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New York American
The New York Journal-American
New York Journal-American
was a daily newspaper published in New York City from 1937 to 1966. The Journal-American was the product of a merger between two New York newspapers owned by William Randolph Hearst: The New York American (originally the New York Journal, renamed American in 1901), a morning paper, and the New York Evening Journal, an afternoon paper. Both were published by Hearst from 1895 to 1937. The American and Evening Journal merged in 1937. The Journal-American was a publication with several editions in the afternoon and evening.Contents1 Circulation war 2 Comics 3 Reporters 4 Columnists 5 Staff 6 Photographs 7 Decline 8 Merger 9 Archives 10 Gallery 11 References 12 External linksCirculation war[edit] Joseph Pulitzer's younger brother Albert founded the New York Morning Journal in 1882. John R
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Benjamin De Casseres
Bela (son) Beker (son) Ashbel (son) Gera (son) Naaman (son) Ehi (son) Rosh (son) Muppim (son) Huppim (son) Ard (son) [1]Parents Jacob
Jacob
(father) Rachel
Rachel
(mother)RelativesReuben (half brother) Simeon (half brother) Levi
Levi
(half brother) Judah (half brother) Issachar (half brother) Zebulun (half brother) Dan (half brother) Naphtali (half brother) Gad (half brother) Asher
Asher
(half brother) Joseph
Joseph
(brother) Dinah
Dinah
(half sister) Benjamin
Benjamin
(Hebrew: בנימין, "Son of the right side") was the last-born of Jacob's thirteen children (12 sons and 1 daughter), and the second and last son of Rachel
Rachel
in Jewish, Christian
Christian
and Islamic tradition
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Judge Rummy
Judge Rummy
Judge Rummy
was an American comic strip by Tad Dorgan
Tad Dorgan
published from 1910 until 1922. [1] It featured an anthropomorphic dog. Between 1918 and 1922 the character was also subject of a series of short animated cartoons. Fictional biography[edit] Alexander Rumhauser,[2] better known as Judge Rummy, works as a court judge as his moniker implies. However, he is often seen doing other things like drinking alcohol and having affairs with women despite being married. Whenever he interacts with other characters, the strip often ends with at least one of them (including Judge Rummy) being upside down and showing only the feet (as shown in the strip above). He had a minor role in an earlier strip in which his best friend was the protagonist, but later strips began focusing on him. His wife is an obese lady who is four times his size
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Tim Tyler's Luck
Tim Tyler's Luck
Tim Tyler's Luck
was an adventure comic strip created by Lyman Young, elder brother of Blondie creator Chic Young. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, the strip ran from August 13, 1928, until August 1996. Lyman Young studied at the Chicago Art Institute and served in World War I before beginning his career as a cartoonist in 1924, taking over C. W. Kahles' strip The Kelly Kids. In 1927 he created The Kid Sister, a spin-off of The Kelly Kids.Contents1 Characters and story 2 Illustrators 3 Film 4 References 5 External linksCharacters and story[edit] When Tim Tyler's Luck
Tim Tyler's Luck
started in 1928, Tyler was living in an orphanage. However, he soon left the orphanage for the outside world. When he teamed with an older sidekick, Spud, they began globe-trotting for a series of international adventures
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Gene Ahern
Eugene Leslie Ahern (September 16, 1895 – March 6, 1960) was a cartoonist best known for his bombastic Major Hoople, a pompous character who appeared in the long-run syndicated gag panel Our Boarding House. Many of Ahern's comic strips took a surreal or screwball approach, notably The Squirrel Cage with its nonsensical catchphrase "Nov shmoz ka pop."Contents1 Biography1.1 Comic strips 1.2 The Nut Brothers 1.3 From Hoople to Puffle 1.4 Radio2 Personal life 3 Influence 4 References 5 Sources 6 Listen to 7 External linksBiography[edit] Ahern was born and raised in Chicago, attending public schools and working as a butcher boy, as noted in a 1929 newspaper article:Gene Ahern's path to the height of popularity in the comic world, started, strange as it may seem—in a meat market. True, he had been to art school before this, but it was his job as butcher's helper that gave real opportunity the first chance to knock
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The Phantom
The Phantom
The Phantom
is an American adventure comic strip, first published by Lee Falk
Lee Falk
in February 1936, now primarily published internationally by Frew Publications. The main character, the Phantom, is a fictional costumed crime-fighter who operates from the fictional African country of Bangalla. The character has been adapted for television, film and video games. The series began with a daily newspaper strip on February 17, 1936, followed by a color Sunday strip
Sunday strip
on May 28, 1939; both are still running as of 2018. In 1966, King Features stated that The Phantom
The Phantom
was being published in 583 newspapers worldwide.[1] At its peak, the strip was read by over 100 million people daily.[2][3] Falk worked on The Phantom
The Phantom
until his death in 1999; from then until the present, the comic strip has been written by Tony DePaul
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Jungle Jim
Jungle Jim
Jungle Jim
is the fictional hero of a series of jungle adventures in various media. The series began in 1934 as an American newspaper comic strip chronicling the adventures of Asia-based hunter Jim Bradley, who was nicknamed Jungle Jim
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Tillie The Toiler
Tillie the Toiler is a newspaper comic strip created by cartoonist Russ Westover
Russ Westover
who initially worked on his concept of a flapper character in a strip he titled Rose of the Office. With a title change, it sold to King Features Syndicate
King Features Syndicate
