HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Nicodemus
Nicodemus
Nicodemus
(/ˌnɪkəˈdiːməs/; Greek: Νικόδημος) was a Pharisee
Pharisee
and a member of the
[...More...]

"Nicodemus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Apocrypha
Apocrypha
Apocrypha
are works, usually written, of unknown authorship or of doubtful origin.[1] Biblical apocrypha
Biblical apocrypha
is a set of texts included in the Latin Vulgate
Latin Vulgate
and Septuagint
Septuagint
but not in the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible. While Catholic tradition considers the texts to be deuterocanonical, Protestants consider them apocryphal. Thus, Protestant
Protestant
bibles do not include the books within the Old Testament
Old Testament
but have often included them in a separate section
[...More...]

"Apocrypha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rabbi
In Judaism, a rabbi /ˈræbaɪ/ is a teacher of Torah. The basic form of the rabbi developed in the Pharisaic and Talmudic era, when learned teachers assembled to codify Judaism's written and oral laws. The first sage for whom the Mishnah
Mishnah
uses the title of rabbi was Yohanan ben Zakkai, active in the early-to-mid first century CE.[1] In more recent centuries, the duties of a rabbi became increasingly influenced by the duties of the Protestant Christian minister, hence the title "pulpit rabbis", and in 19th-century Germany and the United States rabbinic activities including sermons, pastoral counseling, and representing the community to the outside, all increased in importance. Within the various Jewish denominations there are different requirements for rabbinic ordination, and differences in opinion regarding who is to be recognized as a rabbi
[...More...]

"Rabbi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Synoptic Gospels
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke are referred to as the Synoptic Gospels because they include many of the same stories, often in a similar sequence and in similar or sometimes identical wording. They stand in contrast to John, whose content is comparatively distinct. The term synoptic (Latin: synopticus; Greek: συνοπτικός, translit. synoptikós) comes via Latin from the Greek σύνοψις, synopsis, i.e
[...More...]

"Synoptic Gospels" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Talmud
—— Tannaitic ——Mishnah Tosefta—— Amoraic (Gemara) —— Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Talmud Babylonian Talmud—— Later ——Minor TractatesHalakhic Midrash—— Exodus ——Mekhilta of Rabbi
Rabbi
Ishmael
[...More...]

"Talmud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jewish Encyclopedia
The Jewish Encyclopedia[n 1] is an English encyclopedia containing over 15,000 articles on the history, culture, and state of Judaism
Judaism
and the Jews
Jews
up to the early 20th century.[1] It was originally published in 12 volumes by Funk and Wagnalls
Funk and Wagnalls
of New York City
New York City
between 1901 and 1906 and reprinted in the 1960s by KTAV Publishing House. The work's scholarship is still highly regarded: the American Jewish Archives
American Jewish Archives
has called it "the most monumental Jewish scientific work of modern times"[2] and Rabbi
Rabbi
Joshua L
[...More...]

"Jewish Encyclopedia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(/dʒəˈruːsələm/; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם‬  Yerushaláyim; Arabic: القُدس‎  al-Quds)[note 2] is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. It is one of the oldest cities in the world, and is considered holy to the three major Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity
Christianity
and Islam
[...More...]

"Jerusalem" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

4th Century
The 4th century
4th century
(per the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
and Anno Domini/Common era) was the time period which lasted from 301
301
to 400. In the West, the early part of the century was shaped by Constantine the Great, who became the first Roman emperor to convert to Christianity. Gaining sole reign of the empire, he is also noted for re-establishing a single imperial capital, choosing the site of ancient Byzantium
Byzantium
in 330 (over the current capitals, which had effectively been changed by Diocletian's reforms to Milan
Milan
in the West, and Nicomedeia in the East) to build the city soon called Nova Roma (New Rome); it was later renamed Constantinople
Constantinople
in his honor. The last emperor to control both the eastern and western halves of the empire was Theodosius I
[...More...]

"4th Century" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Passover
Passover
Passover
or Pesach (/ˈpɛsɑːx, ˈpeɪsɑːx/;[4] from Hebrew פֶּסַח‬ Pesah, Pesakh) is a major, biblically derived Jewish holiday. Jews
Jews
celebrate Passover
Passover
as a commemoration of their liberation by God from slavery in ancient Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses
[...More...]

