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New Testament
The New Testament
New Testament
(Greek: Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Latin: Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament
New Testament
discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians
Christians
regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The New Testament
New Testament
(in whole or in part) has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity
Christianity
around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology
Christian theology
and morality
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Apocalypse
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianismBook of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
Resurrection
of the deadGog and Magog Messianic Agev t e Apocalypse
Apocalypse
depicted in Christian Orthodox traditional fresco scenes in Osogovo Monastery, Republic of MacedoniaSt. John at Patmos: the receiving of an apocalyptic visionAn apocalypse (Ancient Greek: ἀποκάλυψις apokálypsis, from ἀπό and καλύπτω, literally meaning "an uncovering"[1]) is a disclosure of knowledge or revelation
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Creed
A creed (also known as a confession, symbol, or statement of faith) is a statement of the shared beliefs of a religious community in the form of a fixed formula summarizing core tenets. One of the most widely used creeds in Christianity
Christianity
is the Nicene Creed, first formulated in AD 325 at the First Council of Nicaea. It was based on Christian understanding of the Canonical Gospels, the letters of the New Testament
New Testament
and to a lesser extent the Old Testament. Affirmation of this creed, which describes the Trinity, is generally taken as a fundamental test of orthodoxy for most Christian denominations.[1] The Apostles' Creed
Apostles' Creed
is also broadly accepted
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Christian Church
The Christian
Christian
Church is an ecclesiological term generally used by Protestants to refer to the whole group of people belonging to the Christianity
Christianity
throughout history. In this understanding, the "Christian Church" does not refer to a particular Christian denomination
Christian denomination
but to the body of all believers. Some Christian
Christian
traditions, however, believe that the term " Christian
Christian
Church" or "Church" applies only to a specific historic Christian
Christian
body or institution (e.g., the Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church, the Non-Chalcedonian Churches of Oriental Orthodoxy, or the Assyrian Church of the East)
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The Gospel
In Christianity, the Gospel
Gospel
(Greek: εὐαγγέλιον euangélion; Old English: gospel), or the Good News, is the news of the coming of the Kingdom of God
Kingdom of God
(Mark 1:14-15), and of Jesus's death on the cross and resurrection to restore people's relationship with God. It may also include the descent of the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
upon believers and the second coming of Jesus. The message of good news is described as a narrative in the four canonical gospels. The message of good news is described as theology in many of the New Testament
New Testament
letters
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God In Christianity
God
God
in Christianity
Christianity
is the eternal being who created and preserves all things
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Epistle
An epistle (/ɪˈpɪsəl/; Greek ἐπιστολή, epistolē, "letter") is a writing directed or sent to a person or group of people, usually an elegant and formal didactic letter. The epistle genre of letter-writing was common in ancient Egypt as part of the scribal-school writing curriculum. The letters in the New Testament from Apostles to Christians are usually referred to as epistles
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New Covenant
The New Covenant
New Covenant
(Hebrew ברית חדשה‬  berit hadashah (help·info); Greek διαθήκη καινή diatheke kaine) is a biblical interpretation originally derived from a phrase in the Book of Jeremiah, in the Hebrew Bible. It is often thought of as an eschatological (ultimate destiny of Humanity) Messianic Age
Messianic Age
or world to come and is related to the biblical concept of the Kingdom of God. Generally, Christians believe that the promised New Covenant
New Covenant
was instituted at the Last Supper
Last Supper
as part of the Eucharist,[1] which in the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
includes the New Commandment. Based on the Bible teaching that, "For where a testament is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator
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Second Epistle To The Corinthians
The Second Epistle
Epistle
to the Corinthians, often written as 2 Corinthians, is a Pauline epistle
Pauline epistle
and the eighth book of the New Testament
New Testament
of the Bible
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First Epistle To The Corinthians
The First Epistle
Epistle
to the Corinthians (Ancient Greek: Α΄ ᾽Επιστολὴ πρὸς Κορινθίους), usually referred to simply as First Corinthians and often written 1 Corinthians, is one of the Pauline epistles
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Epistle To Titus
The Epistle
Epistle
of Paul to Titus, usually referred to simply as Titus, is one of the three Pastoral Epistles
Pastoral Epistles
(along with 1 Timothy and 2 Timothy) in the New Testament, historically attributed to Paul the Apostle but now considered by most scholars to have been written by someone else.[1] It is addressed to Saint Titus
Saint Titus
and describes the requirements and duties of elders and bishops.[2]Contents1 Recipient 2 Composition2.1 Pauline authenticity 2.2 Opposed to Pauline authenticity3 Epimenides paradox 4 False teachers 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksRecipient[edit] Not mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles, Saint Titus
Saint Titus
was noted in Galatians (cf. Gal. 2:1, 3) where Paul wrote of journeying to Jerusalem with Barnabas, accompanied by Titus
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First Epistle Of Peter
The First Epistle
Epistle
of Peter, usually referred to simply as First Peter and often written 1 Peter, is a book of the New Testament. The author presents himself as Peter the Apostle, and, following Roman Catholic tradition, the epistle has been held to have been written during his time as bishop of Rome or Bishop
Bishop
of Antioch, though neither title is used in the epistle. The text of the letter states that it was written from Babylon. The letter is addressed to various churches in Asia Minor suffering religious persecution.Contents1 Authorship 2 Audience 3 Outline 4 Context4.1 Social discrimination of Christians 4.2 Official persecution of Christians5 The Harrowing of Hell 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksAuthorship[edit] Main article: Authorship of the Petrine epistles The authorship of 1 Peter has traditionally been attributed to the Apostle Peter because it bears his name and identifies him as its author (1:1)
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Son Of God (Christianity)
The terms "son of God" and "son of the LORD" are found in several passages of the Old Testament. In Christianity, the title Son of God refers to the status of Jesus
Jesus
as the divine son of God
God
the Father
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First Epistle To The Thessalonians
The First Epistle
Epistle
to the Thessalonians, usually referred to simply as First Thessalonians (written 1 Thessalonians and abbreviated 1 Thess.[1] or 1 Thes.), is a book from the New Testament
New Testament
of the Christian Bible
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Old Testament
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t ePart of a series onChristianityJesus Christ
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Second Epistle To Timothy
In the New Testament, the Second Epistle
Epistle
of Paul to Timothy, usually referred to simply as Second Timothy and often written 2 Timothy, is one of the three Pastoral Epistles
Pastoral Epistles
traditionally attributed to Saint Paul.[1] The three epistles are called "pastoral" because they relate to the conduct of church leaders, thought of as pastors (literally shepherds).[2] It is traditionally considered to be the last epistle he wrote before his death
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