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Nevsky Prospect
Nevsky Prospect
Nevsky Prospect
(Russian: Не́вский проспе́кт, tr. Nevsky Prospekt, IPA: [ˈnʲɛfskʲɪj prɐˈspʲɛkt]) is the main street in the city of St. Petersburg, Russia, named after the 13th-century Russian prince Alexander Nevsky
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Elisseeff Emporium
Elisseeff Emporium in St. Petersburg is a large retail and entertainment complex, including a famous food hall, constructed in 1902–1903 for the Elisseeff Brothers. Located at 56 Nevsky Prospekt, the complex consists of three buildings, although the corner one is the structure that is referred to as Elisseeff’s store or shop (Елисеевский магазин). Designed by architect Gabriel Baranovskii (Baranovsky, Baranowski, Гавриил Васильевич Барановский), it is one of the most striking examples of St. Petersburg Art Nouveau architecture, although at the time of its construction the building was considered controversial.Contents1 History1.1 Attempt on Alexander II's life 1.2 Present building 1.3 Name2 Architecture2.1 Tomcat statue3 References 4 Other sources 5 External linksHistory[edit] Attempt on Alexander II's life[edit] A restaurant formerly stood at the site
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Alexander Nevsky Lavra
Coordinates: 59°55′16″N 30°23′17″E / 59.921°N 30.388°E / 59.921; 30.388 Saint Alexander Nevsky Lavra or Saint Alexander Nevsky Monastery was founded by Peter I of Russia in 1710 at the eastern end of the Nevsky Prospekt in Saint Petersburg supposing that that was the site of the Neva Battle in 1240 when Alexander Nevsky, a prince, defeated the Swedes; however, the battle actually took place about 12 miles (19 km) away from that site.[1] "On April 5, 1713, in St. Petersburg, in the presence of Peter I, the wooden Church of the Annunciation was consecrated. This day is considered the official founding date of the Alexander Nevsky Lavra."[2] "The relics of St. Alexander Nevsky were solemnly transferred from Vladimir to the new capital of Russia September 12, 1724 by decree of Peter the Great."[3] Nevsky became patron of the newly founded Russian capital; however, the massive silver sarcophagus of St
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Crime And Punishment
Crime and Punishment
Crime and Punishment
(Russian: Преступлéние и наказáние, tr. Prestupleniye i nakazaniye, IPA: [prʲɪstʊˈplʲenʲɪje ɪ nəkɐˈzanʲɪje]) is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky. It was first published in the literary journal The Russian Messenger
The Russian Messenger
in twelve monthly installments during 1866.[1] Later, it was published in a single volume. It is the second of Dostoevsky's full-length novels following his return from 5 years of exile in Siberia. Crime and Punishment
Crime and Punishment
is considered the first great novel of his "mature" period of writing.[2] Crime and Punishment
Crime and Punishment
focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in Saint Petersburg who formulates a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her money
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Fyodor Dostoevsky
Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky[a] (/ˌdɒstəˈjɛfski, ˌdʌs-/;[1] Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский, IPA: [ˈfʲɵdər mʲɪˈxajləvʲɪtɕ dəstɐˈjɛfskʲɪj] ( listen); 11 November 1821 – 9 February 1881),[b] sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky, was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist, journalist and philosopher. Dostoevsky's literary works explore human psychology in the troubled political, social, and spiritual atmospheres of 19th-century Russia, and engage with a variety of realistic philosophical and religious themes. He began writing in his 20s, and his first novel, Poor Folk, was published in 1846 when he was 25. His most acclaimed works include Crime and Punishment
Crime and Punishment
(1866), The Idiot (1869), Demons (1872) and The Brothers Karamazov (1880). Dostoevsky's oeuvre consists of 11 novels, three novellas, 17 short stories and numerous other works
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Nikolai Gogol
Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol (/ˈɡoʊɡəl, -ɡɔːl/;[4] Russian: Никола́й Васи́льевич Го́голь, tr. Nikolay Vasilievich Gogol, IPA: [nʲɪkɐˈlaj vɐˈsʲilʲjɪvʲɪtɕ ˈgogəlʲ], Ukrainian: Мико́ла Васи́льович Го́голь, translit. Mykola Vasylovych Hohol; 31 March [O.S. 19 March] 1809 – 4 March [O.S. 21 February] 1852) was a Russian[5][6][7][8][9] dramatist of Ukrainian origin.[6][10][11][12][13] Although Gogol was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the preeminent figures of the natural school of Russian literary realism, later critics have found in his work a fundamentally romantic sensibility, with strains of surrealism and the grotesque ("The Nose", "Viy", "The Overcoat," "Nevsky Prospekt")
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Anichkov Bridge
The Anichkov Bridge (Russian: Аничков мост, Anichkov Most) is the oldest and most famous bridge across the Fontanka River in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The current bridge, built in 1841-42 and reconstructed in 1906-08, combines a simple form with some spectacular decorations. As well as its four famous horse sculptures (1849–50), the bridge has some of the most celebrated ornate iron railings in Saint Petersburg. The structure is mentioned in the works of Pushkin, Gogol, and Dostoevsky. The first bridge was built in 1715-16 by order of Peter the Great, and named after its engineer, Mikhail Anichkov. The bridge was made of wood with several spans built on piles of supports lying just above the Fontanka River. It was designed by Domenico Trezzini.[1] Nothing remains of this first bridge. As the city grew and river traffic increased, plans were unveiled in 1721 to create a new drawbridge
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Restaurant
A restaurant (/ˈrɛstərənt/ or /ˈrɛstərɒnt/; French: [ʀɛs.to.ʁɑ̃] ( listen)), or an eatery, is a business which prepares and serves food and drinks to customers in exchange for money. Meals are generally served and eaten on the premises, but many restaurants also offer take-out and food delivery services, and some offer only take-out and delivery. Restaurants vary greatly in appearance and offerings, including a wide variety of cuisines and service models ranging from inexpensive fast food restaurants and cafeterias to mid-priced family restaurants, to high-priced luxury establishments. In Western countries, most mid- to high-range restaurants serve alcoholic beverages such as beer and wine