"Passover" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aloe
See SpeciesSynonyms[2]Lomatophyllum Willd. Rhipidodendrum Willd. Phylloma Ker Gawl. Pachidendron Haw. Agriodendron Endl. Atevala Raf. Busipho Salisb. Chamaealoe A.Berger × Lomataloe Guillaumin Leptaloe Stapf Aloinella (A.Berger) Lemée Guillauminia A.Bertrand × Alchamaloe G.D.Rowley × Aleptoe G.D.Rowley × Allauminia G.D.Rowley × Alamaealoe P.V.Heath × Aloella G.D.Rowley × Leptauminia G.D.Rowley × Chamaeleptaloe Rowley × Leptaloinella G.D.Rowley × Allemeea P.V.Heath × Aloptaloe P.V.Heath Lemeea P.V.Heath × Bleckara P.V.Heath × Leminia P.V.HeathSucculent plants, such as this aloe, store water in their enlarged fleshy leaves, stems, or roots, as shown in this split aloe leaf. This allows them to survive in arid environments. Aloe
Aloe
vossiiA
[...More...]

"Aloe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kingdom Of God
The concept of the kingship of God
God
appears in all Abrahamic religions, where in some cases the terms Kingdom of God
God
and Kingdom of Heaven
Heaven
are also used. The notion of God's kingship goes back to the Hebrew Bible, which refers to "his kingdom" but does not include the term "Kingdom of God".[1][2] The "Kingdom of God" and its equivalent form "Kingdom of Heaven" in the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
is one of the key elements of the teachings of Jesus
Jesus
in the New Testament. The Gospel of Mark indicates that the gospel is the good news about the Kingdom of God. The term pertains to the kingdom that Jesus
Jesus
will establish on the earth when he returns. Kingdom of "heaven" appears in Matthew's gospel due primarily to Jewish sensibilities about uttering the "name" (God)
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of God" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Womb
The uterus (from Latin
Latin
"uterus", plural uteri) or womb is a major female hormone-responsive secondary sex organ of the reproductive system in humans and most other mammals. In the human, the lower end of the uterus, the cervix, opens into the vagina, while the upper end, the fundus, is connected to the fallopian tubes. It is within the uterus that the fetus develops during gestation. In the human embryo, the uterus develops from the paramesonephric ducts which fuse into the single organ known as a simplex uterus
[...More...]

"Womb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crucifixion
Crucifixion
Crucifixion
is a method of capital punishment in which the victim is tied or nailed to a large wooden beam and left to hang for several days until eventual death from exhaustion and asphyxiation.[1][2][3] The crucifixion of Jesus is a central narrative in Christianity, and the cross (sometimes depicting Jesus nailed onto it) is the main religious symbol for many Christian
[...More...]

"Crucifixion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Jewish Law
Halakha (/hɑːˈlɔːxə/;[1] Hebrew: הֲלָכָה‬, Sephardic: [halaˈχa]; also transliterated as halacha, halakhah, halachah or halocho) (Ashkenazic: [haˈloχo]) is the collective body of Jewish religious laws derived from the Written and Oral Torah. It is based on biblical laws or "commandments" (mitzvot) (traditionally numbered as 613), subsequent Talmudic and rabbinic law and the customs and traditions compiled in the many books, one of the most famous of which is the 16th-century Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(literally "Prepared Table"). Halakha is often translated as " Jewish
Jewish
Law", although a more literal translation might be "the way to behave" or "the way of walking". The word derives from the root that means "to behave" (also "to go" or "to walk")
[...More...]

"Jewish Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles Ellicott
Charles John Ellicott (1819–1905) was a distinguished English Christian theologian, academic and churchman
[...More...]

"Charles Ellicott" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sanhedrin
The Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
(Greek: Συνέδριον,[1] synedrion, "sitting together," hence "assembly" or "council") was an assembly of twenty-three or seventy-one rabbis appointed to sit as a tribunal in every city in the ancient Land of Israel. There were two classes of rabbinical courts called Sanhedrin, the Great Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
and the Lesser Sanhedrin. A lesser Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
of 23 judges was appointed to each city, but there was to be only one Great Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
of 71 judges, which among other roles acted as the Supreme Court, taking appeals from cases decided by lesser courts
[...More...]

"Sanhedrin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.