which carried the strip from 1921 to 1959. The daily strip began on Monday, January 3, 1921, followed by the Sunday page on October 10, 1922. For the Sunday page, Westover also did a topper strip, Van Swaggers, beginning in 1926, and he later did another topper, Aunt Min, in the 1930s. Westover retired in 1951 with his assistant Bob Gustafson
Bob Gustafson
then doing most of the writing and drawing. After Westover departed completely three years later, Gustafson's signature appeared on the strip beginning October 4, 1954
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Little Annie Rooney
Little Annie Rooney
Little Annie Rooney
is a comic strip about a young orphaned girl who traveled about with her dog, Zero. King Features Syndicate
King Features Syndicate
launched the strip on January 10, 1927, not long after it was apparent that the Chicago Tribune Syndicate had scored a huge hit with Little Orphan Annie
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Little Iodine
Little Iodine was an American Sunday comic strip, created by Jimmy Hatlo, which was syndicated by King Features and ran 1943 until 1985. The strip was a spin-off of They'll Do It Every Time, an earlier Hatlo creation.Contents1 Characters and story 2 Film adaptation 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksCharacters and story[edit] First seen during the 1930s in a supporting role in Hatlo's popular gag panel, They'll Do It Every Time, Little Iodine was the daughter of Henry Tremblechin and his wife, Cora. Her purpose was to serve as a pesky nuisance to the strip's star, Henry, and her behavior caused endless misery for her mild-mannered, easily unsettled father. However, Iodine proved to be popular in her own right, stealing the strip from her parents, so Hatlo promoted the character into her own strip in 1943. Iodine's antics gave the Sunday comics
Sunday comics
page a female precursor to Hank Ketcham's Dennis the Menace
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Barney Google And Snuffy Smith
Barney Google and Snuffy Smith, originally Take Barney Google, F'rinstance, is an American comic strip created by cartoonist Billy DeBeck. Since its debut on June 17, 1919, the strip has gained a large international readership, appearing in 900 newspapers in 21 countries. The initial appeal of the strip led to its adaptation to film, animation, popular song and television. It added several terms and phrases to the English language and inspired the 1923 hit tune "Barney Google (with the Goo-Goo-Googly Eyes)"[1] with lyrics by Billy Rose, as well as the 1923 record, "Come On, Spark Plug!" Barney Google himself, once the star of the strip and a very popular character in his own right, has been almost entirely phased out of the feature. An increasingly peripheral player in his own strip beginning in the late 1930s, Google was officially "written out" in 1954, although he would occasionally return for cameo appearances
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The Katzenjammer Kids
The Katzenjammer Kids
The Katzenjammer Kids
is an American comic strip created by Rudolph Dirks and drawn by Harold H. Knerr for 35 years (1914 to 1949).[2] It debuted December 12, 1897 in the American Humorist, the Sunday supplement of William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal. Dirks was the first cartoonist to regularly express dialogue in comic characters through the use of speech balloons.[3] After a series of legal battles between 1912 and 1914, Dirks left the Hearst organization and began a new strip, first titled Hans and Fritz and then The Captain and the Kids. It featured the same characters seen in The Katzenjammer Kids, which was continued by Knerr. The two separate versions of the strip competed with each other until 1979, when The Captain and the Kids ended its six-decade run
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Tad Dorgan
Thomas J. Dorgan Father Anna Dorgan Mother1919 advertisement with DorganThomas Aloysius Dorgan (April 29, 1877 – May 2, 1929), also known as Tad Dorgan, was an American cartoonist who signed his drawings as Tad. He is known for his cartoon panel Indoor Sports and the many words and expressions he added to the language.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Strips and panels 3 Slang 4 Life in Great Neck 5 Books 6 Awards 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Dorgan was born in San Francisco
San Francisco
on April 29, 1877.[2] He was one of at least 11 children[3]—six sons and five daughters – of Thomas J. and Anna Dorgan.[4] His brother John L. "Ike" Dorgan (born April 1879) was publicity manager for the Madison Square Garden, and his brother Richard W. "Dick" Dorgan (born September 1892) was an illustrator and cartoonist. Polytechnic High School teachers Rosey Murdoch and Maria Van Vieck recognized and encouraged Tad's talent as an artist
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Popeye
E. C. Segar
E. C

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The Little King
The Little King
The Little King
was an American gag-a-day comic strip created by Otto Soglow, telling its stories in a style using images and very few words, as in pantomime.Contents1 Publication history 2 Format 3 Theatrical shorts 4 Collections 5 References 6 External linksPublication history[edit] Soglow's character first appeared on June 7, 1930 in The New Yorker and soon showed signs of becoming a successful strip
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Grandma (comic Strip)
Grandma was a comic strip by Charles Kuhn
Charles Kuhn
that began April 14, 1947. It was originally distributed by Duke Richardson's Indianapolis-based syndicate, Richardson Feature Service. A year later, Grandma was picked up by King Features Syndicate
King Features Syndicate
which distributed it from June 28, 1948 until 1969. He usually signed the strip "Chas. Kuhn".Contents1 Characters and story 2 Sunday strip 3 Awards 4 References 5 External linksCharacters and story[edit] The strip depicted humorous events in the life of a friendly, fun-loving woman known to her friends and neighbors only as Grandma. As comics historian Don Markstein described the character:Grandma was known by no other name, to children and grownups alike, despite the fact that she gave no evidence of having actual progeny of her own
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