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Nikolaus Pevsner
Sir Nikolaus Bernhard Leon Pevsner CBE
CBE
FBA (30 January 1902 – 18 August 1983) was a German, later British scholar of the history of art, and especially that of architecture. Pevsner is best known for his 46-volume series of county-by-county guides, The Buildings of England (1951–74), often simply referred to by his surname.Contents1 Life 2 Second World War 3 Postwar 4 Death 5 Notable ideas and theories 6 Archive 7 Publications 8 Note and references 9 Further reading9.1 Papers10 External linksLife[edit] The son of a Russian-Jewish fur haulier, Nikolaus Pevsner
Nikolaus Pevsner
was born in Leipzig, Saxony
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Commander Of The Order Of The British Empire
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
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Goebbels
Paul Joseph Goebbels
Goebbels
(German: [ˈpaʊ̯l ˈjoːzəf ˈɡœbl̩s] ( listen);[1] 29 October 1897 – 1 May 1945) was a German Nazi politician and Reich Minister of Propaganda
Propaganda
of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
from 1933 to 1945. He was one of Adolf Hitler's close associates and most devoted followers, and was known for his skills in public speaking and his deep, virulent antisemitism, which was evident in his publicly voiced views. He advocated progressively harsher discrimination, including the extermination of the Jews in the Holocaust. Goebbels, who aspired to be an author, obtained a Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Heidelberg
University of Heidelberg
in 1921. He joined the Nazi Party in 1924, and worked with Gregor Strasser
Gregor Strasser
in their northern branch
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Law For The Restoration Of The Professional Civil Service
The Law
Law
for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service (German: Gesetz zur Wiederherstellung des Berufsbeamtentums, shortened to Berufsbeamtengesetz), also known as Civil Service Law, Civil Service Restoration Act, and Law
Law
to Re-establish the Civil Service, was a law passed by the National Socialist regime on 7 April 1933, two months after Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler
attained power. Article 1 of the Law
Law
claimed that in order to re-establish a "national" and "professional" civil service, members of certain groups of tenured civil servants were to be dismissed.[1] Civil servants who were not of Aryan
Aryan
descent were to retire
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Sydney Gordon Russell
Sir (Sydney) Gordon Russell, CBE, MC, RDI, FSIA (20 May 1892 – 7 October 1980) was an English designer, craftsman and educationist.Contents1 Biography 2 Career 3 Portrait bust of Sir Gordon Russell 4 References and sources 5 External linksBiography[edit] Gordon Russell was born in Cricklewood, London to Sydney Bolton and Elizabeth Russell. His father was a clerk in a bank but was later offered a job in George Allsop in Burton-on-Trent, the brewers. The family moved to live in Repton. When Gordon was twelve years old his father bought the Lygon Arms Inn in Broadway Worcestershire and the family moved again to live in the hotel. Gordon went to the Grammar School at the nearby village at Chipping Campden. In 1921 Gordon married Toni Denning. In 1925 he bought a one-and-a-half acre plot on Dover's Hill overlooking Chipping Campden
Chipping Campden
where they built their home, named Kingcombe
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Fellow Of The British Academy
Fellowship of the British Academy
British Academy
(FBA) is an award granted by the British Academy
British Academy
to leading academics for their distinction[1] in the humanities and social sciences.[2] There are three kinds of fellowship[3]Fellows, for scholars resident in the United Kingdom Corresponding Fellows, for scholars not resident in the UK Honorary Fellows, an honorary academic titleThe award of fellowship is evidenced by published work and fellows may use the post-nominal letters: FBA. Examples of fellows include Mary Beard, Nicholas Stern, Baron Stern of Brentford
Nicholas Stern, Baron Stern of Brentford
and Rowan Williams. See also[edit]List of Fellows of the British AcademyReferences[edit]^ "The British Academy
British Academy
welcomes new Fellows for 2015 University of Cambridge". Cam.ac.uk. 2015-07-16. Retrieved 2016-12-10.  ^ "Fellows British Academy"
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Bauhaus
Staatliches Bauhaus
Bauhaus
(German: [ˈʃtaːtlɪçəs ˈbaʊˌhaʊs] ( listen)), commonly known simply as Bauhaus, was a German art school operational from 1919 to 1933 that combined crafts and the fine arts, and was famous for the approach to design that it publicised and taught.[1] The Bauhaus
Bauhaus
was founded by Walter Gropius
Walter Gropius
in Weimar. The German term Bauhaus—literally "construction house"—was understood as meaning "School of Building", but in spite of its name and the fact that its founder was an architect, the Bauhaus
Bauhaus
did not have an architecture department during its first years of existence. Nonetheless, it was founded with the idea of creating a "total" work of art (Gesamtkunstwerk) in which all arts, including architecture, would eventually be brought together
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Weimar
