HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

New York State Route 45
New York State Route 45 (NY 45) is a north–south state highway in central Rockland County, New York, in the United States. It spans 8.60 miles (13.84 km) from the village of Chestnut Ridge at the New Jersey–New York border, where it becomes County Route 73 (CR 73) in Bergen County, New Jersey, to U.S. Route 202 (US 202) in the town of Haverstraw. Though an interchange does exist between NY 45 and the Palisades Interstate Parkway, the route has no access to the New York State Thruway. NY 45 was originally designated as New York State Route 305 as part of the 1930 renumbering of state highways in New York
[...More...]

"New York State Route 45" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Open Access
Open access
Open access
(OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g
[...More...]

"Open Access" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Garden State Parkway
New Jersey
New Jersey
State Highway RoutesInterstate US State Scenic Byways← Route 440 444 Route 445 →The Garden State Parkway
Parkway
(GSP) is a 172.4-mile (277.5 km)[2] limited-access toll parkway that stretches the length of New Jersey from the New York line at Montvale to Cape May at the state's southernmost tip. Its name refers to New Jersey's nickname, the "Garden State". Most New Jerseyans refer to it as simply "the Parkway". The parkway's official, but unsigned, designation is Route 444. At its north end, the parkway becomes the Garden State Parkway
Parkway
Connector, a component of the New York State Thruway
New York State Thruway
system that connects to the Thruway mainline in Ramapo
[...More...]

"Garden State Parkway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

State Highway
A state highway, state road, or state route (and the equivalent provincial highway, provincial road, or provincial route) is usually either a road numbered by the state or province, falling below numbered national highways in the hierarchy (route numbers are used to aid navigation, and may or may not indicate ownership or maintenance); or a road maintained by the state or province, including both nationally numbered highways and un-numbered state highways. Depending on the state, state highway may be used for one meaning and state road or state route for the other. In some countries such as New Zealand, the word "state" is used in its sense of a nation
[...More...]

"State Highway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
[...More...]

"New York (state)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bergen County, New Jersey
Bergen County is the most populous county in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New Jersey.[4] As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county's population was 948,406, an increase of 4.8% from the 2010 United States Census,[3][6][7] which in turn represented an increase of 20,998 (2.4%) from the 884,118 counted in the 2000 Census.[8] Located in the northeastern corner of New Jersey
New Jersey
and its Gateway Region, Bergen County is part of the New York City Metropolitan Area
New York City Metropolitan Area
and is directly across the Hudson River
Hudson River
from Manhattan, to which it is connected by the George Washington
George Washington
Bridge. Bergen County is divided into 70 municipalities, but has no large cities
[...More...]

"Bergen County, New Jersey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New York State Thruway
The New York State Thruway, often called simply the Thruway, is a system of limited-access highways located within the state of New York in the United States. The system, known officially as the Governor Thomas E. Dewey
Thomas E. Dewey
Thruway for former New York Governor Thomas E. Dewey, is operated by the New York State Thruway Authority
New York State Thruway Authority
(NYSTA) and comprises 569.83 miles (917.05 km) of highway. The tolled mainline of the Thruway extends for 496.00 miles (798.23 km) from the New York City
New York City
line at Yonkers to the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
state line at Ripley by way of Albany, Syracuse, and Buffalo. According to the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association, the Thruway is the fifth busiest toll road in the United States.[3] A tolled highway connecting the major cities of New York was first proposed as early as the 1940s
[...More...]

"New York State Thruway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Allegany County, New York
Allegany County is a county in the southern tier of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 48,946.[1] Its county seat is Belmont.[2] Its name derives from a Delaware Indian (Lenape) word, applied by European-American
European-American
settlers of Western New York State to a trail that followed the Allegheny River; they also named the county after this. The county is bisected by the Genesee River, flowing north to its mouth on Lake Ontario. During the mid-nineteenth century, the Genesee Valley Canal was built to link southern markets to the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and Mohawk River. The county was also served by railroads, which soon superseded the canals in their capacity for carrying freight
[...More...]

"Allegany County, New York" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Reference Marker (New York)
In New York, a reference marker is a small green sign mounted approximately every one-tenth mile on highways maintained by the New York State Department of Transportation. This was initiated in response to the Highway Safety Act of 1966[1][not in citation given] enacted by Congress, in an effort to monitor traffic and identify high-accident locations. New York's system inventories and indexes all touring and reference routes, in addition to service and rest areas, ramps, and reservation roads. New York's system is similar to California's postmile system in maintaining the state's highways and route logs. The New York State Thruway Authority adopted its own reference system for the New York State Thruway system, including I-287 and I-84
[...More...]

