonesuch Records
Nonesuch Records
is an American record company and label owned by Warner Music Group, distributed by Warner Bros. Records, and based in New York City. Founded by Jac Holzman
Jac Holzman
in 1964 as a budget classical label, Nonesuch has developed into a label that records critically acclaimed music from a wide range of genres. Robert Hurwitz was president of the company from 1984 to 2017.Contents1 History1.1 Founding 1.2 1965-1979: Teresa Sterne 1.3 1984–2016: Robert Hurwitz 1.4 2017–present: David Bither2 Nonesuch Explorer Series 3 Discography 4 Artists 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Founding[edit] Nonesuch was founded in 1964 by Jac Holzman
Jac Holzman
to produce "fine records at the same price as a trade paperback",[1] which would be half the price of a normal LP
[...More...]

"Nonesuch Records" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Blue Thumb Records
Blue Thumb Records was an American record label founded in 1968 by Bob Krasnow, along with former A&M Records executives Tommy LiPuma and Don Graham. Blue Thumb's last record was released in 1978.Contents1 History 2 Catalog 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Bob Krasnow had been in the record business for a number of years, working as a promotion man for King Records and also working for Buddah/Kama Sutra Records. Blue Thumb was originally intended to be the name of Captain Beefheart's band, but Krasnow did not think the name was right for the group
[...More...]

"Blue Thumb Records" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pulitzer Prize For Music
The Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Music is one of the seven American Pulitzer Prizes that are annually awarded for Letters, Drama, and Music. It was first awarded in 1943. Joseph Pulitzer
Joseph Pulitzer
did not call for such a prize in his will, but had arranged for a music scholarship to be awarded each year
[...More...]

"Pulitzer Prize For Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Federico García Lorca
Federico del Sagrado Corazón de Jesús García Lorca,[1] known as Federico García Lorca[n 1] (Spanish pronunciation: [feðeˈɾiko ɣarˈθi.a ˈlorka]; 5 June 1898 – 19 August 1936) was a Spanish poet, playwright, and theatre director. García Lorca achieved international recognition as an emblematic member of the Generation of '27, a group consisting of mostly poets who introduced the tenets of European movements (such as symbolism, futurism, and surrealism) into Spanish literature.[2][3] He was executed by Nationalist forces at the beginning of the Spanish Civil War.[4][5][6][7][8] His body has never been found. In 2008, a Spanish judge opened an investigation into Lorca's death
[...More...]

"Federico García Lorca" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ancient Voices Of Children
Ancient Voices of Children is a composition by the American composer George Crumb. Written in 1970, the work is scored for soprano, boy soprano, oboe, mandolin, harp, amplified piano (and toy piano), and percussion (three players), and was commissioned by the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation. Ancient Voices of Children is subtitled “A Cycle of Songs on Texts by Federico García Lorca.” The piece was premiered at the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in Washington, D.C, on October 31, 1970, as part of the Coolidge Foundation's 14th Festival of Chamber Music
[...More...]

"Ancient Voices Of Children" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Grammy Award For Best Contemporary Folk Album
The Grammy Award
Grammy Award
for Best Contemporary Folk Album was awarded from 1987 to 2011. Until 1993 the award was known as the Grammy Award
Grammy Award
for Best Contemporary Folk Recording. In 2007, this category was renamed Best Contemporary Folk/Americana Album. As of 2010 the category was split into two categories; Best Contemporary Folk Album and Best Americana Album. An award for Best Traditional Folk Album was also presented. Prior to 1987 contemporary and traditional folk were combined as the Best Ethnic or Traditional Folk Recording. Following the 2011 Grammy Award
Grammy Award
ceremony, the award was discontinued due to a major overhaul of Grammy categories
[...More...]

"Grammy Award For Best Contemporary Folk Album" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Beaver & Krause
Beaver & Krause were a musical duo made up of Paul Beaver and Bernie Krause. Their 1967 album The Nonesuch Guide to Electronic Music was a pioneering work in the electronic music genre.[citation needed] Beaver introduced Monkees singer-drummer Micky Dolenz
Micky Dolenz
to the Moog, which became a featured instrument on the fourth Monkees album, Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd., and Beaver himself performed on one track, "Star Collector" in 1967. In addition, he led workshops at the Beaver & Krause LA studio attended by film composers and session keyboardists. In June 1967, Beaver and Krause set up a booth at the Monterey Pop Festival, demonstrating their newly purchased electronic synthesiser, one of the first constructed by Bob Moog
[...More...]

"Beaver & Krause" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Moog Synthesizer
Moog synthesizer
Moog synthesizer
(pronounced /moʊɡ/ MOHG; often anglicized to /muːɡ/ MOOG, though Robert Moog
Robert Moog
preferred the former[2]) may refer to any number of analog synthesizers designed by Robert Moog
Robert Moog
or manufactured by Moog Music, and is commonly used as a generic term for older-generation analog music synthesizers. The Moog company pioneered the commercial manufacture of modular voltage-controlled analog synthesizer systems in the mid 1960s
[...More...]

