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Noah
In the Abrahamic religions, Noah[a] (/ˈnoʊ.ə/ NOH-ə)[1][2] was the tenth and last of the pre-Flood Patriarchs. The story of Noah's Ark
Noah's Ark
is told in the Bible's Genesis flood narrative. The biblical account is followed by the story of the Curse of Ham. In addition to the Book of Genesis, Noah
Noah
is mentioned in the Old Testament in the First Book of Chronicles, and the books of Tobit, Wisdom, Sirach, Isaiah, Ezekiel, 2 Esdras, 4 Maccabees; in the New Testament, he is mentioned in the gospels of Matthew, and Luke, the Epistle to the Hebrews, 1st Peter and 2nd Peter
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Husbandman
A husbandman in England
England
in the medieval and early modern period was a free tenant farmer or small landowner. The social status of a husbandman was below that of a yeoman. The meaning of "husband" in this term is "master of house" rather than "married man". It has also been used to mean a practitioner of animal husbandry, or in perhaps more modern language, a rancher. Origin and etymology[edit] The term husband refers to Middle English
Middle English
huseband, from Old English hūsbōnda, from Old Norse
Old Norse
hūsbōndi (hūs, "house" + bōndi, būandi, present participle of būa, "to dwell", so, etymologically, "a householder").[1] References[edit]^ American Heritage Dictionary on "husband"External links[edit]J.P. Somerville, Social StructureThis history article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis England-related article is a stub
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Books Of Chronicles
In the Christian Bible, the two Books of Chronicles
Books of Chronicles
(commonly referred to as 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles, or First Chronicles and Second Chronicles) generally follow the two Books of Kings
Books of Kings
and precede Ezra–Nehemiah, thus concluding the history-oriented books of the Old Testament,[1] often referred to as the Deuteronomistic history. In the Hebrew Bible, Chronicles is a single book, called Diḇrê Hayyāmîm (Hebrew: דִּבְרֵי־הַיָּמִים‬, "The Matters [of] the Days"), and is the final book of Ketuvim, the third and last part of the Tanakh
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Sura 21
Sūrat al-Anbiyāʼ (Arabic: سورة الأنبياء‎, "The Prophets")[1] is the 21st sura (or chapter) of the Qur'an
Qur'an
with 112 ayat. It is a Makkan sura. Its principal subject matter is prophets of the past, who also preached the same faith as Muhammad.Contents1 Historical context 2 Structure and content 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistorical context[edit] This sura was revealed in the Second Meccan Period and is listed as Number 65 according to the Nöldeke Chronology. Within its verses are found numerous evocations of earlier Judeo-Christian prophets. These examples help to emphasize and define Muhammad's role as a messenger within the Qur'anic context
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Second Epistle Of Peter
The Second Epistle
Epistle
of Peter, often referred to as Second Peter and written 2 Peter or in Roman numerals
Roman numerals
II Peter (especially in older references), is a book of the New Testament
New Testament
of the Bible, traditionally held to have been written by Saint Peter. Some scholars think Peter used an amanuensis, or secretary, to write the epistle.[1]Contents1 Composition 2 Canonical acceptance 3 Content 4 Audience 5 Outline 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External links9.1 Online translations of the epistle 9.2 OtherComposition[edit] See also: Authorship of the Petrine epistles According to the Epistle
Epistle
itself, it was composed by the Apostle Peter, an eyewitness to Jesus' ministry. It criticizes "false teachers" who distort the authentic, apostolic tradition, and predicts judgment for them
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Daniel Maclise
Daniel Maclise
Daniel Maclise
RA (25 January 1806 – 25 April 1870) was an Irish history, literary and portrait painter, and illustrator, who worked for most of his life in London, England.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Posthumous exhibitions3.1 National Portrait Gallery, 1972 3.2 Crawford Municipal Art Gallery, 2008 3.3 Royal Academy, 20154 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Maclise was born in Cork, Ireland, the son of Alexander McLish (also known as McLeish, McLish, McClisse or McLise), a tanner or shoemaker, but formerly a Scottish Highlander soldier. His education was of the plainest kind, but he was eager for culture, fond of reading, and anxious to become an artist. His father, however, placed him in employment, in 1820, in Newenham's Bank, where he remained for two years, before leaving to study at the Cork School of Art
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Gospel Of Luke
The Gospel
Gospel
According to Luke (Greek: Τὸ κατὰ Λουκᾶν εὐαγγέλιον, to kata Loukan evangelion), also called the Gospel
Gospel
of Luke, or simply Luke, is the third of the four canonical Gospels. It tells of the origins, birth, ministry, atonement, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus
Jesus
Christ.[1] Luke is the longest of the four gospels and the longest book in the New Testament
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Gospel Of Matthew
The Gospel
Gospel
According to Matthew (Greek: Τὸ κατὰ Ματθαῖον εὐαγγέλιον, translit. Tò katà Matthaīon euangélion; also called the Gospel
Gospel
of Matthew or simply, Matthew) is the first book of the New Testament
