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Nikolaus Esterhazy
Nikolaus I, Prince Esterházy
Nikolaus I, Prince Esterházy
(Hungarian: Esterházy I. Miklós, German: Nikolaus I. Joseph Fürst Esterhazy; 18 December 1714 – 28 September 1790) was a Hungarian prince, a member of the famous Esterházy family. His building of palaces, extravagant clothing, and taste for opera and other grand musical productions led to his being given the title "the Magnificent".[1] He is remembered as the principal employer of the composer Joseph Haydn.Contents1 Life 2 Personal characteristics 3 Benevolence 4 Nikolaus and Joseph Haydn 5 Notes 6 ReferencesLife[edit] Nikolaus Esterházy was the son of Prince Joseph (József Simon Antal, 1688–1721), and the younger brother of Prince Paul Anton (Pál Antal, 1711–1762)
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Hungarian Language
Hungarian ( magyar nyelv (help·info)) is a Finno-Ugric language spoken in Hungary
Hungary
and several neighbouring countries. It is the official language of Hungary
Hungary
and one of the 24 official languages of the European Union. Outside Hungary
Hungary
it is also spoken by communities of Hungarians
Hungarians
in the countries that today make up Slovakia, western Ukraine, central and western Romania
Romania
(Transylvania and Partium), northern Serbia
Serbia
(Vojvodina), southern Poland[citation needed], northern Croatia, and northern Slovenia
Slovenia
due to the effects of the Treaty of Trianon, which resulted in many ethnic Hungarians
Hungarians
being displaced from their homes and communities in the former territories of the Austro-Hungarian Empire
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List Of Operas By Joseph Haydn
Joseph Haydn
Joseph Haydn
is not primarily remembered as a composer of opera, yet the genre occupied a great deal of his time. During the 1770s and 1780s, Haydn ran an opera troupe on behalf of his employer, Prince Nikolaus Esterházy, which put on up to 150 performances per year. A number of the operas were Haydn's own work. Haydn's operas are only occasionally performed today. The list is arranged chronologically and divided by career stage.Contents1 Composed as a freelance musician 2 Composed during Haydn's service for the Eszterházy family 3 Composed for the first London journey 4 ReferencesComposed as a freelance musician[edit]1751: Der krumme Teufel, Hob. 29/1a, Singspiel
Singspiel
(libretto by Joseph von Kurz), composed during Haydn's time as a freelance musician
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Karl Geiringer
Karl Geiringer (April 26, 1899 – January 10, 1989)[1] was an Austrian American musicologist, educator, and biographer of composers. He was educated in Vienna
Vienna
but at the beginning of the Nazi years he emigrated to England and ultimately the United States, where he had a lengthy and distinguished career at several universities. He was a noted authority on Brahms, Haydn, and the Bach
Bach
family, and a prolific author.Contents1 Life 2 Scholarship 3 Notable works 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Geiringer was born in Vienna, the son of Louis and Martha (nee Wertheimer) Geiringer.[2][3] He studied music history at the University of Vienna
Vienna
under Guido Adler
Guido Adler
and Curt Sachs, and studied composition under Hans Gál. He also studied at the University of Berlin under Curt Sachs.[3] He received his Ph.D
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Kapellmeister
Kapellmeister (German: [kaˈpɛl.ˌmaɪstɐ])[1] is a German word designating a person in charge of music-making. The word is a compound, consisting of the roots Kapelle ("choir", "orchestra", or originally, "chapel") and Meister ("master"). The word was originally used to refer to somebody in charge of music in a chapel. However, the term has evolved considerably in its meaning in response to changes in the musical profession.Contents1 Historical usage1.1 The case of Mozart2 Similar terms and equivalents 3 Composers who held the post of Kapellmeister 4 Contemporary usage 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesHistorical usage[edit] In German-speaking countries during the approximate period 1500–1800, the word Kapellmeister often designated the director of music for a monarch or nobleman
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Gregor Werner
Gregor Joseph Werner (28 January 1693 – 3 March 1766[1]) was an Austrian composer.Contents1 Career 2 Works 3 Relations with Haydn 4 Reception 5 Selected recordings 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksCareer[edit] Werner was born in Ybbs an der Donau.[2] He served from 1715 to either 1716 or 1721 (unknown) as the organist at Melk Abbey.[2] During the 1720s he was in Vienna, where he may have studied with Johann Fux. Werner was married on 27 January 1727.[2] On 10 May 1728 he took up the position he was to hold for the rest of his life, as Kapellmeister at the Esterházy court in Schloss Esterházy in Eisenstadt.[2] The appointment "opened a new era for music"[3] at the court; previously, there had been seven years of relative inactivity following the death of Prince Joseph in 1721; his widow Maria Octavia, serving as co-rege
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Luigia Polzelli
Luigia Polzelli (also Polcelli; c. 1760 – 5 October 1830) was an Italian mezzo-soprano, who sang at the Esterházy court in Hungary during the late 18th century. She was for a number of years the lover of the composer Joseph Haydn.Contents1 Early years 2 Relationship with Haydn 3 Musical influence on Haydn 4 Children 5 Breakup 6 Later life 7 Correspondence 8 Notes 9 ReferencesEarly years[edit] Luigia Polzelli was born Luigia Moreschi in Naples