"Moog Synthesizer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aaron Copland
Aaron Copland
Aaron Copland
(/ˌærən ˈkoʊplənd/;[1][2] November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer, composition teacher, writer, and later a conductor of his own and other American music. Copland was referred to by his peers and critics as "the Dean of American Composers." The open, slowly changing harmonies in much of his music are typical of what many people consider to be the sound of American music, evoking the vast American landscape and pioneer spirit. He is best known for the works he wrote in the 1930s and 1940s in a deliberately accessible style often referred to as "populist" and which the composer labeled his "vernacular" style.[3] Works in this vein include the ballets Appalachian Spring, Billy the Kid and Rodeo, his Fanfare for the Common Man
Fanfare for the Common Man
and Third Symphony
[...More...]

"Aaron Copland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

ECM Records
ECM (Edition of Contemporary Music) is an independent record label founded by Manfred Eicher in Munich
Munich
in 1969. While ECM is best known for jazz music, the label has released a variety of recordings, and ECM's artists often refuse to acknowledge boundaries between genres. ECM's motto is "the Most Beautiful Sound Next to Silence", according to a 1971 review of ECM releases in CODA, a Canadian jazz magazine.[1] ECM has been distributed in the U.S. by Warner Bros. Records, PolyGram Records, BMG, and, since 1999, Universal Music, the successor of PolyGram. Its album covers have been profiled in two books: Sleeves of Desire and Windfall Light, both published by Lars Müller.Contents1 History 2 ECM and film 3 Discography 4 Record label of the year award 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The first ECM release was pianist Mal Waldron's 1969 recording Free at Last
[...More...]

"ECM Records" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Warner Communications
Warner Communications, Inc. was established in 1972 when Kinney National Company spun off its non-entertainment assets due to a financial scandal over its parking operations[1] (as National Kinney Corporation), and changed its name. History[edit] It was the parent company for Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Pictures and Warner Music Group. It also owned DC Comics
DC Comics
and Mad magazine. Warner made (and later lost) considerable profits with Atari, Inc., which it owned from 1976 to 1984. In 1979, Warner formed a joint venture with credit card company American Express, Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, which owned such cable channels as MTV, Nickelodeon, and The Movie Channel
[...More...]

"Warner Communications" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

The Desert Music
The Desert Music is a work of music for voices and orchestra composed by the minimalist composer Steve Reich. It is based on texts by William Carlos Williams and takes its title from his poetry anthology The Desert Music and Other Poems. The composition consists of five movements, and in both its tempi and arrangement of thematic material, the piece is in a characteristic arch form (ABCBA)
[...More...]

"The Desert Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Baroque Music
Baroque
Baroque
music (US: /bəˈroʊk/ or UK: /bəˈrɒk/) is a style of Western art music
Western art music
composed from approximately 1600 to 1750.[1] This era followed the Renaissance music
Renaissance music
era, and was followed in turn by the Classical era. Baroque
Baroque
music forms a major portion of the "classical music" canon, and is now widely studied, performed, and listened to
[...More...]

"Baroque Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chamber Music
Chamber music
Chamber music
is a form of classical music that is composed for a small group of instruments—traditionally a group that could fit in a palace chamber or a large room. Most broadly, it includes any art music that is performed by a small number of performers, with one performer to a part (in contrast to orchestral music, in which each string part is played by a number of performers). However, by convention, it usually does not include solo instrument performances. Because of its intimate nature, chamber music has been described as "the music of friends".[1] For more than 100 years, chamber music was played primarily by amateur musicians in their homes, and even today, when chamber music performance has migrated from the home to the concert hall, many musicians, amateur and professional, still play chamber music for their own pleasure
[...More...]

"Chamber Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Classical Music
Classical music
Classical music
is art music produced or rooted in the traditions of Western culture, including both liturgical (religious) and secular music. While a more precise term is also used to refer to the period from 1750 to 1820 (the Classical period), this article is about the broad span of time from before the 6th century AD to the present day, which includes the Classical period and various other periods.[1] The central norms of this tradition became codified between 1550 and 1900, which is known as the common-practice period
[...More...]

"Classical Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wayne Horvitz
Wayne Horvitz
Wayne Horvitz
(born 1955) is an American composer, keyboardist and record producer[1] He came to prominence in the Downtown scene
Downtown scene
of 1980s and '90s New York City, noted for working with John Zorn's Naked City among others. Horvitz has since relocated to the Seattle, Washington area where he has several ongoing groups and has worked as an adjunct professor of composition at Cornish College of the Arts.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Discography2.1 Leader 2.2 Co-leader 2.3 As sideman 2.4 Composer3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Horvitz, a "defiant cross-breeder of genres",[3] has led the groups The President, Pigpen, Zony Mash, and the Four Plus One Ensemble
[...More...]

"Wayne Horvitz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.