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Writers
A writer is a person who uses written words in various styles and techniques to communicate their ideas. Writers produce various forms of literary art and creative writing such as novels, short stories, poetry, plays, screenplays, and essays as well as various reports and news articles that may be of interest to the public. Writers' texts are published across a range of media. Skilled writers who are able to use language to express ideas well often contribute significantly to the cultural content of a society.[1] The term "writer" is also used elsewhere in the arts – such as songwriter – but as a standalone "writer" normally refers to the creation of written language. Some writers work from an oral tradition. Writers can produce material across a number of genres, fictional or non-fictional. Other writers use multiple media – for example, graphics or illustration – to enhance the communication of their ideas
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Catherine The Great
Catherine II (Russian: Екатерина Алексеевна Yekaterina Alekseyevna; 2 May [O.S. 21 April] 1729 – 17 November [O.S. 6 November] 1796), also known as Catherine the Great (Екатери́на Вели́кая, Yekaterina Velikaya), born Princess Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst, was Empress
Empress
of Russia from 1762 until 1796, the country's longest-ruling female leader. She came to power following a coup d'état when her husband, Peter III, was assassinated. Under her reign, Russia was revitalised; it grew larger and stronger, and was recognised as one of the great powers of Europe. In her accession to power and her rule of the empire, Catherine often relied on her noble favourites, most notably Grigory Orlov
Grigory Orlov
and Grigory Potemkin
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Nevsky Prospekt (story)
"Nevsky Prospekt" (Russian: Невский Проспект) is a short story by Nikolai Gogol, written between 1831 and 1834, and published in 1835. Summary[edit] Influenced strongly by the Sentimental movement, the protagonist of "Nevsky Prospekt" is a pathetic and insignificant romantic, the narrator is chatty and unreliable, (along the lines of Tristram Shandy, the definitive Sentimental novel) and realism dominates. The story is organized symmetrically; the narrator describes Nevsky Prospekt in great detail, then the plot splits to follow in turn two acquaintances, each of whom follows a beautiful woman whom he has seen on the street. The first story follows the romantic hero, the second follows his realistic foil. The story closes with the narrator once more speaking generally of Nevsky Prospekt. The introduction describes Nevsky Prospekt, the central avenue of St. Petersburg, and its population at different times of the day
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Singer House
Singer House (Russian: Дом компании «Зингер»), also widely known as the House of Books (Russian: Дом книги), is a building located at the intersection of Nevsky Prospekt and the Griboyedov Canal, directly opposite the Kazan Cathedral in Saint Petersburg, Russia. It is recognized as a historical landmark, has official status as an object of Russian cultural heritage, and contains the headquarters of the VK social network.Contents1 History 2 Sources 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The building was designed by architect Pavel Suzor for the Russian branch of the Singer Sewing Machine Company
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Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
(/ˌɑːrt nuːˈvoʊ, ˌɑːr/; French: [aʁ nuvo]) is an international style of art, architecture and applied art, especially the decorative arts, that was most popular between 1890 and 1910.[1] A reaction to the academic art of the 19th century, it was inspired by natural forms and structures, particularly the curved lines of plants and flowers. English uses the French name Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
(new art)
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October Revolution
Bolshevik victoryEnd of Russian Provisional Government, Russian Republic
Russian Republic
and dual power Creation of Soviet Russia The Second All-Russian Congress of Soviets
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Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
(from Greek νέος nèos, "new" and Latin
Latin
classicus, "of the highest rank")[1] is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of classical antiquity. Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
was born in Rome
Rome
in the mid-18th century, at the time of the rediscovery of Pompeii
Pompeii
and Herculaneum, but its popularity spread all over Europe as a generation of European art students finished their Grand Tour
Grand Tour
and returned from Italy to their home countries with newly rediscovered Greco-Roman ideals.[2][3] The main Neoclassical movement coincided with the 18th-century Age of Enlightenment, and continued into the early 19th century, laterally competing with Romanticism
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Admiralteyskaya (Saint Petersburg Metro)
Admiralteyskaya (Russian: Адмиралте́йская) is a Saint Petersburg Metro station on the Frunzensko-Primorskaya Line of the Saint Petersburg Metro. Opened on 28 December 2011, it is designed to relieve congestion at the Nevsky Prospekt and Gostiny Dvor stations, as well as to provide a more direct link to the Hermitage and other notable museums. However, the completion of the stations was hampered by the lack of funds and ongoing controversy over the placement of station's exit. The station will eventually provide a transfer to the Nevsko-Vasileostrovskaya Line station tentatively designated Admiralteyskaya-2 (the construction of that station has not begun yet). After the exit location was settled, the station Admiralteyskaya-1 on the Frunzensko-Primorskaya Line was scheduled to open in 2008, but concerns over the station's historic significance pushed the opening back
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