New Testament
and one of the three synoptic gospels
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New Testament
The New Testament
New Testament
(Greek: Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Latin: Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament
New Testament
discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians
Christians
regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The New Testament
New Testament
(in whole or in part) has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity
Christianity
around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology
Christian theology
and morality
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4 Maccabees
The book of 4 Maccabees
4 Maccabees
is a homily or philosophic discourse praising the supremacy of pious reason over passion. It is not in the Bible
Bible
for most churches, but is an appendix to the Greek Bible, and in the canon of the Georgian Orthodox Bible.[citation needed] It was included in the 1688 Romanian Orthodox and the 18th-century Romanian Catholic Bibles where it was called "Iosip" (Joseph). It is no longer printed in Romanian Bibles today.Contents1 Synopsis 2 Authorship and criticism 3 Doctrinal content 4 References 5 External linksSynopsis[edit] The work consists of a prologue and two main sections; the first advances the philosophical thesis while the second illustrates the points made using examples drawn from 2 Maccabees
2 Maccabees
(principally, the martyrdom of Eleazer and the Maccabeean youths) under Antiochus IV Epiphanes
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2 Esdras
2 Esdras (also called 4 Esdras, Latin
Latin
Esdras, or Latin
Latin
Ezra) is the name of an apocalyptic book in many English versions of the Bible[1] (see Naming conventions below).[2][3] Its authorship is ascribed to Ezra.[4] It is reckoned among the apocrypha by Roman Catholics, Protestants, and most Eastern Orthodox Christians.[5] Although Second Esdras was preserved in Latin
Latin
as an appendix to the Vulgate
Vulgate
and passed down as a unified book, it is generally considered to be a tripartite work.Contents1 Naming conventions 2 Contents2.1 5 Ezra 2.2 4 Ezra 2.3 6 Ezra3 Author and criticism 4 Usage 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksNaming conventions[edit] Main article: Esdras § Naming conventions As with 1 Esdras, there is some confusion about the numbering of this book
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Book Of Ezekiel
The Book
Book
of Ezekiel
Ezekiel
is the third of the Latter Prophets in the Tanakh and one of the major prophetic books in the Old Testament, following Isaiah and Jeremiah.[1] According to the book itself, it records six visions of the prophet Ezekiel, exiled in Babylon, during the 22 years 593–571 BC, although it is the product of a long and complex history and does not necessarily preserve the very words of the prophet.[2] The visions, and the book, are structured around three themes: (1) Judgment on Israel
Israel
(chapters 1–24); (2) Judgment on the nations (chapters 25–32); and (3) Future blessings for Israel
Israel
(chapters 33–48).[3] Its themes include the concepts of the presence of God, purity, Israel
Israel
as a divine community, and individual responsibility to God
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Sirach
The Book
Book
of the All-Virtuous Wisdom of Yeshua ben Sira,[1] commonly called the Wisdom of Sirach
Sirach
/ˈsaɪræk/ or simply Sirach, and also known as the Book
Book
of Ecclesiasticus /ɪˌkliːziˈæstɪkəs/ (abbreviated Ecclus.)[2] or Ben Sira,[3] is a work of ethical teachings, from approximately 200 to 175 BCE, written by the Jewish scribe Ben Sira
Ben Sira
of Jerusalem, on the inspiration of his father Joshua son of Sirach, sometimes called Jesus
Jesus
son of Sirach
Sirach
or Yeshua ben Eliezer ben Sira. In Egypt, it was translated into Greek by the author's unnamed grandson, who added a prologue
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Book Of Wisdom
The Wisdom of Solomon
Solomon
or Book
Book
of Wisdom is a Jewish work, written in Greek, composed in Alexandria
Alexandria
(Egypt). Generally dated to the 2nd century BCE, the central theme of the work is "Wisdom" itself, appearing under two principal aspects. In its relation to man, Wisdom is the perfection of knowledge of the righteous as a gift from God showing itself in action
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Book Of Tobit
The Book
Book
of Tobit (/ˈtoʊbɪt/)[a] is a book of scripture that is part of the Catholic and Orthodox biblical canons, pronounced canonical by the Council of Hippo
Council of Hippo
(in 393),
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Mosaic
A mosaic is a piece of art or image made from the assemblage of small pieces of colored glass, stone, or other materials. It is often used in decorative art or as interior decoration. Most mosaics are made of small, flat, roughly square, pieces of stone or glass of different colors, known as tesserae. Some, especially floor mosaics, are made of small rounded pieces of stone, and called "pebble mosaics". Mosaics have a long history, starting in Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the 3rd millennium BC. Pebble mosaics were made in Tiryns
Tiryns
in Mycenean Greece; mosaics with patterns and pictures became widespread in classical times, both in Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
and Ancient Rome. Early Christian basilicas from the 4th century onwards were decorated with wall and ceiling mosaics
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