HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

New Year's Day
New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January
January
1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar. In pre-Christian Rome under the Julian calendar, the day was dedicated to Janus, god of gateways and beginnings, for whom January
January
is also named
[...More...]

picture info

September
September
September
is the ninth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars, the third of four months to have a length of 30 days, and the fourth of five months to have a length of less than 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
September
September
is the seasonal equivalent of March in the Southern Hemisphere. In the Northern hemisphere, the beginning of the meteorological autumn is on 1 September. In the Southern hemisphere, the beginning of the meteorological spring is on 1 September.[1]  September
September
marks the beginning of the ecclesiastical year in the Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church
[...More...]

Kalends
The calends or kalends (Latin: kalendae) is the first day of every month in the Roman calendar. The English word calendar is derived from this word.Contents1 Use 2 Computation 3 Expressions 4 References 5 Further readingUse[edit] The Romans called the first day of every month the calends, signifying the start of a new lunar phase. On this day, the pontiffs would announce the number of days until the next month at the Curia Calabra; in addition, debtors had to pay off their debts on this day. These debts were inscribed in the kalendaria, effectively an accounting book. Modern calendars count the number of days after the first of each month; by contrast, the Roman calendar
Roman calendar
measured the number of days until certain upcoming dates (such as the calends, the nones or the ides). To calculate the day of the calends of the upcoming month, counting the number of days remaining in the current month is necessary, then adding two to that number
[...More...]

March 1
March
March
1 is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 305 days remaining until the end of the year
[...More...]

March 25
March
March
25 is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 281 days remaining until the end of the year
[...More...]

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

picture info

Roman Legend
Roman mythology
Roman mythology
is the body of traditional stories pertaining to ancient Rome's legendary origins and religious system, as represented in the literature and visual arts of the Romans. "Roman mythology" may also refer to the modern study of these representations, and to the subject matter as represented in the literature and art of other cultures in any period. The Romans usually treated their traditional narratives as historical, even when these have miraculous or supernatural elements. The stories are often concerned with politics and morality, and how an individual's personal integrity relates to his or her responsibility to the community or Roman state. Heroism is an important theme
[...More...]

Kingdom Of Rome
Kingdom
Kingdom
may refer to:Contents1 Monarchy 2 Taxonomy 3 Arts and media3.1 Television 3.2 Music 3.3 Other media4 People 5 Other 6 See alsoMonarchy[edit] Further information: List of kingdoms A type of monarchy:A realm ruled bya king a queen regnantTaxonomy[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(taxonomy), a category in biological taxonomyArts and media[edit] Television[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(UK TV series), a 2007 British television drama starring Stephen Fry Kingdom
Kingdom
(U.S
[...More...]

picture info

Numa Pompilius
Numa Pompilius
Numa Pompilius
(/ˈnuːmə pɒmˈpɪliəs, ˈnjuː-/; 753–673 BC; reigned 715–673 BC) was the legendary second king of Rome,[1] succeeding Romulus. He was of Sabine
Sabine
origin, and many of Rome's most important religious and political institutions are attributed to him.Contents1 Genealogy 2 Kingship 3 Agent of the gods 4 Institutions attributed to Numa 5 Story of the books of Numa 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources8.1 Primary 8.2 Secondary9 External linksGenealogy[edit] According to Plutarch, Numa was the youngest of Pomponius's[2] four sons, born on the day of Rome's founding (traditionally, 21 April 753 BC). He lived a severe life of discipline and banished all luxury from his home. Titus Tatius, king of the Sabines and a colleague of Romulus, gave in marriage his only daughter, Tatia, to Numa. After 13 years of marriage, Tatia died, precipitating Numa's retirement to the countryside
[...More...]

picture info

Ianuarius
Ianuarius, fully Mensis Ianuarius
Ianuarius
( Latin
Latin
for the " January
January
Month", i.e., "The Month of Janus"), was the first month of the ancient Roman calendar, from which the Julian and Gregorian month of January derived. It was followed by Februarius
Februarius
("February"). In the calendars of the Roman Republic, Ianuarius
Ianuarius
had 29 days. Two days were added when the calendar was reformed under Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
in 45 BCE. In the oldest Roman calendar, which the Romans believed to have been instituted by their legendary founder Romulus, the first month was Martius ("Mars' month", March), and the calendar year had only ten months
[...More...]

picture info

Februarius
Februarius
Februarius
or February, fully the "February month" (Latin: mensis Februarius), was the shortest month of the Roman calendar. It was eventually placed second in order, preceded by Ianuarius
Ianuarius
("January") and followed by Martius ("Mars' month", March). In the oldest Roman calendar, which the Romans believed to have been instituted by their legendary founder Romulus, March was the first month, and the calendar year had only ten months in all. Ianuarius
Ianuarius
and Februarius
Februarius
were supposed to have been added by Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome, originally at the end of the year
[...More...]

picture info

Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium.[4] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language in Italy, and subsequently throughout the western Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

December 25
December
December
25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are six days remaining until the end of the year
[...More...]

picture info

Roman Consul
A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and ancient Romans considered the consulship the highest level of the cursus honorum (an ascending sequence of public offices to which politicians aspired). Each year, the citizens of Rome
Rome
elected two consuls to serve jointly for a one-year term. The consuls alternated in holding imperium each month, and a consul's imperium extended over Rome, Italy, and the provinces
[...More...]

picture info

List Of Roman Consuls
This is a list of consuls known to have held office, from the beginning of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
to the latest use of the title in Imperial times, together with those magistrates of the Republic who were appointed in place of consuls, or who superseded consular authority for a limited period.Contents1 Background1.1 Republican consuls 1.2 Other magistrates included 1.3 The consulship in imperial times 1.4 Chronology 1.5 Consules prior and posterior 1.6 Other lists of consuls2 List2.1 Key2.1.1
[...More...]

Revolt Of Lepidus
Lepidus may refer to: Roman politicians: Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (triumvir), a member of the Second Triumvirate Various other politicians named Marcus Aemilius LepidusIn biology: Lepidus (genus)
Lepidus (genus)
a th
[...More...]

.