HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

New York Review Books
New York Review Books (NYRB) is the publishing house of The New York Review of Books. Its imprints are New York Review Books Classics, New York Review Books Collections, The New York Review Children's Collection, New York Review Comics, and NYRB Lit. Description[edit] NYRB Classics is a list of fiction and non-fiction works for all ages and from around the world. Since its first volume, Richard Hughes's High Wind in Jamaica (1999), NYRB Classics has published hundreds of titles. Occasionally, it has published translations of works previously unavailable in English by writers including Euripides, Dante, Balzac
Balzac
and Chekhov. It also publishes fiction by more contemporary writers such as Vasily Grossman, Mavis Gallant, Upamanyu Chatterjee, Georges Simenon, Kenneth Fearing, and J. R. Ackerley
[...More...]

"New York Review Books" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Parent Company
A parent company is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operation by doing and influencing or electing its board of directors
[...More...]

"Parent Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

J. R. Ackerley
Joe Randolph "J. R." Ackerley[1] (4 November 1896 – 4 June 1967) was a British writer and editor. Starting with the BBC the year after its founding in 1927, he was promoted to literary editor of The Listener, its weekly magazine, where he served for more than two decades. He published many emerging poets and writers who became influential in Great Britain
[...More...]

"J. R. Ackerley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

LibraryThing
LibraryThing
LibraryThing
is a social cataloging web application for storing and sharing book catalogs and various types of book metadata. It is used by authors, individuals, libraries, and publishers. Based in Portland, Maine,[2] LibraryThing
LibraryThing
was developed by Tim Spalding and went live on August 29, 2005. As of December 2015, it has over 2,000,000 users and 100 million books catalogued.[3]Contents1 Features1.1 Social features 1.2 TinyCat2 Ownership 3 Publicity 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksFeatures[edit] The primary feature of LibraryThing
LibraryThing
("LT") is the cataloging of books, movies, music and other media by importing data from libraries through Z39.50 connections and from six Amazon.com
Amazon.com
stores
[...More...]

"LibraryThing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly
(PW) is an American weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers and literary agents. Published continuously since 1872, it has carried the tagline, “The International News Magazine of Book
Book
Publishing
Publishing
and Bookselling". With 51 issues a year, the emphasis today is on book reviews.[3] The magazine was founded by bibliographer Frederick Leypoldt in the late 1860s, and had various titles until Leypoldt settled on the name The Publishers' Weekly (with an apostrophe) in 1872. The publication was a compilation of information about newly published books, collected from publishers and from other sources by Leypoldt, for an audience of booksellers. By 1876, Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly
was being read by nine tenths of the booksellers in the country
[...More...]

"Publishers Weekly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Observer
The Observer is a British newspaper published on Sundays. In the same place on the political spectrum as its sister papers The Guardian
The Guardian
and The Guardian
The Guardian
Weekly, whose parent company Guardian Media Group Limited acquired it in 1993, it takes a social liberal or social democratic line on most issues. First published in 1791, it is the world's oldest Sunday newspaper.[4]Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Nineteenth century 1.3 Twentieth century 1.4 Twenty-first century2 Supplements and features 3 The Newsroom 4 Bans 5 Editors 6 Photographers 7 Awards 8 Conventions sponsored 9 Bibliography 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The first issue, published on 4 December 1791 by W.S. Bourne, was the world's first Sunday newspaper. Believing that the paper would be a means of wealth, Bourne instead soon found himself facing debts of nearly £1,600
[...More...]

"The Observer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

E-book
An electronic book (or e-book) is a book publication made available in digital form, consisting of text, images, or both, readable on the flat-panel display of computers or other electronic devices.[1] Although sometimes defined as "an electronic version of a printed book",[2] some e-books exist without a printed equivalent. Commercially produced and sold e-books are usually[dubious – discuss] intended to be read on dedicated e-reader devices. However, almost any sophisticated computer device that features a controllable viewing screen can also be used to read e-books, including desktop computers, laptops, tablets and smartphones. In the 2000s, there was a trend of print and e-book sales moving to the Internet[citation needed], where readers buy traditional paper books and e-books on websites using e-commerce systems
[...More...]

