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No. 25 Maintenance Unit RAF
The following is a list of Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
Maintenance Units (MU). The majority of MU's started out as Aircraft Storage Units (ASU)s.Contents1 Maintenance units1.1 No. 1 MU – No. 100 MU 1.2 No. 101 MU – No. 200 MU 1.3 No. 201 MU – No. 300 MU 1.4 No. 301 MU – No. 400 MU 1.5 No. 401 MU – No. 500 MU 1.6 No. 1 (India) MU – No. 10 (India) MU2 See also 3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 Bibliography3.2.1 Action StationsMaintenance units[edit] No. 1 MU – No. 100 MU[edit]Name Airfields used Equipment serviced NotesNo. 1 MU RAF Kidbrooke
RAF Kidbrooke
between 9 April 1938 and 15 February 1947. Repair Depot DisbandedNo. 1 Heavy Glider MU RAF Netheravon
RAF Netheravon
between May 1943 and June 1946. Repair Depot DisbandedNo
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RAF Kidbrooke
RAF Kidbrooke
Kidbrooke
was a Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
base, situated in Kidbrooke
Kidbrooke
in south-east London, in the Royal Borough of Greenwich. The site was operational from 1917 to 1965 and was mainly used as a stores, maintenance and training facility.Contents1 History1.1 Wartime murder2 The site today 3 Notes 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Established in 1917, the facility was initially a Royal Flying Corps storage depot, situated on both sides of the railway line close to Kidbrooke
Kidbrooke
railway station.[1] In 1917, several large storage warehouses and offices were constructed, that stretched for 1,000 yards (910 m) alongside both sides of the line, served by sidings and an extensive 2 ft (610 mm) gauge network.[2][note 1] The RFC became the RAF on 1 January 1918. Kidbrooke
Kidbrooke
was named No 1 Stores Depot in March 1920
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Vickers Wellington
The Vickers Wellington
Vickers Wellington
was a British twin-engined, long-range medium bomber. It was designed during the mid-1930s at Brooklands
Brooklands
in Weybridge, Surrey, led by Vickers-Armstrongs' chief designer Rex Pierson; a key feature of the aircraft is its geodetic airframe fuselage structure, principally designed by Barnes Wallis. Development had been started in response to Air Ministry
Air Ministry
Specification B.9/32; issued in the middle of 1932, this called for a twin-engined day bomber capable of delivering higher performance than any previous design. Other aircraft developed to the same specification include the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley
Armstrong Whitworth Whitley
and the Handley Page Hampden
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Bristol Blenheim
The Bristol Blenheim
Bristol Blenheim
is a British light bomber aircraft designed and built by the Bristol Aeroplane Company
Bristol Aeroplane Company
(Bristol) which was used extensively in the first two years and in some cases throughout the Second World War. The aircraft was developed as Type 142, a civil airliner, in response to a challenge from Lord Rothermere to produce the fastest commercial aircraft in Europe. The Type 142 first flew in April 1935, and the Air Ministry, impressed by its performance, ordered a modified design as the Type 142M for the Royal Air Force (RAF) as a bomber. Deliveries of the newly named Blenheim to RAF squadrons commenced on 10 March 1937. A development of the Type 142M was the Type 149 which Bristol named the Bolingbroke, retrospectively changed by the Air Ministry
Air Ministry
to Blenheim Mk IV and the Type 142M to the Blenheim Mk I
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Handley Page Hampden
The Handley Page
Handley Page
HP.52 Hampden was a British twin-engine medium bomber of the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF). It was one of a trio of then-large twin-engine bombers procured for the RAF, the other two being the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley
Armstrong Whitworth Whitley
and Vickers
Vickers
Wellington
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Supermarine Spitfire
The Supermarine
Supermarine
Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft used by the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
and other Allied countries before, during and after World War II. Many variants of the Spitfire were built, using several wing configurations, and it was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter produced continuously throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be popular among enthusiasts; about 54 remain airworthy, and many more are static exhibits in aviation museums throughout the world. The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works, which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928
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Fairey Battle
The Fairey Battle
Fairey Battle
was a British single-engine light bomber designed and manufactured by the Fairey Aviation Company. It was developed during the mid-1930s for the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) as a monoplane successor to the earlier Hawker Hart
Hawker Hart
and Hind biplanes. The Battle was powered by the same high-performance Rolls-Royce Merlin
Rolls-Royce Merlin
piston engine that powered various contemporary British fighters[N 1]. However the Battle was significantly heavier, with its three-man crew and bomb load. Though a great improvement over the aircraft that preceded it, the Battle was relatively slow and limited in range
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RAF Quedgeley
RAF Quedgeley was a Royal Air Force station near Quedgeley, Gloucestershire.Contents1 History 2 Current use 3 See also 4 References4.1 Citations5 External linksHistory[edit] The site was first occupied in 1914. It closed as an independent RAF unit on 13 February 1995. As of 1915 part of the site was the No 5 National Filling Factory[1] which supplied ammunition during the First World War. At one point 6364 people, mainly women, were employed at the site. The factory produced over 10.5 million 14" and 16" shells, 7 million cartridges and 23 million fuses and other components. The buildings were demolished between 1924 and 1926. In World War II, No. 7 Maintenance Unit, RAF Quedgeley was opened on 15 April 1939 as a storage and maintenance site for aircraft equipment and motor vehicles
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RAF Bibury
