HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Next Unit Of Computing
Next Unit of Computing
Next Unit of Computing
(NUC) is a small-form-factor personal computer designed by Intel. The NUC has had eight generations so far, spanning from Sandy Bridge-based Celeron
Celeron
CPUs in the first generation through Ivy Bridge-based Core i3 and i5 CPUs in the second generation to Gemini Lake-based Pentium
Pentium
and Celeron
Celeron
CPUs and Kaby Lake-based Core i3, i5, and i7 CPUs in the seventh and eighth generations
[...More...]

"Next Unit Of Computing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Kaby Lake-G
Kaby Lake is an Intel codename for a processor microarchitecture Intel announced on August 30, 2016.[6] Like the preceding Skylake, Kaby Lake is produced using a 14 nanometer manufacturing process technology.[7] Breaking with Intel's previous "tick-tock" manufacturing and design model, Kaby Lake represents the optimized step of the newer "process-architecture-optimization" model.[8] Kaby Lake began shipping to manufacturers and OEMs in the second quarter of 2016,[9][10] and mobile chips have started shipping while Kaby Lake (desktop) chips were officially launched in January 2017. In August 2017, Intel announced Kaby Lake Refresh (Kaby Lake R) marketed as the 8th generation mobile CPUs, breaking the long cycle where architectures matched the corresponding generations of CPUs.[11][12] Skylake was anticipated to be succeeded by the 10 nanometer Cannon Lake, but it was announced in July 2015 that Cannon Lake has been delayed until the second half of 2017.[13][14] In the meantime, Intel re
[...More...]

"Kaby Lake-G" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

PCIe 2.0
PCI Express
PCI Express
(Peripheral Component Interconnect Express), officially abbreviated as PCIe or PCI-e,[1] is a high-speed serial computer expansion bus standard, designed to replace the older PCI, PCI-X, and AGP bus standards. PCIe has numerous improvements over the older standards, including higher maximum system bus throughput, lower I/O pin count and smaller physical footprint, better performance scaling for bus devices, a more detailed error detection and reporting mechanism (Advanced Error Reporting, AER[2]), and native hot-swap functionality
[...More...]

"PCIe 2.0" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

SO-DIMM
A SO-DIMM, SODIMM, or small outline dual in-line memory module, is a type of computer memory built using integrated circuits
[...More...]

"SO-DIMM" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

USB 2.0
USB, short for Universal Serial Bus, is an industry standard that was developed to define cables, connectors and protocols for connection, communication, and power supply between personal computers and their peripheral devices. [3] USB
USB
was designed to standardize the connection of computer peripherals (including keyboards, pointing devices, digital cameras, printers, portable media players, disk drives and network adapters) to personal computers, both to communicate and to supply electric power. It has largely replaced interfaces such as serial ports and parallel ports, and has become commonplace on a wide range of devices
[...More...]

"USB 2.0" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

IEEE 802.11ac
IEEE 802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11
802.11
family (which is marketed under the brand name Wi-Fi), developed in the IEEE Standards Association, providing high-throughput wireless local area networks (WLANs) on the 5 GHz band. The standard was developed from 2008 (PAR approved 2008-09-26) through 2013 and published in December 2013 (ANSI approved 2013-12-11).[1][2] The specification has multi-station throughput of at least 1 gigabit per second and single-link throughput of at least 500 megabits per second (500 Mbit/s)
[...More...]

"IEEE 802.11ac" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

WiDi
Wireless Display (WiDi) was technology developed by Intel
Intel
that enabled users to stream music, movies, photos, videos and apps without wires from a compatible computer to a compatible HDTV or through the use of an adapter with other HDTVs or monitors
[...More...]

"WiDi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

M.2
M.2, formerly known as the Next Generation Form Factor (NGFF), is a specification from 2013 for internally mounted computer expansion cards and associated connectors. It replaces the mSATA standard, which uses the PCI Express Mini Card
PCI Express Mini Card
physical card layout and connectors. M.2's more flexible physical specification allows different module widths and lengths, and, paired with the availability of more advanced interfacing features, makes the M.2
M.2
more suitable than mSATA for solid-state storage applications in general and particularly for the use in small devices such as ultrabooks or tablets.[1][2][3] Computer bus
Computer bus
interfaces provided through the M.2
M.2
connector are PCI Express 3.0 (up to four lanes), Serial ATA 3.0, and USB 3.0 (a single logical port for each of the latter two)
[...More...]

"M.2" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Braswell (SOC)
Silvermont is a microarchitecture for low-power Atom, Celeron and Pentium branded processors used in systems on a chip (SoCs) made by Intel
[...More...]