"E-book" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Imprint (trade Name)
An imprint of a publisher is a trade name under which it publishes a work. A single publishing company may have multiple imprints, often using the different names as brands to market works to various demographic consumer segments.[1] Description[edit] An imprint of a publisher is a trade name—a name that a business uses for trading commercial products or services—under which a work is published. Imprints typically have a defining character or mission. In some cases, the diversity results from the takeover of smaller publishers (or parts of their business) by a larger company. In the case of Barnes & Noble, imprints have been used to facilitate the venture of a bookseller into publishing.[2] Use[edit] A single publishing company may have multiple imprints, with the different imprints often used by the publisher to market works to different demographic consumer segments
[...More...]

"Imprint (trade Name)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mainstream
Mainstream is current thought that is widespread.[1][2] It includes all popular culture and media culture, typically disseminated by mass media
[...More...]

"Mainstream" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Freeman Dyson
Freeman John Dyson FRS (born 15 December 1923) is an English-born American theoretical physicist and mathematician
[...More...]

"Freeman Dyson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Larry McMurtry
Larry Jeff McMurtry (born June 3, 1936) is an American novelist, essayist, bookseller, and screenwriter whose work is predominantly set in either the Old West or in contemporary Texas.[1] His novels include Horseman, Pass By
Horseman, Pass By
(1962), The Last Picture Show
The Last Picture Show
(1966) and Terms of Endearment (1975), which were adapted into films earning 26 Academy Award nominations (10 wins). His 1985 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Lonesome Dove
Lonesome Dove
was adapted into a television miniseries that earned 18 Emmy Award
Emmy Award
nominations (seven wins), with the other three novels in his Lonesome Dove
Lonesome Dove
series adapted into three more miniseries, earning eight more Emmy nominations
[...More...]

"Larry McMurtry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kenneth Fearing
Kenneth Fearing (July 28, 1902 – June 26, 1961) was an American poet, novelist, and founding editor of Partisan Review. Literary critic Macha Rosenthal called him "the chief poet of the American Depression."[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Literary career 3 Personal life 4 Bibliography4.1 Poetry 4.2 Novels5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Fearing was born in Oak Park, Illinois, the son of Harry Lester Fearing, a successful Chicago attorney, and Olive Flexner Fearing. His parents divorced when he was a year old, and he was raised mainly by his aunt, Eva Fearing Scholl. He went to school at Oak Park and River Forest High School, and was editor of the student paper, as was his predecessor Ernest Hemingway
[...More...]

"Kenneth Fearing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Upamanyu Chatterjee
Upamanyu Chatterjee (Bengali: উপমন্যু চট্টোপাধ্যায়) (born 1959) is an Indian civil servant who currently serves as Joint Secretary to Government of India on the Petroleum and Natural Gas Regulatory Board. He is a 1983 batch Indian Administrative Service officer from Maharashtra Cadre.[1] He is a published author and best known for his novel English, August, also adapted into a film of the same title.Contents1 Major works 2 Awards 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksMajor works[edit] Chatterjee has written a handful of short stories of which "The Assassination of Indira Gandhi" and "Watching Them" are particularly noteworthy. His best-selling novel, English, August : An Indian story (subsequently made into a major film), was published in 1988 and has since been reprinted several times
[...More...]

"Upamanyu Chatterjee" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mavis Gallant
Mavis Leslie de Trafford Gallant, CC, née Young (11 August 1922 – 18 February 2014), was a Canadian writer who spent much of her life and career in France.[1] Best known as a short story writer, she also published novels, plays and essays.[1]Contents1 Origins 2 Marriage 3 Career 4 Honors 5 Death 6 Depiction of fascism 7 Critical assessment 8 Bibliography8.1 Short story collections 8.2 Novels 8.3 Plays 8.4 Non-fiction9 References 10 External linksOrigins[edit] Gallant was born in Montreal, Quebec, the only child of Albert Stewart Roy de Trafford Young, a Canadian furniture salesman and painter who was the son of an officer in the British Army,[2] and his wife, Benedictine Wiseman
[...More...]

"Mavis Gallant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.