HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Nikon F6
The Nikon
Nikon
F6 is a 35 mm film single-lens reflex camera body that became commercially available during 2004, and is the sixth top-of-the-line professional film camera in Nikon's line since the introduction of the Nikon F
Nikon F
in 1959.[1] The Nikon
Nikon
F6 is designed by Nikon
Nikon
and manufactured at their Sendai Plant.[2] The F6 is the current model of Nikon's F series and it is still in production.[3] It replaces the Nikon
Nikon
F5, manufactured from 1996 to 2004
[...More...]

"Nikon F6" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nikon D2X
The Nikon
Nikon
D2X is a 12.4-megapixel professional digital single-lens reflex camera (DSLR) that Nikon Corporation
Nikon Corporation
announced on September 16, 2004. The D2X was the high-resolution flagship in Nikon's DSLR line until June 2006 when it was supplanted by the D2Xs and, in time, the Nikon D3
Nikon D3
range, Nikon D4
Nikon D4
range and Nikon
Nikon
D5 — the latter three using a FX full-format sensor.Contents1 Technology 2 Audience 3 Competition 4 Nikon
Nikon
D2Xs 5 Sample 6 ReferencesTechnology[edit] The D2X uses a DX-format CMOS
CMOS
sensor supplied by Sony
Sony
instead of either a charge-coupled device or the Nikon
Nikon
proprietary LBCAST sensor which had both dominated Nikon's digital SLR lineup until the D2X. The camera supports the sYCC color space
[...More...]

"Nikon D2X" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Focal-plane Shutter
In camera design, a focal-plane shutter (FPS) is a type of photographic shutter that is positioned immediately in front of the focal plane of the camera, that is, right in front of the photographic film or image sensor.Contents1 Two-curtain shutters 2 Vertical-travel shutters 3 Advantages 4 Disadvantages 5 Electro-optical shutters 6 The rotary focal-plane shutter 7 The revolving drum focal-plane shutter 8 History and technical development8.1 The single-curtain focal-plane shutter 8.2 The Leica-type dual-curtain focal-plane shutter 8.3 The Square-type metal-bladed focal-plane shutter 8.4 The quest for higher speed 8.5 The electronically controlled focal-plane shutter 8.6 Breaking the X-sync
[...More...]

"Focal-plane Shutter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Target Audience
A target audience is the intended audience or readership of a publication, advertisement, or other message. In marketing and advertising, it is a particular group of consumers within the predetermined target market, identified as the targets or recipients for a particular advertisement or message.[1] Businesses that have a wide target market will focus on a specific target audience for certain messages to send, such as The Body Shops Mother's Day advertisements, which were aimed at the children and spouses of women, rather than the whole market which would have included the women themselves.[1] A target audience is formed from the same factors as a target market, but it is more specific, and is susceptible to influence from other factors
[...More...]

"Target Audience" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Digital SLR
A digital single-lens reflex camera (also called a digital SLR or DSLR) is a digital camera that combines the optics and the mechanisms of a single-lens reflex camera with a digital imaging sensor, as opposed to photographic film. The reflex design scheme is the primary difference between a DSLR
DSLR
and other digital cameras. In the reflex design, light travels through the lens, then to a mirror that alternates to send the image to either the viewfinder or the image sensor. The traditional alternative would be to have a viewfinder with its own lens, hence the term "single lens" for this design
[...More...]

"Digital SLR" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pentaprism
A pentaprism is a five-sided reflecting prism used to deviate a beam of light by a constant 90°, even if the entry beam is not at 90° to the prism. The beam reflects inside the prism twice,[1] allowing the transmission of an image through a right angle without inverting it (that is, without changing the image's handedness) as an ordinary right-angle prism or mirror would. The reflections inside the prism are not caused by total internal reflection, since the beams are incident at an angle less than the critical angle (the minimum angle for total internal reflection). Instead, the two faces are coated to provide mirror surfaces. The two opposite transmitting faces are often coated with an antireflection coating to reduce spurious reflections
[...More...]

"Pentaprism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Single Lens Reflex
A single-lens reflex camera (SLR) is a camera that typically uses a mirror and prism system (hence "reflex" from the mirror's reflection) that permits the photographer to view through the lens and see exactly what will be captured. With twin lens reflex and rangefinder cameras, the viewed image could be significantly different from the final image
[...More...]

"Single Lens Reflex" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Flash Memory
Flash memory
Flash memory
is an electronic (solid-state) non-volatile computer storage medium that can be electrically erased and reprogrammed. Toshiba
Toshiba
developed flash memory from E EPROM
EPROM
(electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) in the early 1980s and introduced it to the market in 1984. The two main types of flash memory are named after the NAND and NOR logic gates. The individual flash memory cells exhibit internal characteristics similar to those of the corresponding gates. While EPROMs had to be completely erased before being rewritten, NAND-type flash memory may be written and read in blocks (or pages) which are generally much smaller than the entire device
[...More...]