Naples
sometime around 1760. She married the violinist Antonio Polzelli some time before 1779. The couple apparently lived in Bologna.[1] Relationship with Haydn[edit] Luigia arrived at the Esterházy court with her husband Antonio in 1779; both had two-year contracts. Luigia was nineteen years old at the time.[2] Polzelli soon turned out not to be a particularly able singer
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Johann Evangelist Haydn
Johann Evangelist Haydn (December 23, 1743 – May 10, 1805) was a tenor singer of the classical era; the younger brother of the composers Joseph Haydn
Joseph Haydn
and Michael Haydn. He was often called "Hansl", a diminutive form of "Johann". Johann was the eleventh child of Mathias Haydn and Anna Maria Koller Haydn (Joseph was second, and Michael sixth). His career training may have been mixed. According to Albert Christoph Dies, an early biographer of Joseph Haydn, Johann followed his older brothers in serving as a choirboy in St
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Baryton Trios (Haydn)
Joseph Haydn
Joseph Haydn
wrote 123 trios for the combination of baryton, viola, and cello. In addition, there are three trios (H. XI:89-91) for baryton, cello, and violin; considered part of the same series.[1] As Sisman notes, they are "the most intensively cultivated genre of Haydn's earlier career."[2]Contents1 The baryton 2 History 3 The music3.1 Form 3.2 The role of the three instruments 3.3 Stylistic evolution 3.4 Musical quotations4 Prince Esterházy's baryton 5 Critical opinion 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksThe baryton[edit] The baryton is a bowed string instrument of the viol family played in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries. It has six or seven strings of gut, arranged over a fretted fingerboard, plus a lower set of wire strings. When the gut strings are bowed, the wire strings vibrate sympathetically, enriching the tone. The wire strings may also be plucked by the performer's left thumb, creating a contrasting tonal quality
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Opera
Opera
Opera
(Italian: [ˈɔːpera]; English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere [ˈɔːpere]) is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text (libretto) and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting.[1] In traditional opera, singers do two types of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style[2] and arias, a more melodic style, in which notes are sung in a sustained fashion. Opera
Opera
incorporates many of the elements of spoken theatre, such as acting, scenery, and costumes and sometimes includes dance
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Symphony
A symphony is an extended musical composition in Western classical music, most often written by composers for orchestra. Although the term has had many meanings from its origins in the ancient Greek era, by the late 18th century the word had taken on the meaning common today: a work usually consisting of multiple distinct sections or movements, often four, with the first movement in sonata form. Symphonies are scored for string (violin, viola, cello, and double bass), brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments which altogether number about 30–100 musicians. Symphonies are notated in a musical score, which contains all the instrument parts. Orchestral musicians play from parts which contain just the notated music for their instrument
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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Count Morzin
Count Morzin
Count Morzin
was an aristocrat of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
during the 18th century
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Paris Symphonies
The Paris symphonies are a group of six symphonies written by Joseph Haydn commissioned by the Chevalier de Saint-Georges, music director of the orchestra the Concert de la Loge Olympique, in behalf of its sponsor, Count D'Ogny, Grandmaster of the Masonic
Masonic
Loge Olympique. Beginning on January 11, 1786 the symphonies were performed by the Olympique in the Salle des Gardes du Corps of the Tuileries, conducted by Saint-Georges.[1]Contents1 The Symphonies 2 History 3 Reception 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesThe Symphonies[edit] The symphonies are:Symphony No. 82 in C major, The Bear (1786) Symphony No. 83 in G minor, La Poule ("The Hen") (1785) Symphony No. 84 in E♭ major, In Nomine Domini (1786) Symphony No. 85 in B♭ major, La Reine ("The Queen") (1785) Symphony No. 86 in D major (1786) Symphony No
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University Of California Press
University of California
University of California
Press, otherwise known as UC Press, is a publishing house associated with the University of California
University of California
that engages in academic publishing. It was founded in 1893[2] to publish books and papers for the faculty of the University of California, established 25 years earlier in 1868. Its headquarters are located in Oakland, California. The University of California
University of California
Press currently publishes in the following general subject areas: anthropology, art, ancient world/classical studies, California
California
and the West, cinema & media studies, criminology, environmental studies, food and wine, history, music, politics, psychology, public health and medicine, religion, and sociology. It is a non-profit publishing arm of the University of California
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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