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New School Of Social Research
The New School
New School
is a private non-profit research university centered in Manhattan, New York City, USA, located mostly in Greenwich Village. It was founded in 1919 as The New School
New School
for Social Research, an institution dedicated to academic freedom and intellectual inquiry, serving as a home for progressive thinkers. Since then, the school has grown to house five divisions within the university. These include the Parsons School of Design, the Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts, The New School
New School
for Social Research, the College of Performing Arts, and the Schools of Public Engagement
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New School (other)
The New School
The New School
is a New York City university. New School may also refer to:Educational institutions The New School
The New School
at West Heath, United Kingdom The New School
The New School
of Northern Virginia, United States The New School
The New School
Foundation, Norway NewSchool of Architecture and Design, California, United StatesOther uses The New School
The New School
(album), by The Tough Alliance New school hip hop, a period in hip hop music Newschool skiing New school (tattoo), a style and movement in tattooing. New School Presbyterians, a US Christian denomination existing after the 1837 Old School–New School Controversy and the remerger with the Old School Presbyterians after ~1870.This disambiguation page lists articles about schools, colleges, or other educational institutions which are associated with the same title
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Public Policy
Public policy is the principled guide to action taken by the administrative executive branches of the state with regard to a class of issues, in a manner consistent with law and institutional customs.Contents1 Overview 2 Government
Government
actions and process 3 Academic discipline 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingOverview[edit] The foundation of public policy is composed of national constitutional laws and regulations. Further substrates include both judicial interpretations and regulations which are generally authorized by legislation
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World Policy Institute
The World Policy Institute is a New York-based research institute which focuses on the challenges and opportunities of an increasingly connected world. World Policy Journal, fellows, events, and projects provide channels for supporters, experts, and citizens to identify, debate, and develop constructive policy solutions.[2] History[edit] The World Policy Institute was founded in 1961 in New York City. The original name was Fund for Education Concerning World Peace through World Law. The origin goes back to the movement of moderate internationalists, which started after World War II. The founders of the institute, H. B. Hollins, a banker, and C. Douglas Dillon, banker and public servant, were influenced by Grenville Clark. Both looked for support from international political figures to prevent future massacres and destruction. In 1963, the name of the institute was shortened to World Law Fund
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The Vera List Center For Art And Politics
The Vera List Center for Art and Politics (VLC) at The New School, founded in 1992 and named in honor of the late philanthropist Vera G. List, organizes public events that respond to the role of the arts in society and their relationship to the sociopolitical climate in which they are created. It remains the only organization with the exclusive mission to investigate the intersection for art and politics. Its director is Carin Kuoni. [1]Contents1 Mission 2 Biennial Focus Theme 3 Public Events 4 Website 5 Vera List Center Prize 6 Recipients 7 Publications7.1 Entry Points: The Vera List Center Field Guide on Art and Social Justice, No
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List Of New School People
The list of New School people includes notable students, alumni, faculty, administrators and trustees of the New School
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Social Science
Social science
Social science
is a major category of academic disciplines, concerned with society and the relationships among individuals within a society. It in turn has many branches, each of which is considered a social science. The social sciences include, but are not limited to: anthropology, archaeology, economics, history, human geography, jurisprudence, linguistics, political science , psychology, public health, and sociology. The term is also sometimes used to refer specifically to the field of sociology, the original 'science of society', established in the 19th century. A more detailed list of sub-disciplines within the social sciences can be found at Outline of social science. Positivist
Positivist
social scientists use methods resembling those of the natural sciences as tools for understanding society, and so define science in its stricter modern sense
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Liberal Arts
Liberal arts education
Liberal arts education
(Latin: liberalis, free and ars, art or principled practice) can claim to be the oldest programme of higher education in Western history. It has its origin in the attempt to discover first principles - 'those universal principles which are the condition of the possibility of the existence of anything and everything'.[1] The liberal arts are those subjects or skills that in classical antiquity were considered essential for a free person (Latin: liberalis, "worthy of a free person")[2] to know in order to take an active part in civic life, something that (for Ancient Greece) included participating in public debate, defending oneself in court, serving on juries, and most importantly, military service
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Humanities
Humanities
Humanities
are academic disciplines that study aspects of human society and culture. In the renaissance, the term contrasted with divinity and referred to what is now called classics, the main area of secular study in universities at the time
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Architecture
Architecture
Architecture
is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures.[3] Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements. The term architecture is also used metaphorically to refer to the design of organizations and other abstract concepts
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Fine Arts
In European academic traditions, fine art is art developed primarily for aesthetics or beauty, distinguishing it from applied art, which also has to serve some practical function, such as pottery or most metalwork. Historically, the five main fine arts were painting, sculpture, architecture, music, and poetry, with performing arts including theatre and dance.[1] Today, the fine arts commonly include additional forms, such as film, photography, video production/editing, design, sequential art, conceptual art, and printmaking. One definition of fine art is "a visual art considered to have been created primarily for aesthetic and intellectual purposes and judged for its beauty and meaningfulness, specifically, painting, sculpture, drawing, watercolor, graphics, and architecture."[2] In that sense, there are conceptual differences between the fine arts and the applied arts
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Design
Design
Design
is the creation of a plan or convention for the construction of an object, system or measurable human interaction (as in architectural blueprints, engineering drawings, business processes, circuit diagrams, and sewing patterns).[1] Design
Design
has different connotations in different fields (see design disciplines below). In some cases, the direct construction of an object (as in pottery, engineering, management, coding, and graphic design) is also considered to use design thinking. Designing often necessitates considering the aesthetic, functional, economic, and sociopolitical dimensions of both the design object and design process. It may involve considerable research, thought, modeling, interactive adjustment, and re-design
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Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
is the science of behavior and mind, including conscious and unconscious phenomena, as well as thought. It is an academic discipline of immense scope and diverse interests that, when taken together, seek an understanding of the emergent properties of brains, and all the variety of epiphenomena they manifest. As a social science it aims to understand individuals and groups by establishing general principles and researching specific cases.[1][2] In this field, a professional practitioner or researcher is called a psychologist and can be classified as a social, behavioral, or cognitive scientist
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Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
is the support for or advocacy of improvement of society by reform.[1] As a philosophy, it is based on the Idea of Progress, which asserts that advancements in science, technology, economic development, and social organization are vital to the improvement of the human condition. Progressivism
Progressivism
became highly significant during the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
in Europe, out of the belief that Europe
Europe
was demonstrating that societies could progress in civility from uncivilized conditions to civilization through strengthening the basis of empirical knowledge as the foundation of society.[2] Figures of the Enlightenment believed that progress had universal application to all societies and that these ideas would spread across the world from Europe.[2] The meanings of progressivism have varied over time and from different perspectives
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Schools Of Public Engagement (The New School)
The Schools of Public Engagement at The New School is one of five academic divisions that compose The New School, a private university located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City. It includes, the Bachelor's Program for Adults and Transfer Students, Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy founded in 1964, School of Media Studies, Creative Writing Program and School of LanguagesContents1 History 2 Growth and change 3 The 1990s and after 4 Academics 5 Degrees 6 Schools6.1 Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy7 Online learning 8 Campus 9 Notable alumni 10 Accreditation 11 See also 12 External links 13 See also 14 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Schools of Public Engagement at The New School is the direct successor of the original institution making it the oldest division of The New School having been founded in 1919
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École Libre Des Hautes études
The École Libre des Hautes Études (lit. ‘Free School for Advanced Studies’) was a "university-in-exile" for French academics in New York during the Second World War. It was chartered by the French (the Free French) and Belgian governments-in-exile and located at the New School for Social Research
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