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Nihonbashi
Nihonbashi
Nihonbashi
(日本橋, " Japan
Japan
Bridge") is a business district of Chūō, Tokyo, Japan
Japan
which grew up around the bridge of the same name which has linked two sides of the Nihonbashi River
Nihonbashi River
at this site since the 17th century. The first wooden bridge was completed in 1603. The current bridge, designed by Tsumaki Yorinaka
Tsumaki Yorinaka
and constructed of stone on a steel frame, dates from 1911.[1] The district covers a large area to the north and east of the bridge, reaching Akihabara
Akihabara
to the north and the Sumida River
Sumida River
to the east
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Kanji
Kanji
Kanji
(漢字; [kandʑi]  listen) are the adopted logographic Chinese characters
Chinese characters
that are used in the Japanese writing system.[1] They are used alongside hiragana and katakana
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Meiji Era
The Meiji period
Meiji period
(明治時代, Meiji-jidai), also known as the Meiji era, is a Japanese era which extended from October 23, 1868, to July 30, 1912.[1] This period represents the first half of the Empire of Japan
Japan
during which Japanese society moved from being an isolated feudal society to its modern form. Fundamental changes affected its social structure, internal politics, economy, military, and foreign relations. The period corresponded to the reign of Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
after 1868, and lasted until his death in 1912
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Highway
A highway is any public or private road or other public way on land. It is used for major roads, but also includes other public roads and public tracks: It is not an equivalent term to controlled-access highway, or a translation for autobahn, autoroute, etc. In North American and Australian English, major roads such as controlled-access highways or arterial roads are often state highways (Canada: provincial highways). Other roads may be designated "county highways" in the US and Ontario. These classifications refer to the level of government (state, provincial, county) that maintains the roadway. In British English, "highway" is primarily a legal term
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Nakasendō
The Nakasendō
Nakasendō
(中山道, Central Mountain Route), also called the Kisokaidō (木曾街道),[1] was one of the five routes of the Edo period, and one of the two that connected Edo
Edo
(modern-day Tokyo) to Kyoto
Kyoto
in Japan. There were 69 stations (staging-posts) between Edo
Edo
and Kyoto, crossing through Musashi, Kōzuke, Shinano, Mino and Ōmi provinces.[2] In addition to Tokyo
Tokyo
and Kyoto, the Nakasendō
Nakasendō
runs through the modern-day prefectures of Saitama, Gunma, Nagano, Gifu and Shiga, with a total distance of about 534 km (332 mi).[3] Unlike the coastal Tōkaidō, the Nakasendō
Nakasendō
traveled inland,[4] hence its name, which can be translated as "中 = central; 山 = mountain; 道 = route" (as opposed to the Tōkaidō, which roughly meant "eastern sea route")
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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1964 Summer Olympics
The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad (Japanese: 第十八回オリンピック競技大会, Hepburn: Dai Jūhachi-kai Orinpikku Kyōgi Taikai), was an international multi-sport event held in Tokyo, Japan, from 10 to 24 October 1964
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Department Store
A department store is a retail establishment offering a wide range of consumer goods in different product categories known as "departments". In modern major cities, the department store made a dramatic appearance in the middle of the 19th century, and permanently reshaped shopping habits, and the definition of service and luxury. Similar developments were under way in London (with Whiteleys), in Paris (Le Bon Marché in 1852) and in New York (with Stewart's).[1] Today, departments often include the following: clothing, furniture, home appliances, toys, cosmetics, houseware, gardening, toiletries, sporting goods, do it yourself, paint, and hardware. Additionally, other lines of products such as food, books, jewelry, electronics, stationery, photographic equipment, baby products, and products for pets are sometimes included. Customers generally check out near the front of the store, although some stores include sales counters within each department
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Mitsui Family
Mitsui clan (三井家, Mitsui-ke) is one of the most powerful families of merchants and industrialists in Japan. The Mitsui enterprise made its debut in 1673 when Mitsui Takatoshi (1622–1694), son of a sake brewer, established Echigo-ya, a dry goods department store in both Edo
Edo
and Kyoto. Meeting with great success, Takatoshi extended his services to moneylending and exchange. In 1691 the Mitsuis were officially chartered as merchants of the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
