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Newsweek
Newsweek
Newsweek
is an American weekly magazine founded in 1933. Between 2008 and 2012, Newsweek
Newsweek
underwent internal and external contractions designed to shift the magazine's focus and audience while improving its finances. Instead, losses accelerated: revenue dropped 38 percent from 2007 to 2009. The revenue declines prompted an August 2010 sale by owner The Washington Post Company
The Washington Post Company
to audio pioneer Sidney Harman—for a purchase price of one dollar and an assumption of the magazine's liabilities.[3][4] In November 2010, Newsweek
Newsweek
merged with the news and opinion website The Daily Beast, forming The Newsweek
Newsweek
Daily Beast Company, after negotiations between the owners of the two publications. Tina Brown, The Daily Beast's editor-in-chief, served as the editor of both publications
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Editor-in-chief
An editor-in-chief, also known as lead editor, chief editor, managing or executive editor, is a publication's editorial leader who has final responsibility for its operations and policies.[1][2]Contents1 Description 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksDescription[edit] The editor-in-chief heads all departments of the organization and is held accountable for delegating tasks to staff members and managing them. The term is often used at newspapers, magazines, yearbooks, and television news programs. The editor-in-chief is commonly the link between the publisher or proprietor and the editorial stafplied to academic journals, where the editor-in-chief gives the ultimate decision whether a submitted manuscript will be published
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Abdulsalam Haykal
Abdulsalam Haykal (Arabic: عبد السّلام هيكل‎) (born July 14, 1978, in Damascus) is a Syrian technology and media entrepreneur, who lives and works in Damascus, Syria. In 2009, the World Economic Forum
World Economic Forum
named Haykal as a Young Global Leader, the first Syrian to receive this recognition.[1] Haykal is CEO of Transtek, an enterprise software development firm, and of Haykal Media, publisher of the business newsmagazine Aliqtisadi, and the English monthly Forward Magazine. The Report: Emerging Syria
Syria
2008 listed Haykal Media with its magazines and online media as one of three main players in the media sector in Syria.[2] Haykal is president of the Syrian Young Entrepreneurs Association (SYEA), an NGO formed as part of the reform process in Syria
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Magazine
A magazine is a publication, usually a periodical publication, which is printed or electronically published (sometimes referred to as an online magazine). Magazines are generally published on a regular schedule and contain a variety of content. They are generally financed by advertising, by a purchase price, by prepaid subscriptions, or a combination of the three. At its root, the word "magazine" refers to a collection or storage location. In the case of written publication, it is a collection of written articles
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Watergate Scandal
The Watergate scandal
Watergate scandal
was a major political scandal that occurred in the United States during the early 1970s, following a break-in by five men at the Democratic National Committee
Democratic National Committee
(DNC) headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
on June 17, 1972, and President Richard Nixon's administration's subsequent attempt to cover up its involvement. After the five burglars were caught and the conspiracy was discovered, Watergate was investigated by the United States Congress. Meanwhile, Nixon's administration resisted its probes, which led to a constitutional crisis.[1] The term Watergate, by metonymy, has come to encompass an array of clandestine and often illegal activities undertaken by members of the Nixon administration
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Secondary Education
Secondary education
Secondary education
covers two phases on the International Standard Classification of Education
Education
scale. Level 2 or lower secondary education (less common junior secondary education) is considered the second and final phase of basic education, and level 3 (upper) secondary education is the stage before tertiary education. Every country aims to provide basic education, but the systems and terminology remain unique to them. Secondary education
Secondary education
typically takes place after six years of primary education and is followed by higher education, vocational education or employment.[1] Like primary education, in most countries secondary education is compulsory, at least until the age of 16. Children typically enter the lower secondary phase around age 11
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Advanced Placement Program
Advanced Placement
Advanced Placement
(AP) is a program in the United States
United States
and Canada created by the College Board
College Board
which offers college-level curricula and examinations to high school students. American colleges and universities may grant placement and course credit to students who obtain high scores on the examinations. The AP curriculum for each of the various subjects is created for the College Board
College Board
by a panel of experts and college-level educators in that field of study. For a high school course to have the designation, the course must be audited by the College Board
College Board
to ascertain that it satisfies the AP curriculum
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IB Diploma Programme
