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New Philology
New Philology
Philology
generally refers to a branch of Mexican ethnohistory and philology that uses colonial-era native language texts written by Indians to construct history from the indigenous point of view. The name New Philology
Philology
was coined by James Lockhart to describe work that he and his doctoral students and scholarly collaborators in history, anthropology, and linguistics had pursued since the mid-1970s.[1] Lockhart published a great many essays elaborating on the concept and content of the New Philology
Philology
and Matthew Restall published a description of it in the Latin American Research Review.[2] The techniques of the New Philology
Philology
has also been applied in other disciplines such as European medieval studies.[3] Some historians publishing in the New Philology
Philology
tradition are James Lockhart, S.L
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Spanish Conquest Of Yucatán
Yucatán
Yucatán
(Spanish pronunciation: [ɟ͡ʝukaˈtan] ( listen)), officially the Free and Sovereign State of Yucatán
Yucatán
(Spanish: Estado Libre y Soberano de Yucatán), is one of the 31 states which, with Mexico City, comprise the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico. It is divided in 106 municipalities, and its capital city is Mérida. It is located on the north part of the Yucatán
Yucatán
Peninsula. It is bordered by the states of Campeche
Campeche
to the southwest and Quintana Roo to the southeast, with the Gulf of Mexico
Mexico
off its north coast. Before the arrival of Spaniards
Spaniards
to the Yucatán
Yucatán
Peninsula, the name of this region was Mayab.[12] In the Mayan language, "ma' ya'ab" is translated as "a few"
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Joaquín García Icazbalceta
Joaquín García Icazbalceta
Joaquín García Icazbalceta
(August 21, 1824 – November 26, 1894) was a Mexican philologist and historian. He edited writings by Mexican writers who preceded him, wrote a biography of Juan de Zumárraga, and translated William H. Prescott's Conquest of Mexico. His works on Colonial Mexico
Mexico
continue to be cited today.Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 Death and legacy 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] García Icazbalceta was born in Mexico
Mexico
City to a wealthy Spanish family. The family was exiled to Spain
Spain
in 1825, shortly after the recognition of Mexican independence, by an act of Congress, and was not able to return until seven years later. He was educated by tutors and through independent reading. He learned several Continental languages and delved into the study of Iberoamerica
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Charles Dibble
Charles E. Dibble (18 August 1909 – 30 November 2002)[1] was an American academic, anthropologist, linguist, and scholar of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures. A former Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the University of Utah, Dibble retired in 1978 after an association with the university as lecturer and researcher spanning four decades.[2] Post-retirement Dibble continued to conduct and publish research in his area of expertise, studies of Mesoamerican historical literature and the historiography of conquest-era Mesoamerican cultures, in particular those of the Aztec and others of the central Mexican altiplano. Among many contributions to the field Dibble is perhaps most recognised for his collaboration with colleague Arthur J.O. Anderson, producing the modern annotated translation into English of the volumes of the Florentine Codex. Born in Layton, Utah,[3] Dibble attended the University of Utah, obtaining a B.A. in history in 1936
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Culhuacán (altepetl)
Culhuacan or Cohuatlichan (Classical Nahuatl: Cōlhuàcān [koːlˈwaʔkaːn]) was one of the Nahuatl-speaking pre-Columbian city-states of the Valley of Mexico
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Codex
A codex (/ˈkoʊdɛks/) (from the Latin
Latin
caudex for "trunk of a tree" or block of wood, book), plural codices (/ˈkɒdɪsiːz/), is a book constructed of a number of sheets of paper, vellum, papyrus, or similar materials. The term is now usually only used of manuscript books, with hand-written contents,[1] but describes the format that is now near-universal for printed books in the Western world. The book is usually bound by stacking the pages and fixing one edge, and using a cover thicker than the sheets. Some codices are continuously folded like a concertina. The alternative to paged codex format for a long document is the continuous scroll. Examples of folded codices include the Maya codices. Sometimes people use the term for a book-style format, including modern printed books but excluding folded books. The Romans developed the form from wooden writing tablets
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Mesoamerican
Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
is an important historical region and cultural area in the Americas, extending from approximately central Mexico
Mexico
through Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and northern Costa Rica, and within which pre-Columbian societies flourished before the Spanish colonization of the Americas
Americas
in the 15th and 16th centuries.[1][2] It is one of six areas in the world where ancient civilization arose independently, and the second in the Americas
Americas