"Flash Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Intervalometer
An intervalometer is a device which counts intervals of time. Such devices commonly are used to signal, in accurate time intervals, the operation of some other device. For instance, an intervalometer might activate something every 30 seconds. Other names include interval meter and interval timer.J.P. Seeburg B-2 IntervalometerContents1 Photography 2 Military application 3 Home 4 ReferencesPhotography[edit] See also: Time-lapse
Time-lapse
photographyAn intervalometer for a reconnaissance camera on a Douglas A-26 Invader aircraftIn photography, intervalometers are used to trigger exposures. This is often done for a time-lapse series
[...More...]

"Intervalometer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Thixomolding
Semi-solid metal casting (SSM) is a near net shape variant of die casting.[1] The process is used with non-ferrous metals, such as aluminium, copper,[2] and magnesium. The process combines the advantages of casting and forging. The process is named after the fluid property thixotropy, which is the phenomenon that allows this process to work. Simply, thixotropic fluids shear when the material flows, but thicken when standing.[3] The potential for this type of process was first recognized in the early 1970s.[3] There are four different processes: thixocasting, rheocasting, thixomolding, and SIMA. SSM is done at a temperature that puts the metal between its liquidus and solidus temperature
[...More...]

"Thixomolding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Magnesium Alloy
Magnesium
Magnesium
alloys are mixtures of magnesium with other metals (called an alloy), often aluminum, zinc, manganese, silicon, copper, rare earths and zirconium. Magnesium
Magnesium
is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium
Magnesium
alloys have a hexagonal lattice structure, which affects the fundamental properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation
Plastic deformation
of the hexagonal lattice is more complicated than in cubic latticed metals like aluminium, copper and steel; therefore, magnesium alloys are typically used as cast alloys, but research of wrought alloys has been more extensive since 2003
[...More...]

"Magnesium Alloy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aluminium Alloy
Aluminium
Aluminium
alloys (or aluminum alloys; see spelling differences) are alloys in which aluminium (Al) is the predominant metal. The typical alloying elements are copper, magnesium, manganese, silicon, tin and zinc. There are two principal classifications, namely casting alloys and wrought alloys, both of which are further subdivided into the categories heat-treatable and non-heat-treatable. About 85% of aluminium is used for wrought products, for example rolled plate, foils and extrusions. Cast aluminium alloys yield cost-effective products due to the low melting point, although they generally have lower tensile strengths than wrought alloys. The most important cast aluminium alloy system is Al–Si, where the high levels of silicon (4.0–13%) contribute to give good casting characteristics
[...More...]

"Aluminium Alloy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Die Casting
Die casting
Die casting
is a metal casting process that is characterized by forcing molten metal under high pressure into a mold cavity. The mold cavity is created using two hardened tool steel dies which have been machined into shape and work similarly to an injection mold during the process. Most die castings are made from non-ferrous metals, specifically zinc, copper, aluminium, magnesium, lead, pewter and tin-based alloys
[...More...]

"Die Casting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kevlar
Kevlar
Kevlar
is the registered trademark for a para-aramid synthetic fiber, related to other aramids such as Nomex
Nomex
and Technora. Developed by Stephanie Kwolek
Stephanie Kwolek
at DuPont
DuPont
in 1965,[1][2][3] this high-strength material was first commercially used in the early 1970s as a replacement for steel in racing tires. Typically it is spun into ropes or fabric sheets that can be used as such or as an ingredient in composite material components. Kevlar
Kevlar
has many applications, ranging from bicycle tires and racing sails to bulletproof vests, because of its high tensile strength-to-weight ratio; by this measure it is 5 times stronger than steel.[2] It is also used to make modern drumheads that withstand high impact
[...More...]

"Kevlar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Single-lens Reflex Camera
A single-lens reflex camera (SLR) is a camera that typically uses a mirror and prism system (hence "reflex" from the mirror's reflection) that permits the photographer to view through the lens and see exactly what will be captured. With twin lens reflex and rangefinder cameras, the viewed image could be significantly different from the final image
[...More...]

"Single-lens Reflex Camera" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dimension
In physics and mathematics, the dimension of a mathematical space (or object) is informally defined as the minimum number of coordinates needed to specify any point within it.[1][2] Thus a line has a dimension of one because only one coordinate is needed to specify a point on it – for example, the point at 5 on a number line. A surface such as a plane or the surface of a cylinder or sphere has a dimension of two because two coordinates are needed to specify a point on it – for example, both a latitude and longitude are required to locate a point on the surface of a sphere. The inside of a cube, a cylinder or a sphere is three-dimensional because three coordinates are needed to locate a point within these spaces. In classical mechanics, space and time are different categories and refer to absolute space and time. That conception of the world is a four-dimensional space but not the one that was found necessary to describe electromagnetism
[...More...]

"Dimension" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.