"Braswell (SOC)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

DDR3L
Double data rate
Double data rate
type three SDRAM (DDR3 SDRAM) is a type of synchronous dynamic random-access memory (SDRAM) with a high bandwidth ("double data rate") interface, and has been in use since 2007. It is the higher-speed successor to DDR and DDR2 and predecessor to DDR4 synchronous dynamic random-access memory (SDRAM) chips. DDR3 SDRAM
DDR3 SDRAM
is neither forward nor backward compatible with any earlier type of random-access memory (RAM) because of different signaling voltages, timings, and other factors. DDR3 is a DRAM interface specification. The actual DRAM arrays that store the data are similar to earlier types, with similar performance. The primary benefit of DDR3 SDRAM
DDR3 SDRAM
over its immediate predecessor, DDR2 SDRAM, is its ability to transfer data at twice the rate (eight times the speed of its internal memory arrays), enabling higher bandwidth or peak data rates
[...More...]

"DDR3L" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

802.11ac
IEEE 802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11
802.11
family (which is marketed under the brand name Wi-Fi), developed in the IEEE Standards Association, providing high-throughput wireless local area networks (WLANs) on the 5 GHz band. The standard was developed from 2008 (PAR approved 2008-09-26) through 2013 and published in December 2013 (ANSI approved 2013-12-11).[1][2] The specification has multi-station throughput of at least 1 gigabit per second and single-link throughput of at least 500 megabits per second (500 Mbit/s)
[...More...]

"802.11ac" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bluetooth 4.0
Bluetooth
Bluetooth
is a wireless technology standard for exchanging data over short distances (using short-wavelength UHF
UHF
radio waves in the ISM band from 2.4 to 2.485 GHz[3]) from fixed and mobile devices, and building personal area networks (PANs). Invented by telecom vendor Ericsson
Ericsson
in 1994,[4] it was originally conceived as a wireless alternative to RS-232
RS-232
data cables. Bluetooth
Bluetooth
is managed by the Bluetooth Special Interest Group
Bluetooth Special Interest Group
(SIG), which has more than 30,000 member companies in the areas of telecommunication, computing, networking, and consumer electronics.[5] The IEEE standardized Bluetooth
Bluetooth
as IEEE 802.15.1, but no longer maintains the standard
[...More...]

"Bluetooth 4.0" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

TOSLINK
TOSLINK
TOSLINK
(from Toshiba
Toshiba
Link[2]) is a standardized optical fiber connector system.[3] Also known generically as an "optical audio cable" or just "optical cable", its most common use is in consumer audio equipment (via a "digital optical" socket), where it carries a digital audio stream from components such as CD and DVD
DVD
players, DAT recorders, computers, and modern video game consoles, to an AV receiver that can decode two channels of uncompressed lossless PCM audio or compressed 5.1/7.1 surround sound such as Dolby Digital
Dolby Digital
Plus or DTS-HD High Resolution Audio
[...More...]

"TOSLINK" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

HDMI
HDMI
HDMI
(High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a proprietary audio/video interface for transmitting uncompressed video data and compressed or uncompressed digital audio data from an HDMI-compliant source device, such as a display controller, to a compatible computer monitor, video projector, digital television, or digital audio device.[4] HDMI
HDMI
is a digital replacement for analog video standards. HDMI
HDMI
implements the EIA/ CEA-861 standards, which define video formats and waveforms, transport of compressed, uncompressed, and LPCM audio, auxiliary data, and implementations of the VESA EDID.[5][6](p. III) CEA-861 signals carried by HDMI
HDMI
are electrically compatible with the CEA-861 signals used by the digital visual interface (DVI)
[...More...]

"HDMI" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

SDXC
Secure Digital
Secure Digital
(SD) is a non-volatile memory card format developed by the SD Card Association
SD Card Association
(SDA) for use in portable devices. The standard was introduced in August 1999 by joint efforts between SanDisk, Panasonic
Panasonic
(Matsushita Electric) and Toshiba
Toshiba
as an improvement over MultiMediaCards (MMC),[1] and has become the industry standard. The three companies formed SD-3C, LLC, a company that licenses and enforces intellectual property rights associated with SD memory cards and SD host and ancillary products.[2] The companies also formed the SD Association
SD Association
(SDA), a non-profit organization, in January 2000 to promote and create SD Card standards.[3] SDA today has about 1,000 member companies
[...More...]

"SDXC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Consumer IR
Consumer IR, consumer infrared, or CIR, refers to a wide variety of devices employing the infrared electromagnetic spectrum for wireless communications. Most commonly found in television remote controls, infrared ports are equally ubiquitous in consumer electronics, such as PDAs, laptops, and computers. The functionality of CIR is as broad as the consumer electronics that carry it
[...More...]

"Consumer IR" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.