RAF Bibury is a former Royal Air Force station located north east of Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England.Contents1 History 2 RAF units 3 See also 4 References4.1 Citations 4.2 BibliographyHistory[edit] The airfield was built in 1939 for use as a relief landing ground for training aircraft from nearby RAF South Cerney. In the Battle of Britain the airfield was used to base detachments of fighter aircraft.[1] Hawker Hurricanes of 87 Squadron arrived on detachment in August 1940. They were replaced by a detachment from 92 Squadron with the Supermarine Spitfire until September when the 87 Squadron detachment returned until the end of the year.[1] During the Battle of Britain the airfield had very few buildings and a grass runway.[1] The airfield was not used for flying after 1944 and was the base of a maintenance unit until it closed in 1945. RAF units[edit]Unit Dates Aircraft Variant NotesNo
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RAF Little Rissington
RAF Little Rissington
RAF Little Rissington
(ICAO: EGVL) is an RAF aerodrome and former RAF station in Gloucestershire, England. It was once home to the Central Flying School, the Vintage Pair and the Red Arrows. Built during the 1930s, the station was opened in 1938 and closed in 1994. The married-quarters and main technical site were sold in 1996 (the former becoming the village of Upper Rissington). Although no longer an RAF station, the aerodrome has been retained by the Ministry of Defence and is known as Little Rissington Airfield. It remains active along with the southern technical sites, under the operational control of HQ No. 2 Flying Training School RAF
No. 2 Flying Training School RAF
at RAF Syerston. It is now home to No. 637 Volunteer Gliding Squadron RAF
No

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RAF Cosford
Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
Cosford or RAF Cosford
RAF Cosford
(formerly DCAE Cosford)[1] (I
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No. 30 Satellite Landing Ground
The following is a list of Satellite Landing Grounds (SLG). A Satellite Landing Ground is typically an airfield with one or two grass runways which is designed throughout to be "hidden" from the sky by using woods and other natural features to hide the presence of aircraft and associated buildings. The landing grounds were mainly used by Royal Air Force maintenance units which used the areas to disperse aircraft to reduce the likelihood of attacks from the air. Some improvements and upgrades to aircraft were performed at these sites but overall it was kept to a minimum. Some support buildings came about by using requisitioned buildings on the land. A satellite station is NOT the same as a Satellite Landing Ground.The former No. 5 SLG BerrowOpen land on the former site of No. 5 SLG BerrowSite 1 of the former No. 15 SLG BodorganThe Watch Office at the former No
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No. 33 Satellite Landing Ground
The following is a list of Satellite Landing Grounds (SLG). A Satellite Landing Ground is typically an airfield with one or two grass runways which is designed throughout to be "hidden" from the sky by using woods and other natural features to hide the presence of aircraft and associated buildings. The landing grounds were mainly used by Royal Air Force maintenance units which used the areas to disperse aircraft to reduce the likelihood of attacks from the air. Some improvements and upgrades to aircraft were performed at these sites but overall it was kept to a minimum. Some support buildings came about by using requisitioned buildings on the land. A satellite station is NOT the same as a Satellite Landing Ground.The former No. 5 SLG BerrowOpen land on the former site of No. 5 SLG BerrowSite 1 of the former No. 15 SLG BodorganThe Watch Office at the former No
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Avro Anson
The Avro
Avro
Anson is a British twin-engined, multi-role aircraft built by aircraft manufacturer Avro. Large numbers of the type served in a variety of roles for the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF), Fleet Air Arm
Fleet Air Arm
(FAA), Royal Canadian Air Force
Royal Canadian Air Force
(RCAF) and numerous other air forces before, during, and after the Second World War. Initially known as the Avro
Avro
652A, the Anson was developed during the mid-1930s from the earlier Avro
Avro
652 airliner in response to a request for tenders issued by the British Air Ministry
Air Ministry
for a maritime reconnaissance aircraft. Having suitably impressed the Ministry, a single prototype was ordered, which conducted its maiden flight on 24 March 1935
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Airspeed Oxford
The Airspeed AS.10 Oxford was a twin-engine monoplane aircraft developed and manufactured by Airspeed. It saw widespread use for training British Commonwealth aircrews in navigation, radio-operating, bombing and gunnery roles throughout the Second World War. The Oxford was developed by Airspeed during the 1930s in response to a requirement for a capable trainer aircraft that conformed with Specification T.23/36, which had been issued by the British Air Ministry. Its basic design is derived from the company's earlier AS.6 Envoy, a commercial passenger aircraft. Performing its maiden flight on 19 June 1937, it was rapidly put into production as part of a rapid expansion of the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) in anticipation of a large-scale conflict. As a consequence of the outbreak of war, many thousands of Oxfords would be ordered by Britain and its allies, including Australia, Canada, France, New Zealand, Poland, and the United States
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Supermarine Spitfires
The Supermarine
Supermarine
Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft used by the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
and other Allied countries before, during and after World War II. Many variants of the Spitfire were built, using several wing configurations, and it was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter produced continuously throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be popular among enthusiasts; about 54 remain airworthy, and many more are static exhibits in aviation museums throughout the world. The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works, which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928
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