which ruled during that time
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Mercantile
Trade
Trade
involves the transfer of goods or services from one person or entity to another, often in exchange for money. A system or network that allows trade is called a market. The original form of trade, barter, saw the direct exchange of goods and services for other goods and services.[1][need quotation to verify] Barter
Barter
involves trading things without the use of money.[1] Later one bartering party started to involve precious metals, which gained symbolic as well as practical importance. Modern traders generally negotiate through a medium of exchange, such as money. As a result, buying can be separated from selling, or earning. The invention of money (and later credit, paper money and of non-physical money) greatly simplified and promoted trade
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Controlled-access Highway
A controlled-access highway is a type of highway which has been designed for high-speed vehicular traffic, with all traffic flow and ingress/egress regulated. Common English terms are freeway (in Australia, South Africa
South Africa
and parts of the United States
United States
and Canada), motorway (in the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand
New Zealand
and parts of Australia), expressway (in some parts of Canada, parts of the United States, and many Asian countries), and autoroute (in Québec, Canada). Other similar terms include Interstate and parkway
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Keisai Eisen
Keisai Eisen
Keisai Eisen
(渓斎 英泉, 1790–1848) was a Japanese ukiyo-e artist who specialised in bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women). His best works, including his ōkubi-e ("large head pictures"), are considered to be masterpieces of the "decadent" Bunsei
Bunsei
Era (1818–1830). He was also known as Ikeda Eisen, and wrote under the name of Ippitsuan. Biography[edit] Eisen was born in Edo
Edo
into the Ikeda family, the son of a noted calligrapher. He was apprenticed to Kanō Hakkeisai, from whom he took the name Keisai, and after the death of his father he studied under Kikugawa Eizan. His initial works reflected the influence of his mentor, but he soon developed his own style. He produced a number of surimono (prints that were privately issued), erotic prints, and landscapes, including The Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Kaidō, which he started and which was completed by Hiroshige
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Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji
(富士山, Fujisan, IPA: [ɸɯꜜdʑisaɴ] ( listen)), located on Honshu Island, is the highest mountain in Japan
Japan
at 3,776.24 m (12,389 ft) and 7th-highest mountain on an island.[1] It is an active stratovolcano that last erupted in 1707–1708.[4][5] Mount Fuji lies about 100 kilometres (60 mi) south-west of Tokyo, and can be seen from there on a clear day. Mount Fuji's exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is snow-capped for about 5 months a year, is a well-known symbol of Japan
Japan
and it is frequently depicted in art and photographs, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers.[6] Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji
is one of Japan's "Three Holy Mountains" (三霊山, Sanreizan) along with Mount Tate
Mount Tate
and Mount Haku
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Hiroshige
Utagawa Hiroshige
Utagawa Hiroshige
(Japanese: 歌川 広重), also Andō Hiroshige (Japanese: 安藤 広重; 1797 – 12 October 1858), was a Japanese ukiyo-e artist, considered the last great master of that tradition. Hiroshige
Hiroshige
is best known for his landscapes, such as the series The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō and The Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Kaidō; and for his depictions of birds and flowers. The subjects of his work were atypical of the ukiyo-e genre, whose typical focus was on beautiful women, popular actors, and other scenes of the urban pleasure districts of Japan's Edo
Edo
period (1603–1868)
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Ukiyo-e
Ukiyo-e[a] is a genre of Japanese art
Japanese art
which flourished from the 17th through 19th centuries. Its artists produced woodblock prints and paintings of such subjects as female beauties; kabuki actors and sumo wrestlers; scenes from history and folk tales; travel scenes and landscapes; flora and fauna; and erotica. The term ukiyo-e (浮世絵) translates as "picture[s] of the floating world". Edo
Edo
(modern Tokyo) became the seat of government for the military dictatorship in the early 17th century. The merchant class at the bottom of the social order benefited most from the city's rapid economic growth. Many indulged in the entertainments of kabuki theatre, courtesans, and geisha of the pleasure districts
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