"Reference Marker (New York)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

County Route 41 (Rockland County, New York)
County routes in Rockland County, New York, are maintained by the Rockland County highway department and signed with the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices-standard yellow-on-blue pentagon route marker. Most of the routes act as primary roads in the less developed areas and also serve to interconnect the various villages and hamlets of the county. Across the county, routes are numbered such that odd-numbered routes are north–south and increase in number from east to west, while even-numbered routes are east–west and increase from south to north. There are 63 current routes and seven routes no longer maintained by the county, making for a total of 70 routes. The longest routes are CR 33, CR 23, and CR 80, all at over ten miles (16 km). The shortest route is CR 118A in Tomkins Cove at .09 of a mile. There are also two routes that cross into Orange County and keep the same number from Rockland: CR 106 in Tuxedo and CR 72 in Sloatsburg
[...More...]

"County Route 41 (Rockland County, New York)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Orange County, New York
Orange County is a county located in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 372,813.[1] The county seat is Goshen.[2] This county was first created in 1683 and reorganized with its present boundaries in 1798.[3] Orange County is included in the New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area
[...More...]

"Orange County, New York" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Hillcrest, Rockland County, New York
Hillcrest is a hamlet incorporated in 1893 and census-designated place, in the town of Ramapo, Rockland County, New York, United States. It is located north of Spring Valley, east of Viola, south of New Square and New Hempstead, and west of New City. The population was 7,558 at the 2010 census.[1] It is a bedroom suburb of New York City, as many residents commute to employment in Manhattan (and, to a lesser extent, northern New Jersey) by bus (Red and Tan Lines), train (Metro-North Railroad) or automobile.[citation needed] It is primarily served by the Spring Valley post office.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Education 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] In the early 1900s, Hillcrest became a summer retreat for working-class families from New York City; the families could access Hillcrest by train from New Jersey (after ferrying across to the western shore of the Hudson)
[...More...]

"Hillcrest, Rockland County, New York" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

County Route 74 (Rockland County, New York)
County routes in Rockland County, New York, are maintained by the Rockland County highway department and signed with the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices-standard yellow-on-blue pentagon route marker. Most of the routes act as primary roads in the less developed areas and also serve to interconnect the various villages and hamlets of the county. Across the county, routes are numbered such that odd-numbered routes are north–south and increase in number from east to west, while even-numbered routes are east–west and increase from south to north. There are 63 current routes and seven routes no longer maintained by the county, making for a total of 70 routes. The longest routes are CR 33, CR 23, and CR 80, all at over ten miles (16 km). The shortest route is CR 118A in Tomkins Cove at .09 of a mile. There are also two routes that cross into Orange County and keep the same number from Rockland: CR 106 in Tuxedo and CR 72 in Sloatsburg
[...More...]

"County Route 74 (Rockland County, New York)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Hassidism
Hasidism, sometimes Hasidic Judaism (Hebrew: חסידות‎, translit. hasidut, [χaˈsidus]; originally, "piety"), is a Jewish religious group. It arose as a spiritual revival movement in contemporary Western Ukraine during the 18th century, and spread rapidly throughout Eastern Europe. Today, most affiliates reside in the United States, Israel, and the United Kingdom. Israel Ben Eliezer, the "Baal Shem Tov", is regarded as its founding father, and his disciples developed and disseminated it. Present-day Hasidism is a sub-group within Ultra-Orthodox ("Haredi") Judaism, and is noted for its religious conservatism and social seclusion
[...More...]

"Hassidism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New Square, New York
New Square (Yiddish: ניו סקווער‎, Hebrew: שיכון סקווירא‬) is an all- Hasidic
Hasidic
village in the town of Ramapo, Rockland County, New York, United States. It is located north of Hillcrest, east of Viola, south of New Hempstead, and west of New City. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 6,944.[2] Its inhabitants are predominantly members of the Skverer Hasidic
Hasidic
movement who seek to maintain a Hasidic
Hasidic
lifestyle disconnected from the secular world.Contents1 History 2 Culture 3 Economy 4 Geography 5 Demographics 6 Government and infrastructure6.1 Community norms7 Education 8 Controversies8.1 Fraudulent grant controversy9 Kiryas Square 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] New Square is named after the Ukrainian town Skvyra, where the Skverer Hasidim originated
[...More...]

"New Square, New York" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

County Route 80 (Rockland County, New York)
County routes in Rockland County, New York, are maintained by the Rockland County highway department and signed with the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices-standard yellow-on-blue pentagon route marker. Most of the routes act as primary roads in the less developed areas and also serve to interconnect the various villages and hamlets of the county. Across the county, routes are numbered such that odd-numbered routes are north–south and increase in number from east to west, while even-numbered routes are east–west and increase from south to north. There are 63 current routes and seven routes no longer maintained by the county, making for a total of 70 routes. The longest routes are CR 33, CR 23, and CR 80, all at over ten miles (16 km). The shortest route is CR 118A in Tomkins Cove at .09 of a mile. There are also two routes that cross into Orange County and keep the same number from Rockland: CR 106 in Tuxedo and CR 72 in Sloatsburg
[...More...]

"County Route 80 (Rockland County, New York)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.