Weimar
Weimar
(German pronunciation: [ˈvaɪmaɐ̯]; Latin: Vimaria or Vinaria) is a city in the federal state of Thuringia, Germany. It is located between Erfurt
Erfurt
in the west and Jena
Jena
in the east, approximately 80 kilometres (50 miles) southwest of Leipzig, 170 kilometres (106 miles) north of Nuremberg
Nuremberg
and 170 kilometres (106 miles) west of Dresden
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Faber & Faber
Faber and Faber Limited, often abbreviated to Faber, is an independent publishing house in the United Kingdom. Faber has published some of the most well-known literature in the English language, including William Golding's Lord of the Flies. Poet T. S. Eliot
T. S. Eliot
was once a Faber editor. In 2006 the company was named the KPMG
KPMG
Publisher of the Year.[1] Faber and Faber Inc., formerly the American branch of the London company, was sold in 1998 to the Holtzbrinck company Farrar, Straus and Giroux
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Nazis
National Socialism
Socialism
(German: Nationalsozialismus), more commonly known as Nazism
Nazism
(/ˈnɑːtsi.ɪzəm, ˈnæt-/),[1] is the ideology and practices associated with the 20th-century German Nazi Party
Nazi Party
in Nazi Germany and of other far-right groups with similar aims
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University Of Göttingen
The University of Göttingen
Göttingen
(German: Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, GAU, known informally as Georgia Augusta) is a public research university in the city of Göttingen, Germany. Founded in 1734 by George II, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover, and starting classes in 1737, the university is the oldest in the state of Lower Saxony
Lower Saxony
and the largest in student enrollment, which stands at around 31,500.[5] Home to many noted figures, it represents one of Germany's historic and traditional institutions
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Hitlerism
National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), more commonly known as Nazism (/ˈnɑːtsi.ɪzəm, ˈnæt-/),[1] is the ideology and practices associated with the 20th-century German Nazi Party in Nazi Germany and of other far-right groups with similar aims. Usually characterized as a form of fascism that incorporates scientific racism and antisemitism, Nazism was influenced by German nationalism (especially Pan-Germanism), the Völkisch movement, and the anti-Communist Freikorps paramilitary groups that emerged during the Weimar Republic after Germany's defeat in the First World War. Nazism subscribed to theories of racial hierarchy and Social Darwinism, identifying the Germans as a part of what the Nazis regarded as an Aryan or Nordic master race.[2] It aimed to overcome social divisions and create a German homogeneous society based on racial purity which represented a people's community (Volksgemeinschaft)
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Huyton
Huyton
Huyton
(/ˈhaɪtən/ HY-tən) is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, in Merseyside, England. It is part of the Liverpool
Liverpool
Urban Area, sharing borders with the Liverpool
Liverpool
suburbs of Dovecot, Knotty Ash, and Belle Vale. Huyton
Huyton
has close associations with the neighbouring village of Roby: both were part of the Huyton with Roby Urban District between 1894 and 1974.[1] Historically in Lancashire, Huyton
Huyton
was an ancient parish which in the mid-19th century contained Croxteth Park, Knowsley and Tarbock, in addition to the township of Huyton-with-Roby
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The Blitz
The Blitz
The Blitz
was a German bombing offensive against Britain in 1940 and 1941, during the Second World War
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Die Zeitung
Die Zeitung (English: The Newspaper) was a German-language newspaper in London published during World War II. It had an average circulation of 15,000 to 20,000 from March 1941 to June 1945[1] and was mainly read by Germans in exile. A lighter version was sold overseas and airdropped over Germany by the Royal Air Force. The paper mainly covered news about the ongoing war and the situation in Nazi Germany. In its first issue the paper claimed it was the only free and independent German-language newspaper left in Europe. See also[edit]ExilliteraturReferences[edit]^ Sylvia Asmus (2006-06-28). "Erläuterungen: Die Zeitung" (in German). Deutsche Nationalbibliothek
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Allen Lane
Sir Allen Lane
Allen Lane
(born Allen Lane
Allen Lane
Williams; 21 September 1902 – 7 July 1970) was a British publisher who together with his brothers Richard and John Lane founded Penguin Books
Penguin Books
in 1935, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market.[1][2] In 1967 he started a hardback imprint under his own name, Allen Lane.Contents1 Early life and family 2 Career as a publisher 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksEarly life and family[edit] Allen Lane
Allen Lane
Williams was born in Bristol
Bristol
to Camilla (née Lane) and Samuel Williams, and studied at Bristol
Bristol
Grammar School. In 1919 he joined the publishing company Bodley Head as an apprentice to his uncle and founder of the company John Lane
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