along with Norte Chico (Caral-Supe) in present-day northern coastal Peru. As a cultural area, Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
is defined by a mosaic of cultural traits developed and shared by its indigenous cultures
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Charles Gibson
Charles deWolf "Charlie" Gibson (born March 9, 1943) is a retired United States broadcast television anchor and journalist. Gibson was a host of Good Morning America from 1987 to 2006, and the anchor of World News with Charles Gibson from 2006 to 2009.[1] In 1965, Gibson worked as the news director for Princeton University's student-run radio station, a radio producer for RKO, and a reporter for local television stations
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Penn State University
The Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State University (commonly referred to as Penn State or PSU) is a state-related, land-grant, doctoral university with campuses and facilities throughout Pennsylvania. Founded in 1855, the university has a stated threefold mission of teaching, research, and public service. Its instructional mission[12] includes undergraduate, graduate, professional and continuing education offered through resident instruction and online delivery. Its University Park campus, the flagship campus, lies within the Borough of State College and College Township. It has two law schools: Penn State Law, on the school's University Park campus, and Dickinson Law, located in Carlisle, 90 miles south of State College. The College of Medicine is located in Hershey
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Bernardino De Sahagún
Bernardino de Sahagún
Sahagún
(Spanish: [bernarˈðino ðe saaˈɣun]; c. 1499 – October 23, 1590) was a Franciscan
Franciscan
friar, missionary priest and pioneering ethnographer who participated in the Catholic evangelization of colonial New Spain
New Spain
(now Mexico). Born in Sahagún, Spain, in 1499, he journeyed to New Spain
New Spain
in 1529. He learned Nahuatl and spent more than 50 years in the study of Aztec
Aztec
beliefs, culture and history. Though he was primarily devoted to his missionary task, his extraordinary work documenting indigenous worldview and culture has earned him the title as “the first anthropologist."[1][2] He also contributed to the description of the Aztec
Aztec
language Nahuatl
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Occidental College
Occidental College
Occidental College
is a private liberal arts college located in the Eagle Rock neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Founded in 1887 by clergy and members of the Presbyterian
Presbyterian
Church, it is one of the oldest liberal arts colleges on the West Coast. Occidental College
Occidental College
is often referred to as "Oxy" for short.[4] In 2017, the Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings placed Occidental 27th on its list of the top 100 liberal arts colleges in the United States.[5] The New York Times
The New York Times
ranked Occidental No. 28 on its 2017 list of the most economically diverse U.S
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University Of Oregon
The University of Oregon
Oregon
(also referred to as UO, U of O or Oregon) is a public flagship[6][7][8] research university in Eugene, Oregon. Founded in 1876,[9] the institution's 295-acre campus is along the Willamette River.[10] Since July 2014, UO has been governed by the Board of Trustees of the University of Oregon.[11] The university has a Carnegie Classification of "highest research activity"[12] and has 19 research centers and institutes.[13] UO was admitted to the
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Tulane University
Tulane University
Tulane University
is a private, nonsectarian research university in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States. It is considered the top university and the most selective institution of higher education in the state of Louisiana.[5][6][7] From a nationwide perspective, U.S. News & World Report categorizes Tulane as "most selective," which is the highest degree of selectivity the magazine offers.[8] The school is known to attract a geographically diverse student body, with 85% of undergraduate students coming from over 300 miles (480 kilometers) away.[9] The school was founded as a public medical college in 1834, and became a comprehensive university in 1847. The institution was made private under the endowments of Paul Tulane
Paul Tulane
and Josephine Louise Newcomb in 1884
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University Of California Santa Barbara
The University of California, Santa Barbara
University of California, Santa Barbara
(commonly referred to as UC Santa Barbara or UCSB) is a public research university and one of the 10 campuses of the University of California
University of California
system. The main campus is located on a 1,022-acre (414 ha) site near Isla Vista, California, United States, 8 miles (13 km) from Santa Barbara and 100 miles (160 km) northwest of Los Angeles. Tracing its roots back to 1891 as an independent teachers' college, UCSB joined the University of California
University of California
system in 1944 and is the third-oldest general-education campus in the system. UCSB is one of America's Public Ivy
Public Ivy
universities, which recognizes top public research universities in the United States
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Medieval
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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