The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) is a two-year educational programme primarily aimed at 16 to 18 year olds. The programme provides an internationally accepted qualification for entry into higher education and is recognized by many universities worldwide. It was developed in the early to mid-1960s in Geneva, Switzerland, by a group of international educators. After a six-year pilot programme ended in 1975, a bilingual diploma was established. Administered by the International Baccalaureate (IB), the IBDP is taught in schools in over 140 countries, in one of three languages: English, French, or Spanish. In order to participate, students must attend an IB school
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SAT
The SAT
SAT
(/ˌɛsˌeɪˈtiː/ ess-ay-TEE) is a standardized test widely used for college admissions in the United States. Introduced in 1926, its name and scoring have changed several times; originally called the Scholastic Aptitude Test, it was later called the Scholastic Assessment Test, then the SAT
SAT
I: Reasoning Test, then the SAT Reasoning Test, and now, simply the SAT. The SAT
SAT
is owned, developed, and published by the College
College
Board, a private, non-profit organization in the United States. It is administered on behalf of the College Board
College Board
by the Educational Testing Service,[3] which until recently developed the SAT
SAT
as well.[4] The test is intended to assess students' readiness for college
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ACT (examination)
The ACT (/eɪ siː tiː/; originally an abbreviation of American College Testing)[10] is a standardized test used for college admissions in the United States. It was first introduced in November 1959 by University of Iowa
University of Iowa
professor Everett Franklin Lindquist as a competitor to the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).[11] It is currently administered by ACT, a nonprofit organization of the same name.[10] The ACT originally consisted of four tests: English, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Natural Sciences
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Allen & Co
Allen & Company LLC is an American privately held boutique investment bank based at 711 Fifth Avenue, New York City.[1] The firm is known for its deliberate avoidance of publicity and specializes in the real estate, technology, media and entertainment sectors.[2][3]Contents1 History 2 Notable current employees 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] Founded in 1922 by Charles Robert Allen, Jr., he was soon joined by his brothers, Herbert A. Allen, Sr. and Harold Allen
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Photograph
A photograph or photo is an image created by light falling on a light-sensitive surface, usually photographic film or an electronic medium such as a CCD or a CMOS chip. Most photographs are created using a camera, which uses a lens to focus the scene's visible wavelengths of light into a reproduction of what the human eye would see. The process and practice of creating photographs is called photography
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Barry Diller
Barry Charles Diller (born February 2, 1942) is an American businessman. He is Chairman
Chairman
and Senior Executive of IAC/InterActiveCorp
IAC/InterActiveCorp
and Expedia, Inc.
Expedia, Inc.
and created the Fox Broadcasting Company and USA Broadcasting. Diller is a member of the Television Hall of Fame, having been inducted in 1994.[2][3]Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Paramount 2.2 Fox 2.3 USA Broadcasting 2.4 2000s3 "The Killer Dillers" 4 Personal life 5 Philanthropy 6 References 7 Further readingEarly life[edit] Diller was born into a Jewish
Jewish
household in San Francisco, California, and is the son of Reva (née Addison) and Michael Diller.[4][5] Career[edit] Diller began his career through a family connection[6] in the mailroom of the William Morris Agency
William Morris Agency
after dropping out of UCLA
UCLA
after one semester
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Milken Institute
The Milken Institute
Milken Institute
is an independent economic think tank based in Santa Monica, California. It publishes research and hosts conferences that apply market-based principles and financial innovations to social issues in the US and internationally
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Snipe Hunt
A snipe hunt is a type of practical joke, in existence in North America as early as the 1840s, in which an unsuspecting newcomer is duped into trying to catch a non-existent animal called a snipe. While snipe are an actual family of birds, the snipe hunt is a quest for an imaginary creature whose description varies. The target of the prank is led to an outdoor spot and given instructions for catching the snipe; these often include waiting in the dark and holding an empty bag or making noises to attract the prey. The others involved in the prank then leave the newcomer alone in the woods to discover the joke
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Bitcoin
Bitcoin
Bitcoin
(₿) is a cryptocurrency and worldwide payment system.[9]:3 It is the first decentralized digital currency, as the system works without a central bank or single administrator.[9]:1[10] The network is peer-to-peer and transactions take place between users directly, without an intermediary.[9]:4 These transactions are verified by network nodes through the use of cryptography and recorded in a public distributed ledger called a blockchain. Bitcoin
Bitcoin
was invented by an unknown person or group of people under the name Satoshi Nakamoto[11] and released as open-source software in 2009.[12] Bitcoins are created as a reward for a process known as mining. They can be exchanged for other currencies,[13] products, and services
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